Process Improvement

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What term do you use for low effort implementations?
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We have defined our desired process to identify, qualify, and manage Projects. One of the criteria we use to identify a 'project' is an expected effort of 4 weeks or more.

We now want to create a much lighter weight process for implementations that take less than 4 weeks. We want to track these as something other than 'Small Projects'. A search shows that many use the term Enhancement, but that conflicts with our definitions of Feature and Enhancement requests.

I am interested in learning how most orgs label these low effort implementations.

Thanks
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In the State of Florida, many of those projects are considered O&M. In other places I've worked, there has been a 250 hour LOE threshold. These smaller projects were not subject to the same level of governance as larger projects.

More on O&M -

1. Operations and Maintenance (O&M) activities that support an existing product or service to keep it in conformance with its originally intended specifications, functionality, and service levels are exempt from these standards. O& M activities include:
a. Adaptive Maintenance ? the modification of a product, performed after delivery, to keep a product usable in a changed or changing environment.
b. Corrective Maintenance ? the reactive modification of a product performed after delivery to correct discovered problems.
c. Perfective Maintenance ? the modification of a product after delivery to detect and correct latent faults in the product before they are manifested as failures.
d. Preventive Maintenance ? the modification of a product after delivery to detect and correct latent faults in the product before they become operational faults.
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Thanks for your response, Ellik. I should've clarified in my OP that my question is specific to new Feature or Enhancement requests, not Maintenance work.
Your info on classifying Maintenance projects is timely and useful as we will be looking at those next, thanks!
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1 reply by Ellik Hawkins
Jun 14, 2019 10:13 AM
Ellik Hawkins
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My pleasure. I agree that O&M may not fit is some instances. Many orgs that I work with use the portion "support an existing product or service to keep it in conformance with its originally intended specifications" to justify including minor mods or enhancements. In my industry, many enhancements are based on statute or legislative mandate, so folks use O&M as a catch-all for smaller projects, since O&M are not subject to the same governance and compliance in Florida state gov't.
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Jun 14, 2019 9:59 AM
Replying to Naren Durgampudi
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Thanks for your response, Ellik. I should've clarified in my OP that my question is specific to new Feature or Enhancement requests, not Maintenance work.
Your info on classifying Maintenance projects is timely and useful as we will be looking at those next, thanks!
My pleasure. I agree that O&M may not fit is some instances. Many orgs that I work with use the portion "support an existing product or service to keep it in conformance with its originally intended specifications" to justify including minor mods or enhancements. In my industry, many enhancements are based on statute or legislative mandate, so folks use O&M as a catch-all for smaller projects, since O&M are not subject to the same governance and compliance in Florida state gov't.
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We just use a numerical coding system with 1 being a very large change that everyone starts to pay a lot of attention to, down to 4 which is a pure copy of a previous project. It's essentially high, medium, low, and no change. It's office jargon, but once everyone knows what the thresholds are, when I say Code 2 in the office, everyone knows what I mean.

We have a couple other simple classifications for other types of change as well (e.g. Major vs. Minor), but the important thing is that you have criteria for the change, and you know what they mean, not that everyone in the industry does.
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I think the term O&M could be used in any industry. I am in State Government, Software Development Project Management specifically.
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That's like happen to me right now Naren. The commercial side, they don't want provide item excluded on budget plan. But on another side, operation don't want accept if the item not compatible with our standard specification. So they've different orientations & concern. Because this is about budget I think it is not my capacity to determine which best solution to solve this case. I decided to consult with our deputy CTO and he still wants the item have to use consider with our standard specification to ensure our services can deliver as well. It's not only about prestigious, more than that. We'll try to keep the reputation of our brand and we don't want to lose the trust of our customers. Finally he wants for the next project plan, supposed to be we create multiple options classification like Keith said start from low, medium and high including risk possibility (strength and weaknesses). Then let him choice which the option fit in with him consideration.
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I have always been partial to the complexity model. How complex a project usually provides a good indicator of how much it should be governed. Complexity could be an objective measure if you do not use a suitable set of metrics to measure it so it is very important to define this well up from. The type of project and industry will obviously play a role in defining the metrics but typical common one I use often, the level of tech used, is it bleeding edge, are team members familiar with it, how many stakeholders will be involved, what is the strategic importantance, what is the integration level, to name just a few.

There are two reasons why I Iike using this model - a) it gives me a good indication of where the risk will come from allowing me to approach it from the right direction and b) it is a continues process where you update you metrics often and if any metric increases then you know you are not doing something right since complexity should increase without a significant scope change.
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Although the "project" of less than 4 weeks of effort would produce unique deliverables, it may not be added value to track it as a project. Depending on the industry, an ITSM approach may work better where you would manage only the SDLC (Systems Development Lifecycle) and monitor and control the execution.

If have seen a number of PMOs trying to manage similar operational initiatives as projects to create a consolidated picture of costs, resource capacity, but often this results in a stronger focus on the processes as opposed to creating the deliverables for the customer. Any such "project" would benefit from Agile processes as well, keeping focus on the outcome and increasing the value delivered.

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