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Topics: Business Analysis/Requirements Management, Consulting, Strategy
i am looking for a A Success Measurement Model for Construction Projects, project success index for finished project. can somebody help me?
Network:31



i want to develop a success measurement model for construction projects to fulfill two main objectives: to provide a project success index for every finished projects in order to compare them with each other and to establish a benchmark for future improvement in success of construction project execution.in my point of view Project Success Criteria are Time Performance, Cost Performance, Quality Performance, HSE, Client Satisfaction.
how can i calculate? formula?
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Projects are unique by nature. comparing the unique items is a little bit tricky. However, you may need to define your indexes as a ratio to that specific project and then compare the results among the projects. For example, Actual Duration/Planned duration.
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You need to define your Key Performance Indicators (KPI) and quantify them and then compare each project against those metrics. If projects are similar in nature to each other then you can compare results for example the $/sf or the timeline and so on. Some metrics like customer satisfaction are Qualitative but you still can quantify them in a way for comparison purposes.
Network:31



I am trying do develop something similar. Not sure of formula how they would relate, but the following have been shortlisted to be taken into consideration.

Objective measure of scope, schedule, cost performance
Number of change requests
Number of issues
Subjective measure of team health
Subjective measure of stakeholder satisfaction
...
1 reply by Stéphane Parent
Jul 03, 2019 2:09 PM
Stéphane Parent
...
I don't see how the number of change requests or the number of issues are a reflection of project success.

Project change is not inherently bad. Managed well, your project can be successful with many change requests.

In my thirty years of project management, I have not seen a correlation between the number of issues and project success. If anything, the higher the number of issues, the more likely was my project to be successful. It's probably due to the active management of identified issues. A better measure is the time to issue resolution. I see a direct trend between low issue resolution time and project sucess.
Network:98136



For time and cost, you can use earned value analysis to give you, respectively, the SPI and CPI. These are fairly portable indices.

For quality, you need to track defects released against those fixed in the project. For the construction business, you might want to compare the costs of pre- and post-release defect repairs. As well, you might want to compare the total cost of ownership against the project costs.

For client satisfaction, the simplest way is to use surveys. They can be tricky as they are subjective in nature.
Network:98136



Jul 03, 2019 3:35 AM
Replying to Kristian Soini
...
I am trying do develop something similar. Not sure of formula how they would relate, but the following have been shortlisted to be taken into consideration.

Objective measure of scope, schedule, cost performance
Number of change requests
Number of issues
Subjective measure of team health
Subjective measure of stakeholder satisfaction
I don't see how the number of change requests or the number of issues are a reflection of project success.

Project change is not inherently bad. Managed well, your project can be successful with many change requests.

In my thirty years of project management, I have not seen a correlation between the number of issues and project success. If anything, the higher the number of issues, the more likely was my project to be successful. It's probably due to the active management of identified issues. A better measure is the time to issue resolution. I see a direct trend between low issue resolution time and project sucess.
...
1 reply by Kristian Soini
Jul 04, 2019 6:59 PM
Kristian Soini
...
Strictly speaking I think you are right about number of issues not related to project success. I am involved in tendering and design and then project management of successful tenders. For me, the number of issues and changes is an indication of how well the job was scoped.
Network:31



Jul 03, 2019 2:09 PM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
...
I don't see how the number of change requests or the number of issues are a reflection of project success.

Project change is not inherently bad. Managed well, your project can be successful with many change requests.

In my thirty years of project management, I have not seen a correlation between the number of issues and project success. If anything, the higher the number of issues, the more likely was my project to be successful. It's probably due to the active management of identified issues. A better measure is the time to issue resolution. I see a direct trend between low issue resolution time and project sucess.
Strictly speaking I think you are right about number of issues not related to project success. I am involved in tendering and design and then project management of successful tenders. For me, the number of issues and changes is an indication of how well the job was scoped.
...
1 reply by Mahboubeh Eslami
Jul 06, 2019 3:23 AM
Mahboubeh Eslami
...
do agree
Network:31



Jul 04, 2019 6:59 PM
Replying to Kristian Soini
...
Strictly speaking I think you are right about number of issues not related to project success. I am involved in tendering and design and then project management of successful tenders. For me, the number of issues and changes is an indication of how well the job was scoped.
do agree
Network:113374



A very interesting goal.

Some other points you might consider is the truthness of initial estimation of time, volume, ... It is often a cause of poor performance.

Also the level of project knowledge of your client. That could influence greatly the satisfaction survey.

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