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The importance of the presence of the statistician for the presentation of a result.
Network:19



Recently I was asked for an analysis of the ages of the partners and their assistance from one of the companies to which I provide data custody.
This information was the excerpt immediately from the consultation of the ages of the Active and Life members of the Club.
The average showed a certain result to the Manager's surprise.
What I did not know was that the request came from a higher level, of the Club Directory.
The manager took the data and took it to the applicant, I was not invited to this presentation.
The following Monday, he quotes me and tells me that they need expansion to the generated queries, that the representation was not clear.
What is the obvious error, that whoever extracts the information knows the sources and their potential, in this case the manager acts as an intermediary and oblivious to technical knowledge, intends to face the exhibition, the questions that will always be presented and also draw up a more comprehensive plan of analysis and statistics.
It is essential that those who obtain the statistics expose the results, support the sources, indicate their shortcomings or possible distortions and be able to answer the questions. Additionally, if new statistics derived or mixed from the first are required, who is able to respond and refine or specify the requirement is the same statistic.
Except in the case where the manager knows the information from its origins, knows the extraction methods, knows about tabulation and presentation of data and margins of error.
In terms of cordiality, it is possible to prevent falling into this error by gently offering the exposure of the statistical product, in this way the new requirements can be directly received.
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Network:303



Unfortunately it appears that your manager used your analysis in a way it was not intended. That can definitely be problematic as it usually is given much more significance than it should, because of the formal nature of the science. Unfortunately, the technical specialist does not often get to decide who presents their analysis to directors.

I have had similar issues with people misrepresenting my work so there are a few things I typically do to try and avoid this situation. The first is to ask the customer, in this case your manager, how is your analysis being used. Understanding the audience and purpose can provide insight into what supporting information should be presented with the raw data. For a mean value such as this case, I would typically want to include a variance and visual distribution at a minimum, along with any disclaimers about the underlying data sources.

Directors usually don't want to see the detailed analysis so it is important to have a 1 page executive summary of your results and how they should be interpreted. The detailed analysis can be provided as back-up material if needed. I would make a point to your manager that if they are the ones to present a summary of your data to the director, then they should at least meet with you to discuss the analysis and its limitations before they misrepresent your work, to avoid situations such as this in the future.
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1 reply by MAURICIO CORRAL
Jul 29, 2019 6:48 PM
MAURICIO CORRAL
...
"...then they should at least meet with you to discuss the analysis and its limitations before they misrepresent your work..."

I proposed it, preventing any incident, but the manager dismissed the need.
If I were to be the manager in a similar situation I would take it, in order to avoid arrogance skills that I have not yet developed.
Network:19



Jul 29, 2019 5:31 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
Unfortunately it appears that your manager used your analysis in a way it was not intended. That can definitely be problematic as it usually is given much more significance than it should, because of the formal nature of the science. Unfortunately, the technical specialist does not often get to decide who presents their analysis to directors.

I have had similar issues with people misrepresenting my work so there are a few things I typically do to try and avoid this situation. The first is to ask the customer, in this case your manager, how is your analysis being used. Understanding the audience and purpose can provide insight into what supporting information should be presented with the raw data. For a mean value such as this case, I would typically want to include a variance and visual distribution at a minimum, along with any disclaimers about the underlying data sources.

Directors usually don't want to see the detailed analysis so it is important to have a 1 page executive summary of your results and how they should be interpreted. The detailed analysis can be provided as back-up material if needed. I would make a point to your manager that if they are the ones to present a summary of your data to the director, then they should at least meet with you to discuss the analysis and its limitations before they misrepresent your work, to avoid situations such as this in the future.
"...then they should at least meet with you to discuss the analysis and its limitations before they misrepresent your work..."

I proposed it, preventing any incident, but the manager dismissed the need.
If I were to be the manager in a similar situation I would take it, in order to avoid arrogance skills that I have not yet developed.

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