Process Improvement

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Workflow Allocation methods for a more balanced workload
Anonymous
Hi I just got my CAPM recently and applied for a job as a Client Analyst but couldn't go further because I didnt give the best answers to this questions below:

1. Do you have any other recommendations on how to allocate workflow other than a client portfolio method? How would you manage this workflow?

2. What additional information might you take into consideration when preparing your recommendation?

The data showed four individuals in a team, same department and job title but one has 40% workload while the others have 14%, 27% and 19% in a year. My job was to analyze the data, extract useful information, and create a more balanced client portfolio which I did. But I recommended a Schedule-based portfolio method In question 1.
I would like to know more about this. Thanks
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There are many different allocation methods/algorithms you could employ which could all be categorized as either push (give) or pull (take). Two very common ones are the least utilized and round-robin. All methods have their pros and cond hence the second part of the question. With schedule-based, I assume that you were looking at a least utilized model i.e. the next job goes to the least utilized or least scheduled resource. Not sure what is meant by 'portfolio'? Maybe grouping the work by client?

Since the workload percentage itself can be misleading it would be unwise to use it as the only variably when allocating work. Why is there a big discrepancy in the workload in the firts place. For this reason, I would look at using a Weighted Round Robin algorithm that will take things into account such as work rate, quality and input/output ratio. The 40% could be as a result of a high work rate or it could be due to rework and this will influence you algorithm.
Anonymous
Thanks for the response

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