Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Agile, Information Technology, Scrum
Cloud poject management using Agile SCRUM, share experiences
Network:8



Like to know some information regarding your experiences in terms of running Agile SCRUM on Infrastructure projects.

In terms of best practices and challenges faced. For challenges, how to do you overcome it. Kindly propose some recommended strategies and approaches.


Thanks.
Sort By:
Network:1675



The main challenges with applying an adaptive lifecycle to infrastructure projects is you can't deliver half a server, and any infrastructure work involving procurement will usually require detailed requirements and specifications before orders can be placed.

However, you can apply an agile mindset to such projects. For example, if there are key technical unknowns, can you construct experiments to explore those uncertainties earlier to de-risk the project?

Kiron
Network:93



@Kiron I have seen a software development project in which the customer expected the software to be delivered in one go as a single release but still the software vendor used Scrum to develop the required features. In conclusion you can use Scrum even if you make a single delivery after many months of work.

It may sound strange but I have seen Scrum working with waterfall projects. I am not sure but delivering workable software after each sprint is something that customers usually can't handle.
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Sep 07, 2019 7:13 PM
Kiron Bondale
...
I don't see how Scrum and Waterfall can co-exist for the same scope of work. For example, why would you refine a backlog if the backlog is defined up front? You can certainly adopt an anti-pattern such as Water-Scrum-Fall or have a project where some of the scope is delivered in a waterfall lifecycle and some following Scrum.
Network:1675



Sep 07, 2019 1:34 PM
Replying to Adrian Carlogea
...
@Kiron I have seen a software development project in which the customer expected the software to be delivered in one go as a single release but still the software vendor used Scrum to develop the required features. In conclusion you can use Scrum even if you make a single delivery after many months of work.

It may sound strange but I have seen Scrum working with waterfall projects. I am not sure but delivering workable software after each sprint is something that customers usually can't handle.
I don't see how Scrum and Waterfall can co-exist for the same scope of work. For example, why would you refine a backlog if the backlog is defined up front? You can certainly adopt an anti-pattern such as Water-Scrum-Fall or have a project where some of the scope is delivered in a waterfall lifecycle and some following Scrum.
...
1 reply by Adrian Carlogea
Sep 08, 2019 4:20 AM
Adrian Carlogea
...
In one of the cases I saw the software vendor had to deliver a new GIS system and this included also a lot of software development to add customized features asked by the client. The client wanted the software to be delivered in one go as it would have been useless if just parts of it had been delivered at each iteration.

The iteration approach would have made no sense as it took more than a year before they had something workable and the client did not have time to check the features added in each sprint.

The vendor however used Scrum for software development so it would have been harder for them to drop it. The vendor's management forced the usage of Scrum but all the customers needed waterfall.

The idea is that in many circumstances you can use Scrum to define your work, prioritize it and track it even if you do this internally and you don't deliver to customer. This could work also in IT infrastructure projects, in each sprint for example you could define some tasks and perform them even if you don't deliver.
Network:93



Sep 07, 2019 7:13 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
I don't see how Scrum and Waterfall can co-exist for the same scope of work. For example, why would you refine a backlog if the backlog is defined up front? You can certainly adopt an anti-pattern such as Water-Scrum-Fall or have a project where some of the scope is delivered in a waterfall lifecycle and some following Scrum.
In one of the cases I saw the software vendor had to deliver a new GIS system and this included also a lot of software development to add customized features asked by the client. The client wanted the software to be delivered in one go as it would have been useless if just parts of it had been delivered at each iteration.

The iteration approach would have made no sense as it took more than a year before they had something workable and the client did not have time to check the features added in each sprint.

The vendor however used Scrum for software development so it would have been harder for them to drop it. The vendor's management forced the usage of Scrum but all the customers needed waterfall.

The idea is that in many circumstances you can use Scrum to define your work, prioritize it and track it even if you do this internally and you don't deliver to customer. This could work also in IT infrastructure projects, in each sprint for example you could define some tasks and perform them even if you don't deliver.
Network:8



Thanks Kiron and Adrian for your respective feedbacks.

Agreed, that applying SCRUM for Infrastructure project does pose challenges. What I am currently doing is just creating stories and tasks related to a 2 weeks scrum based on work that Cloud SME engineers and Operational resource have to work on. It has to be Agile and unable to apply Waterfall model or other methodologies for now. This like Onboarding new VM's like patching, scanning, monitoring. Then also opening firewalls, doing network configurations, ensuring Security things like SSL, CyberArk etc are installed and then work with Apps team to onboard Apps.

Its easier to apply the Agile Scrum Mindset to Software development environment which I was doing in my previous 2 organizations as Project Manager cum SCRUM Master.
Network:93



Well, while you could use Scrum for IT infrastructure projects I don't think it would bring any benefit, on the contrary it can make matters worse. Infrastructure engineers know very well what they have to do once they have the requirements for the applications that would be using the infrastructure. They may get very annoyed and may deliver much slower if you start witting business users stories for them.

Scrum could work if they write their own tasks and use the framework to manage their own work.

Scrum is really efficient for a limited type of activities, usually software product development, but unfortunately companies think is good for almost everything. Scrum doesn't even work well with many software development projects because customers usually say something like this: these are our requirements, how much does it cost to do them?

Finally SMEs would eventually do the same work no matter if Scrum is used or not but Scrum could make their life harder if it does not fit well with their work.
Network:8



Agreed. Infact, in my organization the task creation and doing are normally done by the engineers but stories and epics tied to those tasks are created and managed by the SCRUM Masters / Project Managers.

We try to leverage SCRUM in whatever best that brings about value to the organization and client using the resources onhand.
Network:106664



Why does it have to be Scrum? Just use an agile mindset and don't worry about trying to fit your infrastructures projects into arbitrary boxes. Think backlog, iterations, increments, stand-ups, reviews and retrospective.

I would not worry about stories, story points, MVP, ...

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"I choose a block of marble and chop off whatever I don't need."

- Rodin

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors