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Topics: Business Analysis/Requirements Management
What if customer added a requirement in a stringent timeline?
Network:143



Many of client/customer tendency to add valuable requirement in the last stage of project where timeline really matter.

What is your end findings with this regards. Where we already know item not in WBS not in part of deliverables.
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Network:2416



Rajon,

any new requirement is a change request toward project scope (incl. WBS). It may also result in a change request to the contract scope, cost and timelines.

A change request must be logged (to get a joint understanding that there indeed is a change, which is sometimes disputed), analysed to find out its implementation options and their consequences (on other scope elements, timelines, cost, available rersource etc). Options may be e.g to implement immediatly or to delay for a future release, maybe implement a interim solution.

If this is the 1st logged change request, then you will have a lot of discussion and explaining of the process and needs. That's why it is recommended to start early with change request handling and to have a change management process agreed upon. In a SAP rollout some years ago, I had a change board meeting every Friday, full day!
Network:2276



Certainly, can be analyzed to determine impact and cost, then it is vetted formerly through the change request process. If they want to disrupt the plan for this item and pay the costs (dollars and timeline), it is their decision though that CR process, etc. That said, there is a need for reasonable and grounding discussions. If the ultimate recommended path is to follow through with the release, then incorporate as next phase, that should be put on the table as well.
Network:1568



Rajon -

Depending on the nature of the project and how "solid" the requirements are likely to be, two alternatives are:

1. Use an adaptive lifecycle and if time & cost are fixed, let scope delivery be driven by priority. So if a valuable, high priority requirement shows up late in the game, some lower value ones which were originally identified don't get delivered.

2. Establish a change budget at the onset which will be used to fund specific high value requirements over the project life. Of course, impacts on other constraints such as schedule or quality need to be assessed & approved, but that will at least reduce the need to seek funding approval for such changes.

Kiron
Network:1880



All changes are welcome if and only if they are processed by the defined project change control process. The final decision is not in hands of the project manager. The final decision is on the owners of the product. So, up to them.
Network:745



Interesting perspective and theme for reflection Dear Kiron.
Thank you
Network:263



Negotiation is required. This is where the "iron triangle" metaphor is very useful. New requirements are welcome, but scope changes imply a change to budget or schedule. Your customer is re-negotiating your agreement; no party to an agreement can change it unilaterally without regard to the other parties.

Also, this is something that we, as PMs, should anticipate. Rajon is correct, this tends to happen near the end of a project.
Network:321



I agree with the statements that changes are welcome if change management is followed, but late requirements are always a risk, so use caution. This can sometimes be an attempt for the customer to transfer risk to the supplier.

The change control process can take time to fully evaluate changes. They may try to shortcut the process by leaving insufficient time for due diligence.
Network:1048



As indicated by previous responses, change management kicks in. Proper analysis of the required change needs to be done. Then based on the impact of the change versus the benefit added the project sponsors can make a decision on how to proceed i.e. extend the project time, cost and budget to accommodate the change or toll it over to another project or phase.
Network:143



Hi All,

It's really a very good & positive feedback I have received. Really appreciable.

But actually the things happened in worst case. My team breadth is very less. On delivery every team member including me also have absolutely zero breadth. But the task has been given is rigorous one. Client/Customer told we have to deliver the item. Otherwise total delivery can fail. Even if they told CR, negotiation, cost, schedule etc. we need to manage. Without any delay they don't bother. Items are in forced situation.

We are doing overtime. What else we can do. Anything out of the box or apart from PMBOK general concept.
...
2 replies by Sergio Luis Conte and Thomas Walenta
Sep 12, 2019 5:12 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
Just to comment, in this forum, I never wirte things "by the book" except when asking posts related to PMBOK. Is a matter of cost-benefit. If you, your team and your organization is accepting this situation is because all those actors perceived a benefit in accepting it. Take into account that, taken what you describe, there is no cost for the customer because the cost is traslated to you, your team and your organization.
Sep 12, 2019 5:35 AM
Thomas Walenta
...
If, as I understand, milestones are fix and scope is increased, you might think to descope other things. And add skilled resources to the team, regardless of cost. All this is highly risky though.

And your negotiating position seems weak.
Make sure you write an CYA letter to protect yourself and team from their decisions.

Many similar stories led to total project failure. For example Berlin airport is delayed several years mainly because of scope change (originally it was meant to be a fast boarding airport then sponsors added malls).
Network:1880



Sep 12, 2019 4:39 AM
Replying to RAJON BANERJEE
...
Hi All,

It's really a very good & positive feedback I have received. Really appreciable.

But actually the things happened in worst case. My team breadth is very less. On delivery every team member including me also have absolutely zero breadth. But the task has been given is rigorous one. Client/Customer told we have to deliver the item. Otherwise total delivery can fail. Even if they told CR, negotiation, cost, schedule etc. we need to manage. Without any delay they don't bother. Items are in forced situation.

We are doing overtime. What else we can do. Anything out of the box or apart from PMBOK general concept.
Just to comment, in this forum, I never wirte things "by the book" except when asking posts related to PMBOK. Is a matter of cost-benefit. If you, your team and your organization is accepting this situation is because all those actors perceived a benefit in accepting it. Take into account that, taken what you describe, there is no cost for the customer because the cost is traslated to you, your team and your organization.
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