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What are the first 3 things that you would take a look at when you take over a project which is half completed and have a huge pressure of meeting the completion dates.
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I have always seen project activities from end to end, however there was this question that came up in one of my discussions. There would be multiple right answers to this and would be based on the situation.

According to me the most important 3 things are
1. Looking at the completed milestones
2. Look at the key risk that are triggered
3. Is the project already crossed the budget plan

but open for suggestions and recommendations
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This has a bit of personal and technical decision:

1 - I always consider first if the project is possible to complete on schedule and budget
and what are there management reserves and scheduled buffers, if I could not complete the project according this assumptions and they are not flexible probably I do not accept the project, if this is not an alternative then a meeting with the stakeholders and sponsor is mandatory
2 - I evaluate the risk , in a meeting with the project team, assessing the team simultaneously
3 - look at completed milestones evaluating the deliverables validation
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Regarding 1, what is the objective to meet the stakeholders, if the project has to be taken-up and completed in time.
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1 reply by Alexandre Costa
Sep 16, 2019 3:50 PM
Alexandre Costa
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This is a theoretical exercise, nevertheless if with the current resources and budget is not possible to complete on time, or because most of the budget already was spent or the schedule slippage was out of control, you must to meet with the sponsor to increase the budget. If not, how do you do the magic of completing the project on time if you don't have enough budget or resources, maintaining the scope?
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First make sure the prior milestones have been adequately completed and signed off. Second, ensure the plan for remaining work is realistic and achievable with the given staffing. Third, ensure sponsor and end user buy-in is present to support remaining work. Even with those three things the completion date may be a wish given scope and budget.
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Sep 16, 2019 3:13 PM
Replying to Sandeep Shinde
...
Regarding 1, what is the objective to meet the stakeholders, if the project has to be taken-up and completed in time.
This is a theoretical exercise, nevertheless if with the current resources and budget is not possible to complete on time, or because most of the budget already was spent or the schedule slippage was out of control, you must to meet with the sponsor to increase the budget. If not, how do you do the magic of completing the project on time if you don't have enough budget or resources, maintaining the scope?
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Thanks a lot for the insight I think I understand that we are talking about the same thing that without understanding the scope, completion status and stakeholder buy-in there is no way that we can take over this project. This triggers one more question from me

Is there a template or set of primary questions that should be sent over to the Stakeholder and delivery team we should ask to
1. Collect the above mentioned info
2. Make adjustments to resources or cost if needed
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Probability I added to your list, a prediction of what will be done with the current budget, resources in the remaining time. It's a possibility that the completion time could be mandatory and in that case is possible to the stakeholders prioritize the requirements most important and discard the less important (muscow or Kano Model) in this case they change the scope and focus in a minimum viable product , but this depends of the type of project.
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1. Review and understand the project scope
2. Review the project schedule milestones and work completed to date
3. Review the Risks
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4. Your next step is talk to the team....
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I think as a new project manager to a half completed project, we should spend sufficient time to investigate and to understand the current status of the project before we can start to manage it. Three things I think we should do are:
1. Have quick look at project charter, project management plan, latest project status report
2. Have a retrospective meeting with project team
3. Have a meeting or face-to-face talk with key stakeholders (Maybe business stakeholders, product manager, product owner, customers...)
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Your first action should be to speak to the sponsor so you have the direction, scope, budget and approval. It's a scaled down version o what you would do to scope a new project. Discovery is the follow on action (PMP, schedule, budget) for you to 1) determine the gap (what was completed/what is remaining) by talking to the project team, stakeholders and core team and 2) report the immediate and projected action that can be take to bring the project across the finish line.
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