Project Management Central

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Topics: Career Development
Would paying to learn a project management software be helpful to entering the industry and to apply for jobs?
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Looking to transition into a career in Project Management as a Coordinator; Would paying to learn a project management software be helpful to entering the industry and to apply for jobs? If so, which project management software would be most beneficial to gain experience on (i.e. Microsoft Project)? Appreciate any expertise and guidance!
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Peter -

software can help but unless you are purely looking at a role as a project administrator, you'd want to get lots of hands-on experience with the hard and soft skills of the profession.

Kiron
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1 reply by Peter Hillman
Oct 25, 2019 11:02 AM
Peter Hillman
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Thank you Kiron. Thinking purely as a tool to help me break into project management at an entry-level; whether or not having pm software training on my resume will help me land a job...
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Peter

While certifications and learning is important, Recruiters consider those as an asset and they might help you get ahead of the line for an interview but during the interview the focus is normally on actual hands-on experience unless you are looking for an entry level post.

RK
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Oct 25, 2019 10:53 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Peter -

software can help but unless you are purely looking at a role as a project administrator, you'd want to get lots of hands-on experience with the hard and soft skills of the profession.

Kiron
Thank you Kiron. Thinking purely as a tool to help me break into project management at an entry-level; whether or not having pm software training on my resume will help me land a job...
Network:2419



I see where you are coming from, and headed, but as Kiron and Rami shared, it is not solely about the tool, though the experience would certainly provide value. The problem is that each organization does its own thing, i.e. using excel, MS Project, Jira, or a combination of stuff!

For some experience and knowledge, check out Udemy, Youtube, and MPUG (for MS Project), and LinkedIn Learning. Having some familiarity, and comfortability, definitely will not hurt.

I have found gaining practical experience over the years makes you more adept at picking up the various tools quickly as they have many similarities. GL!
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1 reply by Peter Hillman
Oct 25, 2019 8:47 PM
Peter Hillman
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I really appreciate your insight. All fantastic points here to better keep me focused. Thank you!
Network:13



Oct 25, 2019 8:01 PM
Replying to Andrew Craig
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I see where you are coming from, and headed, but as Kiron and Rami shared, it is not solely about the tool, though the experience would certainly provide value. The problem is that each organization does its own thing, i.e. using excel, MS Project, Jira, or a combination of stuff!

For some experience and knowledge, check out Udemy, Youtube, and MPUG (for MS Project), and LinkedIn Learning. Having some familiarity, and comfortability, definitely will not hurt.

I have found gaining practical experience over the years makes you more adept at picking up the various tools quickly as they have many similarities. GL!
I really appreciate your insight. All fantastic points here to better keep me focused. Thank you!
Network:2160



Dear Peter
Interesting your question
Thank you for formulating it
I believe it depends on the sector of activity in which you will be project manager and / or the company you are applying for
If you are a technology company, the most used software is Jira.
If you are a company operating in other business sectors you may consider other project management platforms, such as:
- Trello
- Asana
- Basecamp
- Microsoft Project
I can only agree with the opinions of Kiron, Rami and Andrew
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1 reply by Peter Hillman
Oct 26, 2019 10:08 AM
Peter Hillman
...
Thank you for the good tips and insight!
Network:13



Oct 26, 2019 6:44 AM
Replying to Luis Branco
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Dear Peter
Interesting your question
Thank you for formulating it
I believe it depends on the sector of activity in which you will be project manager and / or the company you are applying for
If you are a technology company, the most used software is Jira.
If you are a company operating in other business sectors you may consider other project management platforms, such as:
- Trello
- Asana
- Basecamp
- Microsoft Project
I can only agree with the opinions of Kiron, Rami and Andrew
Thank you for the good tips and insight!
Network:635



Peter,

In my opinion, the best way to enter the industry in the DC area is as a Project Analyst or Project Coordinator. Those job descriptions are often vague, and if you can demonstrate good organizational skills and an ability to quickly learn new concepts you can likely obtain one of these positions.
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1 reply by Peter Hillman
Oct 26, 2019 4:32 PM
Peter Hillman
...
Perfect. Thank you.
Network:13



Oct 26, 2019 3:11 PM
Replying to Eric Simms
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Peter,

In my opinion, the best way to enter the industry in the DC area is as a Project Analyst or Project Coordinator. Those job descriptions are often vague, and if you can demonstrate good organizational skills and an ability to quickly learn new concepts you can likely obtain one of these positions.
Perfect. Thank you.
Network:2524



My answer is no. All tools only cover parts of the spectrum of project management practice. The thing is you will need to know about a toolbox over time and be able to apply anything to a project.

As Eric says, entering the profession in a supportive function, shadowing and getting mentored by an experienced PM is a good and safe way.

Many of us were pushed into the fire though and had to struggle our way through. This is the quickest way.
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1 reply by Peter Hillman
Oct 28, 2019 9:38 AM
Peter Hillman
...
Thank you!
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