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How do you give feedback?
Network:1853



When giving feedback do you use any specific technique?
What results do you achieve using these techniques?
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Network:1660



Luis -

As a general rule, I'd praise in public and criticize in private. You also have to know the individual to be able to come up with the approach which is most likely to achieve your objective of getting them to accept the feedback - for some, that means giving it to them "straight" whereas for others, you may need to soften the blow.

I'd also suggest that the feedback needs to be timely and specific.

Kim Scott's Radical Candor provides a ton of great suggestions on improving feedback giving (and receiving).

Kiron
Network:1853



Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

It is a good principle "Praise in public and criticize in particular".

We agree with: "I'd also suggest that the feedback needs to be timely and specific"

When in private (face to face with a person) do you use any specific techniques to give feedback? Especially when it comes to a criticism?

As soon as I get the chance I will follow your suggestion and read Radical Candor by Kim Scott.
...
2 replies by Eric Simms and Kiron Bondale
Oct 31, 2019 11:35 AM
Eric Simms
...
Luis,

Having a good relationship with a person before you give the criticism makes a big difference. If I were to present criticism to an employee I had taken the time to know, she would likely take it very differently than if I presented that same criticism to an employee with whom I had rarely spoken. If people know you care about their success, they are more likely to interpret criticism as helpful, rather than a personal attack.
Oct 31, 2019 11:37 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
I like to start with re-establishing the relationship I have with the individual - a bit of small talk might help to put the person at ease.

I then like to ask the individual's permission to provide feedback unless it is a critical situation and the feedback can't wait.

I would then frame the specific situation and how that made me feel or my perception of it. The focus should not be on judging the individual but rather providing feedback on their actions or behaviors.

It is also very important to build in time for pauses and thoughts. Usually when the feedback is provided, the individual will need some time to process what they have heard and gather their thoughts.

If they are receptive to the feedback, I like to follow up with a "How can I help you with this in the future?".

Kiron
Network:635



Oct 31, 2019 10:51 AM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

It is a good principle "Praise in public and criticize in particular".

We agree with: "I'd also suggest that the feedback needs to be timely and specific"

When in private (face to face with a person) do you use any specific techniques to give feedback? Especially when it comes to a criticism?

As soon as I get the chance I will follow your suggestion and read Radical Candor by Kim Scott.
Luis,

Having a good relationship with a person before you give the criticism makes a big difference. If I were to present criticism to an employee I had taken the time to know, she would likely take it very differently than if I presented that same criticism to an employee with whom I had rarely spoken. If people know you care about their success, they are more likely to interpret criticism as helpful, rather than a personal attack.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Oct 31, 2019 5:43 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Eric
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.
In your opinion, is the care we should give feedback the same to the person we know and the person we do not know?
Network:63



I do understand the "praise in public and criticize in private" approach, however it can be interpreted by onlookers.

I would never criticise/give constructive feedback in public, but I do give positive feedback in private as well as in public. You run the risk of a team member thinking that a summons to an office is a negative experience, in my view.

Timely and specific is the key phrase. Ensuring praise is given can be harder than delivering critical feedback - it's all too easy to accept the good as BAU and the bad as something to shout about.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Oct 31, 2019 5:46 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear karl
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.
Do you use any specific approach to give critical feedback?
Network:1660



Oct 31, 2019 10:51 AM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

It is a good principle "Praise in public and criticize in particular".

We agree with: "I'd also suggest that the feedback needs to be timely and specific"

When in private (face to face with a person) do you use any specific techniques to give feedback? Especially when it comes to a criticism?

As soon as I get the chance I will follow your suggestion and read Radical Candor by Kim Scott.
I like to start with re-establishing the relationship I have with the individual - a bit of small talk might help to put the person at ease.

I then like to ask the individual's permission to provide feedback unless it is a critical situation and the feedback can't wait.

I would then frame the specific situation and how that made me feel or my perception of it. The focus should not be on judging the individual but rather providing feedback on their actions or behaviors.

It is also very important to build in time for pauses and thoughts. Usually when the feedback is provided, the individual will need some time to process what they have heard and gather their thoughts.

If they are receptive to the feedback, I like to follow up with a "How can I help you with this in the future?".

Kiron
Network:1853



Oct 31, 2019 11:35 AM
Replying to Eric Simms
...
Luis,

Having a good relationship with a person before you give the criticism makes a big difference. If I were to present criticism to an employee I had taken the time to know, she would likely take it very differently than if I presented that same criticism to an employee with whom I had rarely spoken. If people know you care about their success, they are more likely to interpret criticism as helpful, rather than a personal attack.
Dear Eric
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.
In your opinion, is the care we should give feedback the same to the person we know and the person we do not know?
Network:1853



Oct 31, 2019 11:36 AM
Replying to Karl Twort
...
I do understand the "praise in public and criticize in private" approach, however it can be interpreted by onlookers.

I would never criticise/give constructive feedback in public, but I do give positive feedback in private as well as in public. You run the risk of a team member thinking that a summons to an office is a negative experience, in my view.

Timely and specific is the key phrase. Ensuring praise is given can be harder than delivering critical feedback - it's all too easy to accept the good as BAU and the bad as something to shout about.
Dear karl
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.
Do you use any specific approach to give critical feedback?
...
1 reply by Karl Twort
Nov 01, 2019 7:56 AM
Karl Twort
...
Hi Luis,

it certainly depends on what level of concern/problem there is with the feedback to give. Sometimes a quick chat and a gentle word will suffice. In the main, I prefer to have good working relationships with the team from the get-go. This ensures that if difficult conversations need to be had, team members understand you are giving such feedback for a genuine reason.

Making sure you have all the relevant supporting information is important.

From a discussion point of view, always be clear with what you are trying to get across and most importantly, give the person you are talking to a chance to respond. Remaining calm is key and also ensure that you are able to offer support where possible if someone has a challenge they need help with.
Network:63



Oct 31, 2019 5:46 PM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear karl
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.
Do you use any specific approach to give critical feedback?
Hi Luis,

it certainly depends on what level of concern/problem there is with the feedback to give. Sometimes a quick chat and a gentle word will suffice. In the main, I prefer to have good working relationships with the team from the get-go. This ensures that if difficult conversations need to be had, team members understand you are giving such feedback for a genuine reason.

Making sure you have all the relevant supporting information is important.

From a discussion point of view, always be clear with what you are trying to get across and most importantly, give the person you are talking to a chance to respond. Remaining calm is key and also ensure that you are able to offer support where possible if someone has a challenge they need help with.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Nov 01, 2019 10:02 AM
Luis Branco
...
Deal Karl
Thank you for your opinion.

I have a position very similar to yours: "I prefer to have good working relationships with the team from the get-go"

There are four rules that I always respect:
1. Plan feedback: words to use and examples to support what I will say
2. "Preserve the person" and focus only on behavior
3. Be specific
4. Choose the right moment (timming) and have time available for the conversation to be proficient
Network:1853



Nov 01, 2019 7:56 AM
Replying to Karl Twort
...
Hi Luis,

it certainly depends on what level of concern/problem there is with the feedback to give. Sometimes a quick chat and a gentle word will suffice. In the main, I prefer to have good working relationships with the team from the get-go. This ensures that if difficult conversations need to be had, team members understand you are giving such feedback for a genuine reason.

Making sure you have all the relevant supporting information is important.

From a discussion point of view, always be clear with what you are trying to get across and most importantly, give the person you are talking to a chance to respond. Remaining calm is key and also ensure that you are able to offer support where possible if someone has a challenge they need help with.
Deal Karl
Thank you for your opinion.

I have a position very similar to yours: "I prefer to have good working relationships with the team from the get-go"

There are four rules that I always respect:
1. Plan feedback: words to use and examples to support what I will say
2. "Preserve the person" and focus only on behavior
3. Be specific
4. Choose the right moment (timming) and have time available for the conversation to be proficient

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