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Topics: Communications Management, Talent Management, Teams
How do you give feedback?
When giving feedback do you use any specific technique?
What results do you achieve using these techniques?
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I think 'as you go' feedback is the more important and not waiting for a specific meeting, point in the project plan, annual review or and other timed metric in order to give feedback in relation to aspects of the project. This approach also removes the failure to report on any serious issue or just "letting things slide" thinking. This type of feedback can take the form of a serious of question in order to clarify approach to particular project. An active engagement with all the moving parts in the project is required so that you have a wide and deep knowledge of the project in order to give valuable insight and constructive feedback to those that require it.
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2 replies by Daire Guiney and Luis Branco
Dec 11, 2019 1:29 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Daire
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

You wrote: "give valuable insight and constructive feedback to those who require it."

In your opinion which people require it?
Dec 13, 2019 12:42 PM
Daire Guiney
...
Regardless of the amount of experience a project manager has, new projects always through up new problems that require project managers to reflect on the approach, methodology, project team or any other aspect of the project in order to overcome a setback, hurdle or roadblock. As a result honest, constructive and open debate will encourage those in the know to give their feedback as to the direction of the project.
Dec 11, 2019 6:34 AM
Replying to Daire Guiney
...
I think 'as you go' feedback is the more important and not waiting for a specific meeting, point in the project plan, annual review or and other timed metric in order to give feedback in relation to aspects of the project. This approach also removes the failure to report on any serious issue or just "letting things slide" thinking. This type of feedback can take the form of a serious of question in order to clarify approach to particular project. An active engagement with all the moving parts in the project is required so that you have a wide and deep knowledge of the project in order to give valuable insight and constructive feedback to those that require it.
Dear Daire
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

You wrote: "give valuable insight and constructive feedback to those who require it."

In your opinion which people require it?
Hello Luis: I really like what my peers have already shared. When I give feedback, my technique is to speak carefully and respectfully. Treat the other person the way I would want to be treated. This goes for praise and for constructive feedback. I often refer to the book titled For Your Improvement - A guide for development and coaching written by Michael M. Lombardo and Robert W. Eichinger. My version is older, it is the 4th edition, but I always crack it open and refer to it. What I love about this book are the sections giving bullet points for most types of leadership skills as unskilled, skilled and overused skill. The book also provides up to 10 remedies per skill. I have found this very helpful over the years and try to use the remedies in ongoing 1:1's or mentoring. There are also many suggested reading options for each skillset.
When I follow the strategies in the book and use my soft skills, this has worked very well for me. I hope this is helpful!
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Dec 11, 2019 4:28 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Lori
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Very interesting what you wrote: "When I give feedback, my technique is to speak carefully and respectfully. Treat the other person the way I would want to be treated. This goes for praise and for constructive feedback."

Do you usually use this approach in all situations?

When, for example:
- Objectives are not achieved
- Systematic errors are made forcing rework.
- other people's work is compromised
- Other unpleasant situations

Do you use any specific techniques to give feedback?
Great tips from this thread. I will surely apply some of the strategies.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Dec 11, 2019 4:30 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Handirove
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

What specific techniques or approaches do you refer to?
Dec 11, 2019 2:23 PM
Replying to LORI WILSON
...
Hello Luis: I really like what my peers have already shared. When I give feedback, my technique is to speak carefully and respectfully. Treat the other person the way I would want to be treated. This goes for praise and for constructive feedback. I often refer to the book titled For Your Improvement - A guide for development and coaching written by Michael M. Lombardo and Robert W. Eichinger. My version is older, it is the 4th edition, but I always crack it open and refer to it. What I love about this book are the sections giving bullet points for most types of leadership skills as unskilled, skilled and overused skill. The book also provides up to 10 remedies per skill. I have found this very helpful over the years and try to use the remedies in ongoing 1:1's or mentoring. There are also many suggested reading options for each skillset.
When I follow the strategies in the book and use my soft skills, this has worked very well for me. I hope this is helpful!
Dear Lori
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Very interesting what you wrote: "When I give feedback, my technique is to speak carefully and respectfully. Treat the other person the way I would want to be treated. This goes for praise and for constructive feedback."

Do you usually use this approach in all situations?

When, for example:
- Objectives are not achieved
- Systematic errors are made forcing rework.
- other people's work is compromised
- Other unpleasant situations

Do you use any specific techniques to give feedback?
...
1 reply by LORI WILSON
Dec 11, 2019 7:31 PM
LORI WILSON
...
Hello Luis: Yes, I do try to use this approach in all situations and it is how I try to live my life. When objectives are not achieved, I try to go to the root cause. When systematic errors are made forcing rework, I work with the team to figure out why and how to avoid this in the future. When other people's work is compromised, I take to the individuals and we work together to resolve and rectify the situation.
I am strong and confront things openly, but I do always try to speak in a respectful way. For example, someone yelled at me during a telephone conversation about an agenda item. In the meeting, we moved on, but after the meeting I sent the person an email explaining how yelling is not acceptable in my meetings and that I am doing my best to support this individual to ensure they get what they need from this project and I believe we can move forward working well together. The person immediately called me and apologized and we have enjoyed a better working relationship since. Sometimes you have to say hard things - but again I believe it can be wrapped in respect.
Dec 11, 2019 2:52 PM
Replying to Handirove Taruvinga
...
Great tips from this thread. I will surely apply some of the strategies.
Dear Handirove
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

What specific techniques or approaches do you refer to?
People don’t usually do not like to here anything negative, even when it is constructive. I prefer to use the “Oreo” method. I start with some positive feedback, then provide the negative, then close with positive. It softens any negative criticism. If the issue is serious, then I believe it’s best to not sugar coat and just get straight to the issue at hand.
...
2 replies by James Gaskins and Luis Branco
Dec 12, 2019 7:26 AM
Luis Branco
...
Dear James
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

You wrote: "If the issue is serious, then I believe it's best to not sugar coat and just get straight to the issue at hand"

Can you talk a little more about your approach?
Dec 13, 2019 7:49 AM
James Gaskins
...
I believe when providing feedback on minor or serious issues it is best to be constructive. I want help the person see where they need to improve, why making those improvements is important, and what is expected to resolve the problem. So with this come both a critique and a solution. I want to explain exactly what the problem(s) are, the implications, and create a plan to help the employee improve.
Dec 11, 2019 4:28 PM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear Lori
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Very interesting what you wrote: "When I give feedback, my technique is to speak carefully and respectfully. Treat the other person the way I would want to be treated. This goes for praise and for constructive feedback."

Do you usually use this approach in all situations?

When, for example:
- Objectives are not achieved
- Systematic errors are made forcing rework.
- other people's work is compromised
- Other unpleasant situations

Do you use any specific techniques to give feedback?
Hello Luis: Yes, I do try to use this approach in all situations and it is how I try to live my life. When objectives are not achieved, I try to go to the root cause. When systematic errors are made forcing rework, I work with the team to figure out why and how to avoid this in the future. When other people's work is compromised, I take to the individuals and we work together to resolve and rectify the situation.
I am strong and confront things openly, but I do always try to speak in a respectful way. For example, someone yelled at me during a telephone conversation about an agenda item. In the meeting, we moved on, but after the meeting I sent the person an email explaining how yelling is not acceptable in my meetings and that I am doing my best to support this individual to ensure they get what they need from this project and I believe we can move forward working well together. The person immediately called me and apologized and we have enjoyed a better working relationship since. Sometimes you have to say hard things - but again I believe it can be wrapped in respect.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Dec 12, 2019 7:31 AM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Lori
Thanks for your feedback
Very inspiring approach

Can you take this approach consistently?

What results have you obtained overall with this approach?
Dec 11, 2019 6:08 PM
Replying to James Gaskins
...
People don’t usually do not like to here anything negative, even when it is constructive. I prefer to use the “Oreo” method. I start with some positive feedback, then provide the negative, then close with positive. It softens any negative criticism. If the issue is serious, then I believe it’s best to not sugar coat and just get straight to the issue at hand.
Dear James
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

You wrote: "If the issue is serious, then I believe it's best to not sugar coat and just get straight to the issue at hand"

Can you talk a little more about your approach?
Dec 11, 2019 7:31 PM
Replying to LORI WILSON
...
Hello Luis: Yes, I do try to use this approach in all situations and it is how I try to live my life. When objectives are not achieved, I try to go to the root cause. When systematic errors are made forcing rework, I work with the team to figure out why and how to avoid this in the future. When other people's work is compromised, I take to the individuals and we work together to resolve and rectify the situation.
I am strong and confront things openly, but I do always try to speak in a respectful way. For example, someone yelled at me during a telephone conversation about an agenda item. In the meeting, we moved on, but after the meeting I sent the person an email explaining how yelling is not acceptable in my meetings and that I am doing my best to support this individual to ensure they get what they need from this project and I believe we can move forward working well together. The person immediately called me and apologized and we have enjoyed a better working relationship since. Sometimes you have to say hard things - but again I believe it can be wrapped in respect.
Dear Lori
Thanks for your feedback
Very inspiring approach

Can you take this approach consistently?

What results have you obtained overall with this approach?
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