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Topics: Communications Management, Talent Management, Teams
How do you give feedback?
When giving feedback do you use any specific technique?
What results do you achieve using these techniques?
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Dec 11, 2019 6:08 PM
Replying to James Gaskins
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People don’t usually do not like to here anything negative, even when it is constructive. I prefer to use the “Oreo” method. I start with some positive feedback, then provide the negative, then close with positive. It softens any negative criticism. If the issue is serious, then I believe it’s best to not sugar coat and just get straight to the issue at hand.
I believe when providing feedback on minor or serious issues it is best to be constructive. I want help the person see where they need to improve, why making those improvements is important, and what is expected to resolve the problem. So with this come both a critique and a solution. I want to explain exactly what the problem(s) are, the implications, and create a plan to help the employee improve.
Dear Luis,

There is a technique we use here in our team. Periodical feedbacks. There are 3 things to take into account when giving feedbaks:
1 - Situation: when the fact happens, including exactly the description of the person´s behaviour when it occurred;
2 - Behaviour: describe what happened, what were his/her attitudes, but do not include your personal opinion. Just facts.
3 - Impact: what were the impacts of his/her behaviour, how people react.
This technique is based on facts instead of personal opinion. Feedback should be specific instead of generic, based on observed behaviour and never on judments.

Hope it helped.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Dec 13, 2019 10:54 AM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Camila
Thank you for participating in this reflection and in your opinion.

Very interesting what you wrote:

"1. This technique is based on facts instead of personal opinion.
2. Feedback should be specific instead of generic, based on observed behavior and never on judgments. "

Can you do this systematically?
I received some good advice on giving feedback, years ago.

First, ask permission. Say "May I give you some feedback?" or something similar. The point is to prepare the other person for what you're about so say, and let them know that it's for their benefit. If the other person says no, then don't waste your time. If the person says yes, then they have purposely invited your feedback and should be less defensive. (I'm guilty of skipping this step when people report directly to me, because part of my job is to give them feedback.)

Second, be specific. Describe the situation, the person's actions, and the result. Instead of saying "You're always angry and it's hurting the team," for example, say "When you shouted in the meeting, this morning, no one answered, and I couldn't get any more opinions. I need your opinion, but I believe others were frightened by your tone and I now have to meet with them individually to hear their opinion."
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Dec 13, 2019 11:01 AM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Wade
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Interesting what he wrote: "Be specific. Describe the situation, the person's actions and the outcome"

Any recommendations on paralanguage?
What about body language?
Dec 13, 2019 9:08 AM
Replying to Camila Lousada
...
Dear Luis,

There is a technique we use here in our team. Periodical feedbacks. There are 3 things to take into account when giving feedbaks:
1 - Situation: when the fact happens, including exactly the description of the person´s behaviour when it occurred;
2 - Behaviour: describe what happened, what were his/her attitudes, but do not include your personal opinion. Just facts.
3 - Impact: what were the impacts of his/her behaviour, how people react.
This technique is based on facts instead of personal opinion. Feedback should be specific instead of generic, based on observed behaviour and never on judments.

Hope it helped.
Dear Camila
Thank you for participating in this reflection and in your opinion.

Very interesting what you wrote:

"1. This technique is based on facts instead of personal opinion.
2. Feedback should be specific instead of generic, based on observed behavior and never on judgments. "

Can you do this systematically?
...
1 reply by Camila Lousada
Dec 13, 2019 1:52 PM
Camila Lousada
...
Luis,

You can find more information about this technique acessing: https://www.ccl.org/articles/leading-effec...ent-and-impact/

I practice it with my team systematically. The results are very good.
Dec 13, 2019 9:45 AM
Replying to Wade Harshman
...
I received some good advice on giving feedback, years ago.

First, ask permission. Say "May I give you some feedback?" or something similar. The point is to prepare the other person for what you're about so say, and let them know that it's for their benefit. If the other person says no, then don't waste your time. If the person says yes, then they have purposely invited your feedback and should be less defensive. (I'm guilty of skipping this step when people report directly to me, because part of my job is to give them feedback.)

Second, be specific. Describe the situation, the person's actions, and the result. Instead of saying "You're always angry and it's hurting the team," for example, say "When you shouted in the meeting, this morning, no one answered, and I couldn't get any more opinions. I need your opinion, but I believe others were frightened by your tone and I now have to meet with them individually to hear their opinion."
Dear Wade
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Interesting what he wrote: "Be specific. Describe the situation, the person's actions and the outcome"

Any recommendations on paralanguage?
What about body language?
Dec 11, 2019 6:34 AM
Replying to Daire Guiney
...
I think 'as you go' feedback is the more important and not waiting for a specific meeting, point in the project plan, annual review or and other timed metric in order to give feedback in relation to aspects of the project. This approach also removes the failure to report on any serious issue or just "letting things slide" thinking. This type of feedback can take the form of a serious of question in order to clarify approach to particular project. An active engagement with all the moving parts in the project is required so that you have a wide and deep knowledge of the project in order to give valuable insight and constructive feedback to those that require it.
Regardless of the amount of experience a project manager has, new projects always through up new problems that require project managers to reflect on the approach, methodology, project team or any other aspect of the project in order to overcome a setback, hurdle or roadblock. As a result honest, constructive and open debate will encourage those in the know to give their feedback as to the direction of the project.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Dec 13, 2019 12:58 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Daire
Thanks for your feedback

Very interesting what he wrote: "As a result honest, constructive and open debate will encourage those in the know to give their feedback as the direction of the project"

Are there specific skills for giving feedback?
Dec 13, 2019 12:42 PM
Replying to Daire Guiney
...
Regardless of the amount of experience a project manager has, new projects always through up new problems that require project managers to reflect on the approach, methodology, project team or any other aspect of the project in order to overcome a setback, hurdle or roadblock. As a result honest, constructive and open debate will encourage those in the know to give their feedback as to the direction of the project.
Dear Daire
Thanks for your feedback

Very interesting what he wrote: "As a result honest, constructive and open debate will encourage those in the know to give their feedback as the direction of the project"

Are there specific skills for giving feedback?
...
1 reply by Daire Guiney
Dec 13, 2019 2:11 PM
Daire Guiney
...
First you are calling it feedback as apposed to criticism so as a result you must approach it a positive manner where you have identified the shortcoming or failing with a project team member and are bringing it to their attention. A structured approach with the behaviour input, associated impact as a result of this approach and an output that being what they can do differently. This approach works well for minor personality behaviour modifications that maybe required for a project team member.
Dec 13, 2019 10:54 AM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear Camila
Thank you for participating in this reflection and in your opinion.

Very interesting what you wrote:

"1. This technique is based on facts instead of personal opinion.
2. Feedback should be specific instead of generic, based on observed behavior and never on judgments. "

Can you do this systematically?
Luis,

You can find more information about this technique acessing: https://www.ccl.org/articles/leading-effec...ent-and-impact/

I practice it with my team systematically. The results are very good.
Dec 13, 2019 12:58 PM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear Daire
Thanks for your feedback

Very interesting what he wrote: "As a result honest, constructive and open debate will encourage those in the know to give their feedback as the direction of the project"

Are there specific skills for giving feedback?
First you are calling it feedback as apposed to criticism so as a result you must approach it a positive manner where you have identified the shortcoming or failing with a project team member and are bringing it to their attention. A structured approach with the behaviour input, associated impact as a result of this approach and an output that being what they can do differently. This approach works well for minor personality behaviour modifications that maybe required for a project team member.
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