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Is change evaluation a part of the process "perform integrated change control"?
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When talking about perform integrated change control and overall change control process, we always tell that we need to have a formal-written change request from external stakeholders, and then evaluate the request to make the decision; or have a change from team members, evaluate it first, then write it down and put it for approval.
But what is then meaning of change request as an input for process 4.6 of PMBOK? Does it contain the evaluation (schedule, cost, resources, risks,etc.) or we just evaluate it during 4.6?
Some people told me that the same group of people get the evalutaion done and approve them. I consider it impossible.
What's your point or your idea of training this point?
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It does not matter the source of change. What matters is the input, the process to transform the input, and the output. Project manager is accountable for the needed actives to create all the information needed to put it on hands of people that will take the decision, leading the conference or whatever defined to evaluate the information and taking the decision, and to implement and publish the change.
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1 reply by Yan Wu
Dec 03, 2019 9:59 PM
Yan Wu
...
Thanks for you reply, Sergio.
So you mentioned about any formal change request need to be applied to the project manager, and pm will leader the analyze and make a decision. Got it somehow.
Network:2860



Dear Yan
Interesting your question

Thanks for sharing

Who approves change requests?
The Change Control Board and, in some circumstances, the Project Manager if granted such privileges

If there is no formal change request that has to be approved, what would happen to the project?
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1 reply by Yan Wu
Dec 03, 2019 10:16 PM
Yan Wu
...
Thanks for your reply, Luis.
It looks like I didn't understand how an informal change came into being.
Among the answers I get so far, I got a general idea as follows:
- for a formal change, any stakeholder can raise a CR, then it comes to 4.6, we evaluate it, and get it approved by the authorized ones,
- for a informal change, mainly team members raise an idea, pm gives an overall thought about wether it is possible, and go to 4.6 if possible. A written CR can be filled any time before the final decision about CR is made.

Does things happen this way?
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Yan -

This depends on the change control model defined for the specific project and also the nature of the specific change. Some changes might be evaluated by the requestor themselves whereas others require evaluation separate from the request. The latter would then be performed by the Perform Integrated Change Control process.

If the governance model is for the customer or sponsor to approve Change Requests then a CR submitted by them could be self-approved once the impact analysis has been completed by the team.

Kiron
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1 reply by Yan Wu
Dec 03, 2019 10:21 PM
Yan Wu
...
Thanks for your reply, Kiron.
In real world, we respect the fact.
I just confused about how we discuss about the CR we sent to 4.6.
Things turns better with your idea.
A little further: when stakeholders evalute the CR themselves, do team need to have a indepent evaluation before approval by themselves? Or team just need to replan their project after the approval?
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Yan Wu,

I have seen in practice 4 roles involved in change management:

1. the requestor who asks for the change and might be required to give a justification (business case)

2. the evaluator or assessor, which might be several roles depending on subject matter expertise, and who assess the impact of the change on the overall system (architecture), cost, schedule, risk etc. This might include a quality review of the assessment.

3. the appropriate change control board CCB who makes the decision about the change (if there is a hierarchy of change decision authority there might be several CCBs, I have seen project manager-project change board-Steering Committee)

4. the project manager or the PMO who maintains the change logs and makes sure the other roles deliver

It is good practice to have a check and balance and hence assign the 4 roles to different individuals.
...
1 reply by Yan Wu
Dec 03, 2019 10:24 PM
Yan Wu
...
Thanks for the detailed introduction, Thomas. You did show me a new point of view!
Maybe I need to draw a new role-based flow chart on 4.6 to renew my knowledge here and now.
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The PMBOK is written to cover all cases from the largest to the smallest so in reality not everything applies every time.

Not all changes require a formal request or approval. What is required depends on the organization's standards, and the specifics of the change. Consider a very small change early in a project. It might be within the authority of a work group to make that change on their own authority.

To decide that they can make the change without any other approver requires that they actually reviewed it themselves to determine that it meets the organization's requirements. It is still an integrated change, because you decided that no external impacts mean no further integration is necessary. Even if another group must authorize the change, ALL changes must be reviewed by the party requesting the change before they are presented to anyone else for review.

You woudn't ask someone else to review your work before first checking it for errors. If a change had to go through multiple boards such as team level, functional level, and executive level, each reviews their own change request prior to moving to the next level. Often, there may be a checklist or some set of requirements such as cost data, schedule impact, etc. that accompany the change request.

In fact, how well you review your own work will set the expectations for how much others feel they need to review it. If you always go to a change board with all important aspects considered, you will have more trust and get less oversight over time than if you are someone who requests changes with many open questions.
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1 reply by Yan Wu
Dec 03, 2019 10:32 PM
Yan Wu
...
Great many thanks to your detailed explaination, and got clearer about how to explain the communication to stakeholders during change control flow. See, I used to pratice it the very same way, but don't got a clue about how to train it in PMP training:)
Really appreciate your sharing!
Network:413



Dear Yan

A change can be requested by any stakeholder.

the impact of change on project objectives is evaluated by the project team

the CCB gives approval

so change request is input to 4.6 Perform ICC and approved CR is output
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1 reply by Yan Wu
Dec 03, 2019 10:35 PM
Yan Wu
...
Thanks for your reply, Komal.
You're right, it's clear what 4.6 does. I just confused about when CR comes to 4.6, what we are willing to do. I wonder if when a CR goest to 4.6, we want a decision right away, so we need to finish the evaluation before 4,6.
Network:53



Dec 02, 2019 4:51 AM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
...
It does not matter the source of change. What matters is the input, the process to transform the input, and the output. Project manager is accountable for the needed actives to create all the information needed to put it on hands of people that will take the decision, leading the conference or whatever defined to evaluate the information and taking the decision, and to implement and publish the change.
Thanks for you reply, Sergio.
So you mentioned about any formal change request need to be applied to the project manager, and pm will leader the analyze and make a decision. Got it somehow.
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Dec 04, 2019 4:49 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
You are welcome. Not exactly. What I said is the PM is accountable for running the defined project change mangement process.
Network:53



Dec 02, 2019 5:23 AM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear Yan
Interesting your question

Thanks for sharing

Who approves change requests?
The Change Control Board and, in some circumstances, the Project Manager if granted such privileges

If there is no formal change request that has to be approved, what would happen to the project?
Thanks for your reply, Luis.
It looks like I didn't understand how an informal change came into being.
Among the answers I get so far, I got a general idea as follows:
- for a formal change, any stakeholder can raise a CR, then it comes to 4.6, we evaluate it, and get it approved by the authorized ones,
- for a informal change, mainly team members raise an idea, pm gives an overall thought about wether it is possible, and go to 4.6 if possible. A written CR can be filled any time before the final decision about CR is made.

Does things happen this way?
Network:53



Dec 02, 2019 7:56 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Yan -

This depends on the change control model defined for the specific project and also the nature of the specific change. Some changes might be evaluated by the requestor themselves whereas others require evaluation separate from the request. The latter would then be performed by the Perform Integrated Change Control process.

If the governance model is for the customer or sponsor to approve Change Requests then a CR submitted by them could be self-approved once the impact analysis has been completed by the team.

Kiron
Thanks for your reply, Kiron.
In real world, we respect the fact.
I just confused about how we discuss about the CR we sent to 4.6.
Things turns better with your idea.
A little further: when stakeholders evalute the CR themselves, do team need to have a indepent evaluation before approval by themselves? Or team just need to replan their project after the approval?
Network:53



Dec 02, 2019 8:45 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Yan Wu,

I have seen in practice 4 roles involved in change management:

1. the requestor who asks for the change and might be required to give a justification (business case)

2. the evaluator or assessor, which might be several roles depending on subject matter expertise, and who assess the impact of the change on the overall system (architecture), cost, schedule, risk etc. This might include a quality review of the assessment.

3. the appropriate change control board CCB who makes the decision about the change (if there is a hierarchy of change decision authority there might be several CCBs, I have seen project manager-project change board-Steering Committee)

4. the project manager or the PMO who maintains the change logs and makes sure the other roles deliver

It is good practice to have a check and balance and hence assign the 4 roles to different individuals.
Thanks for the detailed introduction, Thomas. You did show me a new point of view!
Maybe I need to draw a new role-based flow chart on 4.6 to renew my knowledge here and now.
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