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Topics: Portfolio Management, Using PMI Standards
PMI Project Management Hours
Network:91



Quick question for the group.

I’ve been an IT Professional for several years now and currently an IT Consultant. However, I would like to take my career to the next level. I want to apply and sit for the PMP exam but I don’t think I enough project hours (or even know how many hours I have).

I was in the US Army back in 2003 as a Telecommunication Specialist and served for 4 years. While in service, we work on many different projects. However, I never kept track of the hours I was accumulating. Is there anyone with military experience that can tell me if they used their project experience from the military to successfully sit for the PMP exam?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Network:1703



Victor -

Unfortunately, the PMP application requires you to submit experience from the past eight years so work that you did in 2003-2007 would not fall within that time period. Would you have enough hours in the 2011-2019 time period to apply?

BTW, education hours don't have a time limit.

Kiron
...
1 reply by Victor Ginoba
Dec 02, 2019 2:23 PM
Victor Ginoba
...
Kiron,

Thanks for the response. And I don't think I would have enough project hours between 11 and 19 either. But just curious, how do you go about rounding up project experience?
Network:71



Check the PMI Handbook: https://www.pmi.org/-/media/pmi/documents/...02-55acd5f6aa77

On page 6 it delineates two possibilities -- one with less than a Bachelor's degree and the other with a Bachelor's degree or greater. The experience needs to either cover 7500 hours within 5 years or 4500 hours within 3 years.

I believe the experience must be dated back from the application submittal date (need to verify that). As long as it is project experience, it does not matter what the occupation is.

You may want to start with the CAPM certification since it has less requirements.
...
1 reply by Victor Ginoba
Dec 02, 2019 3:13 PM
Victor Ginoba
...
Hi James,

Thanks for the comment. I would be working with the 4500 hrs. And I've considered the CAPM but last time I checked that cert only lasts for five yrs. I'm ok with waiting until I having enough project hours for the PMP.
Network:91



Dec 02, 2019 1:57 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Victor -

Unfortunately, the PMP application requires you to submit experience from the past eight years so work that you did in 2003-2007 would not fall within that time period. Would you have enough hours in the 2011-2019 time period to apply?

BTW, education hours don't have a time limit.

Kiron
Kiron,

Thanks for the response. And I don't think I would have enough project hours between 11 and 19 either. But just curious, how do you go about rounding up project experience?
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Dec 02, 2019 4:29 PM
Kiron Bondale
...
Sorry Victor -

Can you clarify what you mean by "rounding up project experience"?

Determining time spent is often a function of the start/end dates and the time you spent during that elapsed time. If audited, this can be substantiated based on feedback from the reference you provided for a given project and/or timesheets.

Kiron
Network:91



Dec 02, 2019 2:19 PM
Replying to James Shields
...
Check the PMI Handbook: https://www.pmi.org/-/media/pmi/documents/...02-55acd5f6aa77

On page 6 it delineates two possibilities -- one with less than a Bachelor's degree and the other with a Bachelor's degree or greater. The experience needs to either cover 7500 hours within 5 years or 4500 hours within 3 years.

I believe the experience must be dated back from the application submittal date (need to verify that). As long as it is project experience, it does not matter what the occupation is.

You may want to start with the CAPM certification since it has less requirements.
Hi James,

Thanks for the comment. I would be working with the 4500 hrs. And I've considered the CAPM but last time I checked that cert only lasts for five yrs. I'm ok with waiting until I having enough project hours for the PMP.
...
1 reply by Komal Mathur
Dec 02, 2019 5:31 PM
Komal Mathur
...
Hi Victor,
The CAPM is good choice for professionals that dont meet the PM hours criteria. Its a great firstep in a career in PM

Good luck
Network:1703



Dec 02, 2019 2:23 PM
Replying to Victor Ginoba
...
Kiron,

Thanks for the response. And I don't think I would have enough project hours between 11 and 19 either. But just curious, how do you go about rounding up project experience?
Sorry Victor -

Can you clarify what you mean by "rounding up project experience"?

Determining time spent is often a function of the start/end dates and the time you spent during that elapsed time. If audited, this can be substantiated based on feedback from the reference you provided for a given project and/or timesheets.

Kiron
...
1 reply by Victor Ginoba
Dec 02, 2019 5:01 PM
Victor Ginoba
...
Hi Kiron,

Sorry, I meant to say project "hours". However, It looks like Keith did a good job explain this in his response.
Network:364



A standard work year is 2000 hours (50w * 40hrs) and a typical full time employee dedicated to a project works about 1600 hours (80%) of their time on it when you consider vacations, non-project meetings, training, etc.

If you were a full time PM, the 1600/yr would be a good ROM. If you worked part of your time as a PM and part supporting other things, you could develop a rough percentage of time for how much of that was you PM role.
...
1 reply by Victor Ginoba
Dec 02, 2019 5:02 PM
Victor Ginoba
...
Thanks Keith. That makes a whole lot of sense.
Network:91



Dec 02, 2019 4:29 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Sorry Victor -

Can you clarify what you mean by "rounding up project experience"?

Determining time spent is often a function of the start/end dates and the time you spent during that elapsed time. If audited, this can be substantiated based on feedback from the reference you provided for a given project and/or timesheets.

Kiron
Hi Kiron,

Sorry, I meant to say project "hours". However, It looks like Keith did a good job explain this in his response.
Network:91



Dec 02, 2019 4:41 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
A standard work year is 2000 hours (50w * 40hrs) and a typical full time employee dedicated to a project works about 1600 hours (80%) of their time on it when you consider vacations, non-project meetings, training, etc.

If you were a full time PM, the 1600/yr would be a good ROM. If you worked part of your time as a PM and part supporting other things, you could develop a rough percentage of time for how much of that was you PM role.
Thanks Keith. That makes a whole lot of sense.
Network:1937



A common rule of tumb is the 40-20-40 rule. 20 is for construction of the solution. The others for previous and post construction phases.
Network:412



Dec 02, 2019 3:13 PM
Replying to Victor Ginoba
...
Hi James,

Thanks for the comment. I would be working with the 4500 hrs. And I've considered the CAPM but last time I checked that cert only lasts for five yrs. I'm ok with waiting until I having enough project hours for the PMP.
Hi Victor,
The CAPM is good choice for professionals that dont meet the PM hours criteria. Its a great firstep in a career in PM

Good luck

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