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Is there any difference between project management plan and project execution plan?
I was working on a Project Execution Plan for an EPC Project and a team member asked me, what is the difference between Project Management Plan and Project Execution Plan? Please share your thoughts.
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Dear Mujahid
Interesting your question
Thanks for sharing

In your opinion is there a difference between Project Management Plan and Project Execution Plan?

What are the differences in your opinion?
In my view, the project execution plan sets out the strategy for managing the project, describes the policies, procedures and priorities that will be adopted for the project.While Project management Plan is the planning document, capturing the entire project end-to-end, covering all project phases, from initiation through planning, execution and closure. 
The project execution plan describes what you will do. The project management plan describes how you will do it.
Dear Mujahid
What name do you give to this document that the PMBOK Guide refers to: "The Project Management Plan is a document that describes how the project will be executed, monitored and controlled, and closed.
Integrates and consolidates all ancillary management plans, baselines and other information needed to manage the project.
Project needs determine which components of the project management plan are needed "

(PMBOK Guide 6th Edition p.86)
Take the word "Project" out of it for a moment. There's a big difference between "execution" and "management." It's almost like asking how a team plays vs asking how a team is coached.

Project execution is a fancy way to say "doing the project work." A project execution plan isn't something PMI defines, but if you have one, it should outline how a project team intends to complete the work. By contrast, a project management plan also describes the way the project will be monitored and controlled, and closed. (PMBOK6 paragraph 4.2.3.1)
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1 reply by Thomas Walenta
May 08, 2020 11:46 AM
Thomas Walenta
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Wade, very well explained
I have seen the terms used different ways and some other terms used to describe a PEP as well such as a SEMP (Systems Eng. Mgmt. Plan).

In the common usage I have seen, a PEP includes the processes, requirements (e.g. specifications) that will be used to execute the project. For example: where a project management plan would include verification of requirements as planned work, a PEP would describe how the verification will be performed. In this way, the document covers a combination of PM and BA (or SE) planning.
Dearest:
What is the interpretation you give:
"EXECUTING PROCESS GROUP
The Executing Process Group consists of those processes performed to complete the work defined in the project management plan to satisfy the project requirements.
This Process Group involves coordinating resources, managing stakeholder engagement, and integrating and performing the activities of the project in accordance with the project management plan.
The key benefit of this Process Group is that the work needed to meet the project requirements and objectives are performed according to plan. "

Page 595
PMBOK Guide 6th Edition
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1 reply by Keith Novak
Dec 13, 2019 2:59 PM
Keith Novak
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Within the scope of the PMBOK, the process groups apply to the macro level project level process execution, not how to perform the underlying technical design functions.

"The Executing Process Group consists of those processes performed to complete the work defined in the project management plan to satisfy the project requirements."

That is not the same as the product requirements. If you look throughout the various process groups for example, you will see that the various types of documents described are project documents, not product definition documents. Where I have seen a PEP used differently is where it includes product level definition requirements and processes.

In practice, some terms are used differently between various organizations and not how they are defined by PMI. This is where I have seen variants of PM plan, PEP, SEMP, EMP, etc. used to describe the same things by different people or with some information added or omitted..
Dec 13, 2019 1:55 PM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dearest:
What is the interpretation you give:
"EXECUTING PROCESS GROUP
The Executing Process Group consists of those processes performed to complete the work defined in the project management plan to satisfy the project requirements.
This Process Group involves coordinating resources, managing stakeholder engagement, and integrating and performing the activities of the project in accordance with the project management plan.
The key benefit of this Process Group is that the work needed to meet the project requirements and objectives are performed according to plan. "

Page 595
PMBOK Guide 6th Edition
Within the scope of the PMBOK, the process groups apply to the macro level project level process execution, not how to perform the underlying technical design functions.

"The Executing Process Group consists of those processes performed to complete the work defined in the project management plan to satisfy the project requirements."

That is not the same as the product requirements. If you look throughout the various process groups for example, you will see that the various types of documents described are project documents, not product definition documents. Where I have seen a PEP used differently is where it includes product level definition requirements and processes.

In practice, some terms are used differently between various organizations and not how they are defined by PMI. This is where I have seen variants of PM plan, PEP, SEMP, EMP, etc. used to describe the same things by different people or with some information added or omitted..
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Dec 14, 2019 3:57 AM
Luis Branco
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Dear Keith
Thank you for your opinion

Are we talking about what companies do or PMI's proposal through the PMBOK Guide?

According to the PMBOK Guide, there are 5 process groups: Initiation, Planning, Execution, Monitoring and Control and Closure

In the Planning Processes, in addition to the Project Management Plan and the Management Plans in the different areas of knowledge ie "how to" is perfectly defined "what to do"

This is my understanding of the topic.
Dec 13, 2019 2:59 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
Within the scope of the PMBOK, the process groups apply to the macro level project level process execution, not how to perform the underlying technical design functions.

"The Executing Process Group consists of those processes performed to complete the work defined in the project management plan to satisfy the project requirements."

That is not the same as the product requirements. If you look throughout the various process groups for example, you will see that the various types of documents described are project documents, not product definition documents. Where I have seen a PEP used differently is where it includes product level definition requirements and processes.

In practice, some terms are used differently between various organizations and not how they are defined by PMI. This is where I have seen variants of PM plan, PEP, SEMP, EMP, etc. used to describe the same things by different people or with some information added or omitted..
Dear Keith
Thank you for your opinion

Are we talking about what companies do or PMI's proposal through the PMBOK Guide?

According to the PMBOK Guide, there are 5 process groups: Initiation, Planning, Execution, Monitoring and Control and Closure

In the Planning Processes, in addition to the Project Management Plan and the Management Plans in the different areas of knowledge ie "how to" is perfectly defined "what to do"

This is my understanding of the topic.
If you follow the PMI then there project execution plan do not exists as a term or entity inside the PMBOK and the lexicon of terms. Then forget about it. On the other side it has no sence because you execute what is planned. Remember that a project management plan must answered five main questions: what? when? who? how? how much it cost? so execution is covered into the project management plan.If you have a project management plan that do not answer those questions then you do not have a project management plan.
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