Project Management

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Topics: Leadership, Talent Management, Teams
Team Members Commitment and Project Management
What impact does team commitment have on Project Management and Project Outcomes?

The study “State of the Global Workplace, conducted by the Gallup consultancy, states that only 13% of employees worldwide are committed to what they do. It states: "Committed employees work with passion and feel a deep connection with their company, they drive innovation and make the organization move forward".

This means that just one in eight workers is "psychologically committed to their work and willing to make positive contributions to their organizations."
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The rest of the employees are either "not committed" (63%) or "actively unengaged" (24%). The latter are unhappy, unproductive and prone to spread negativity to their colleagues.
I wrote an article three years ago which said that successful teams were made of folks that had the 3 C's: capability, capacity & commitment.

A gap in any one of those will result in inferior outcomes.

However, as PMs we have significant influence over this even if the team members don't report to us. Whether you buy into Lencioni's Three Signs of a Miserable Job or the three drivers of intrinsic motivation from Daniel Pink's Drive, we can help to boost commitment in many cases.

Kiron
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2 replies by Luis Branco and Scott Theus
Jan 13, 2020 9:20 AM
Luis Branco
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Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Interesting what he wrote: "Successful teams were made of folks that had the 3 C's: capability, capacity & commitment"

Facts are facts (Gallup study results)

How can you get 3 C's people on your teams if, as a project manager, you don't even intervene in their recruitment and selection?
Jan 13, 2020 2:30 PM
Scott Theus
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Interesting...I also use a "Three C's" approach, but from a team perspective not individual levels of capability, capacity, and commitment.

My three are Collaboration, Cooperation, and Communication. I find that a team founded on these can overcome individual challenges; collaboration builds capability across the team, cooperation improves overall capacity, and communication helps keep everyone committed to the end goals.

Since I have never had direct reports and all my teams have been matrixed in to me with "dotted line" reporting structures I tend to focus at the team level C's and work with the resource manager(s) to identify and clear roadblocks based on the individual C's either through performance goals, coaching, or mentoring.
Jan 13, 2020 8:41 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
I wrote an article three years ago which said that successful teams were made of folks that had the 3 C's: capability, capacity & commitment.

A gap in any one of those will result in inferior outcomes.

However, as PMs we have significant influence over this even if the team members don't report to us. Whether you buy into Lencioni's Three Signs of a Miserable Job or the three drivers of intrinsic motivation from Daniel Pink's Drive, we can help to boost commitment in many cases.

Kiron
Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Interesting what he wrote: "Successful teams were made of folks that had the 3 C's: capability, capacity & commitment"

Facts are facts (Gallup study results)

How can you get 3 C's people on your teams if, as a project manager, you don't even intervene in their recruitment and selection?
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Jan 13, 2020 9:50 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
This is why you need to establish a good relationship with functional managers so you can get the first 2 C's addressed, and the 3rd one becomes a shared partnership with their people managers.

Kiron
Jan 13, 2020 9:20 AM
Replying to Luis Branco
...
Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

Interesting what he wrote: "Successful teams were made of folks that had the 3 C's: capability, capacity & commitment"

Facts are facts (Gallup study results)

How can you get 3 C's people on your teams if, as a project manager, you don't even intervene in their recruitment and selection?
This is why you need to establish a good relationship with functional managers so you can get the first 2 C's addressed, and the 3rd one becomes a shared partnership with their people managers.

Kiron
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Jan 13, 2020 9:58 AM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Kiron
Thank you for your opinion

Add outsourcing to team member services and increase complexity ... is the result even less compromised?
Jan 13, 2020 9:50 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
This is why you need to establish a good relationship with functional managers so you can get the first 2 C's addressed, and the 3rd one becomes a shared partnership with their people managers.

Kiron
Dear Kiron
Thank you for your opinion

Add outsourcing to team member services and increase complexity ... is the result even less compromised?
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Jan 13, 2020 3:41 PM
Kiron Bondale
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Luis -

can you clarify your question? Are you asking if outsourced team members are added to the mix whether things get more challenging? If so, definitely!

Kiron
1. This is what it is.
2. I agree with Kiron
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1 reply by Luis Branco
Jan 13, 2020 11:26 AM
Luis Branco
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Dear Abolfazl
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

I would like to understand your comment a little better
What do you agree with Kiron?
Jan 13, 2020 11:03 AM
Replying to Abolfazl Yousefi Darestani
...
1. This is what it is.
2. I agree with Kiron
Dear Abolfazl
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

I would like to understand your comment a little better
What do you agree with Kiron?
Hello Luis: The impact of team commitment on Project Outcomes and Project Management is enormous. The percentages you shared are staggering. If the team was responsible for emptying a garage and everyone was 100% committed, the work would get done quickly and efficiently. But if only 13% of the team were committed to doing the work, it would take much longer and there would be all kinds of influences and poor behaviors to deal with. Our role as the project manager is to influence and inspire the team to increase commitment from 13% to 100%. So many different things come to mind, but team building becomes important for success. Clear communication with the details team members need to understand the project tasks can move team members closer to full commitment. It also helps if they have trust in us as project managers. If the team already knows you this is easy, but if you are walking into a new team, this can be harder initially. Kiron is right about having strong and trusted relationships already built with functional managers, but sometimes we walk in brand new without that history yet. Kiron was exactly right in his 3C's approach. It takes all 3 of those things to be successful. If it was me, I would brainstorm ways to focus on and reach out to the 63% non-committed team members to help encourage them to move through the stages of change and become committed believers. Then I would work to bring over the unengaged 24%. Luis, I know you will ask me how.....so, these are a few things I would try: (1) Individually find out from each team member how successful they think the project will be and how important they believe their role in project is. (2) From this, I would work to address all concerns and seek to validate each person's important role on the team (3) I would look for ways to incorporate joy into the work and make sure each team members is supported and clearly communicated with about any changes or details needed to do their best work - working diligently to eliminate barriers or obstacles and creating ways to measure individual and team success - these things will increase the energy about reaching milestones and ultimate project success.
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2 replies by Luis Branco and Scott Theus
Jan 13, 2020 12:16 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Lori
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

It's really challenging to do what you propose

On the other hand ... will there be time left for project management (I don't mean leadership)?
Jan 13, 2020 5:16 PM
Scott Theus
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Hi Luis,

I would argue that if you don’t put the time into something like what Lori suggests then you won’t have a project to manage for long. Allow me to elaborate: What happens to a project when only 13% if the project team is committed to doing a good job and delivering a successful product? The team will be constantly overworked, faced with quality issues, costs will go up and timelines will be extended from deadlines missed. In my experience that is when a project manager gets replaced.

However, if one were to take the extra time to increase commitment levels and focus the team on working together as a team through driving the Team C’s rather than as a set of individuals then, over time, the Individual C’s will improve across the board and the project will begin to move into the green.

-Scott
Luis

Team commitment is vital for project success, and although the PM can control any issues to a certain extent, yet, it won’t be as ideal as having a team commitment and buy-in. It builds a culture of trust and maturity in the organization.

To achieve high level of commitment, I guess the team has to have a certain comfort level and motivation (Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs).

RK
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1 reply by Luis Branco
Jan 13, 2020 12:21 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Rami
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.

We agree that the commitment of the project team is vital to the success of the project.

Are we there meeting the needs of team members using the Maslow Needs Piramide model?

How will the needs for self-empowerment and personal valorization be met?
Or the status needs?
Luis,

This is a very interesting question. From my experience, commitment of team members can make or break a project and can stress or loosen the following knowledge areas: Project Stakeholder Management, Project Resource Management, and Project Communications Management.

Project management is an art as well as a science that's why it's the responsibility of the project manager to engage stakeholders and team members via motivating the team members to "commit" through team building activities, emotional intelligence, etc.

Having a highly committed team is not an easy task. Because loyalty can be influenced by the structure of the organisation, organisational culture, buy-in of team members of the project, existing policies, processes, and procedures. Bending and tailoring these influences for the team may be impossible in some or most organisations.

Zaid
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1 reply by Luis Branco
Jan 13, 2020 12:38 PM
Luis Branco
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Dear Zaid
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion.
We agree that the "commitment of team members can make or break a project"

Achieving the commitment of team members is a real challenge given the results of the Gallup study.
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