Project Management

Project Management Central

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Topics: Career Development, Organizational Culture, Talent Management
Japanese Project Management KPM - Innovation, development and Improvement
In KPM, the essential power of project management is twofold: the creativity supported by different kinds of knowledge brought together to overcome conservativeness, and the team power across the organization.(kaikaku).

What can we learn with this project management framework?
Is this framework widely adopted in Japan?
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Alexandre,
thanks for the explanation, I have learned something.
Feb 05, 2020 8:32 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Thanks for the explanation, Takeshi.
P2M is a methodology developed by PMAJ, the national japanese PM association, in its 3rd edition as of 2014. There is a good summary on their webpage.

The idea of project management (PMI) is based on US culture features as focus on achievement and individual responsibility. Both features do not exist everywhere on the globe.

Japanese culture shares the 1st (achievement) but replaces individual responsibility with shared responsibility (I once had a long discussion with a Japanese about who is responsible for a certain system, he neglected that motion and said, all team members are responsible).

P2M has a strong focus on achievement integrating project and program management. With that it avoids our discussion about where should benefits management be, program vs project management and competencies of project/program managers. In its earlier versions, is was more explicit about teaming and joint responsibilities.
Thomas

Tank you for participating in the discussion,. I'm pleased that you have some knowledge about the methodology, with the links i putted in the forum and your explanation i think the information should be enough for the community starting making their opinions.

PS: Has i work in a Portuguese branch of a Japanese company, I have to be prepared to this cultural differences and different frameworks.I thought that was interesting to the community know more about this specific different approaches and find someone that possesses the knowledge to help us be aware of the different cultural approaches.

Alexandre
Yes me too. I haven't heard of it before.
Feb 05, 2020 8:32 AM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Thanks for the explanation, Takeshi.
P2M is a methodology developed by PMAJ, the national japanese PM association, in its 3rd edition as of 2014. There is a good summary on their webpage.

The idea of project management (PMI) is based on US culture features as focus on achievement and individual responsibility. Both features do not exist everywhere on the globe.

Japanese culture shares the 1st (achievement) but replaces individual responsibility with shared responsibility (I once had a long discussion with a Japanese about who is responsible for a certain system, he neglected that motion and said, all team members are responsible).

P2M has a strong focus on achievement integrating project and program management. With that it avoids our discussion about where should benefits management be, program vs project management and competencies of project/program managers. In its earlier versions, is was more explicit about teaming and joint responsibilities.
Interesting discussion.
I am going to talk about Japanese culture.

There is a word "zentai-sekinin" in Japanese. This means that an issue is a team-wide issue and that the issue is responsible for all team members.

During the Middle Ages, Japanese introduced a system in which multiple households jointly managed one field during farming.
This is a system established to cover work when one household is ill or injured and cannot work on farming.
These households were jointly responsible for tax payments to the government.

In other words, this is also a system for stabilizing tax revenues, and I think that it is the basis for a culture in which multiple members take responsibility, such as paying taxes together.
...
1 reply by Elok Robert Tee
Feb 05, 2020 8:38 PM
Elok Robert Tee
...
Thank you Takeshi & Alexandre for the insights. Do you apply the ideals of Kodowari in kaikaku & kaizen? I am most interested in the How?
Feb 05, 2020 7:52 PM
Replying to Takeshi Miyaoka
...
Interesting discussion.
I am going to talk about Japanese culture.

There is a word "zentai-sekinin" in Japanese. This means that an issue is a team-wide issue and that the issue is responsible for all team members.

During the Middle Ages, Japanese introduced a system in which multiple households jointly managed one field during farming.
This is a system established to cover work when one household is ill or injured and cannot work on farming.
These households were jointly responsible for tax payments to the government.

In other words, this is also a system for stabilizing tax revenues, and I think that it is the basis for a culture in which multiple members take responsibility, such as paying taxes together.
Thank you Takeshi & Alexandre for the insights. Do you apply the ideals of Kodowari in kaikaku & kaizen? I am most interested in the How?
...
2 replies by Alexandre Costa and Takeshi Miyaoka
Feb 05, 2020 8:53 PM
Takeshi Miyaoka
...
Then, I would like to talk about "kaikaku" that I think.

Japan once experienced a revolution.
It means the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo era and the beginning of the Meiji era.
At that time, Japan's political system changed significantly from the rule of "samurai" to the rule of politicians brought by Western Europe.

However, the foundation of Japanese culture has not changed at all.
In other words, "kaikaku" has the meaning of transforming everything from the ground up without losing important identities.
On the other hand, "kaizen" is close to the idea behind Toyota's "kanban".
Feb 06, 2020 3:01 AM
Alexandre Costa
...
Hi Elok,

I am a big adept of kaizan, I think in the end we all are , we should always continuos improving. Did you know that there is a learning institute of kaizan, I am meditating if getting a certification in kaizan will be of great value or not for me.

Alexandre
Feb 05, 2020 8:38 PM
Replying to Elok Robert Tee
...
Thank you Takeshi & Alexandre for the insights. Do you apply the ideals of Kodowari in kaikaku & kaizen? I am most interested in the How?
Then, I would like to talk about "kaikaku" that I think.

Japan once experienced a revolution.
It means the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo era and the beginning of the Meiji era.
At that time, Japan's political system changed significantly from the rule of "samurai" to the rule of politicians brought by Western Europe.

However, the foundation of Japanese culture has not changed at all.
In other words, "kaikaku" has the meaning of transforming everything from the ground up without losing important identities.
On the other hand, "kaizen" is close to the idea behind Toyota's "kanban".
...
2 replies by Elok Robert Tee and Kiron Bondale
Feb 05, 2020 9:38 PM
Elok Robert Tee
...
Let me frame my understanding .. in transformation of whatever it may be, whether from ground-up or in patiently-small increments, once the mind is set the principles of relentless pursuit for excellence will apply. I like this because the thinking emphasizes keeping what is important for the community (corporation). Today we have lost & forgotten so much of our common (& local) heritage & identities that we struggle to bring people together & sustain what is remaining :-P
Feb 06, 2020 12:34 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
That is fascinating - it sounds like Kaikaku is much more of a revolution but preserves the principle of respecting where you start from which Kanban asserts.
Feb 05, 2020 8:53 PM
Replying to Takeshi Miyaoka
...
Then, I would like to talk about "kaikaku" that I think.

Japan once experienced a revolution.
It means the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo era and the beginning of the Meiji era.
At that time, Japan's political system changed significantly from the rule of "samurai" to the rule of politicians brought by Western Europe.

However, the foundation of Japanese culture has not changed at all.
In other words, "kaikaku" has the meaning of transforming everything from the ground up without losing important identities.
On the other hand, "kaizen" is close to the idea behind Toyota's "kanban".
Let me frame my understanding .. in transformation of whatever it may be, whether from ground-up or in patiently-small increments, once the mind is set the principles of relentless pursuit for excellence will apply. I like this because the thinking emphasizes keeping what is important for the community (corporation). Today we have lost & forgotten so much of our common (& local) heritage & identities that we struggle to bring people together & sustain what is remaining :-P
...
1 reply by Takeshi Miyaoka
Feb 05, 2020 10:20 PM
Takeshi Miyaoka
...
I believe that standardizing everything in a uniform format and making it manual is effective in ensuring a certain level of quality for the deliverables.
The project management framework teaches us how to achieve better success.But that doesn't mean we can use these frameworks straightforwardly.
I think that the same framework can be used in various ways depending on who uses it.
Because I and you both have personality, I think it is good that there is a way to use the framework according to personality.
Identity lies in personality. Respect for individuality will protect our identity.
Feb 05, 2020 9:38 PM
Replying to Elok Robert Tee
...
Let me frame my understanding .. in transformation of whatever it may be, whether from ground-up or in patiently-small increments, once the mind is set the principles of relentless pursuit for excellence will apply. I like this because the thinking emphasizes keeping what is important for the community (corporation). Today we have lost & forgotten so much of our common (& local) heritage & identities that we struggle to bring people together & sustain what is remaining :-P
I believe that standardizing everything in a uniform format and making it manual is effective in ensuring a certain level of quality for the deliverables.
The project management framework teaches us how to achieve better success.But that doesn't mean we can use these frameworks straightforwardly.
I think that the same framework can be used in various ways depending on who uses it.
Because I and you both have personality, I think it is good that there is a way to use the framework according to personality.
Identity lies in personality. Respect for individuality will protect our identity.
Feb 05, 2020 8:53 PM
Replying to Takeshi Miyaoka
...
Then, I would like to talk about "kaikaku" that I think.

Japan once experienced a revolution.
It means the end of the Tokugawa shogunate in the Edo era and the beginning of the Meiji era.
At that time, Japan's political system changed significantly from the rule of "samurai" to the rule of politicians brought by Western Europe.

However, the foundation of Japanese culture has not changed at all.
In other words, "kaikaku" has the meaning of transforming everything from the ground up without losing important identities.
On the other hand, "kaizen" is close to the idea behind Toyota's "kanban".
That is fascinating - it sounds like Kaikaku is much more of a revolution but preserves the principle of respecting where you start from which Kanban asserts.
...
1 reply by Takeshi Miyaoka
Feb 06, 2020 8:05 AM
Takeshi Miyaoka
...
Hi kiron,

I think your point of view is very good.
"kaikaku" has a stronger will and power than "kaizen".While “kaizen” respects harmony, “kaikaku” focuses on achieving the goal.
And "kai/?", a character common to "kai-kaku" and "kai-zen", means "modification".
What I mean is that we can't "modify" without a solid foundation.
In that sense, "destruction and creation" are different in nature.
Feb 05, 2020 8:38 PM
Replying to Elok Robert Tee
...
Thank you Takeshi & Alexandre for the insights. Do you apply the ideals of Kodowari in kaikaku & kaizen? I am most interested in the How?
Hi Elok,

I am a big adept of kaizan, I think in the end we all are , we should always continuos improving. Did you know that there is a learning institute of kaizan, I am meditating if getting a certification in kaizan will be of great value or not for me.

Alexandre
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Feb 06, 2020 4:13 AM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Alexandre
The Kaizen Institute, in Portugal, only provides training for people from companies in which they have consultancy interventions
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