Project Management

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Topics: Career Development, Leadership, Talent Management
Perfect Project Manager
What are, in your opinion, the multiple skills, abilities and traits of his work?
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Luis -

I'd argue that perfection is impossible for a PM as such a being would have the ability to manage any type of project of any level of complexity in any organization and industry at a consistent level of performance.

That simply is not possible.

However, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't strive to improve our competencies across all three legs of PMI's Talent Triangle, but with greater attention paid to the leadership/management skills side.

Kiron
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1 reply by Luis Branco
Feb 14, 2020 9:25 AM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion
Perfection is fleeting. Strive to be better, in some way, than the day before. Continue learning, developing, caring, and sharing on a daily basis.
Would also not limit to 'his' work. Can be anyone, yeah?
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1 reply by Luis Branco
Feb 14, 2020 9:25 AM
Luis Branco
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Dear Andrew
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion

It's Kaizen challenge: to continuously improve
My experience is in software development so I can only speak about that kind of work. The best PM is one who can make herself obsolete, by ensuring teams are self-organising and properly accountable to effective Product Owners and by switching the organisational focus to product work streams rather than projects.
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2 replies by Adrian Carlogea and Luis Branco
Feb 14, 2020 9:28 AM
Luis Branco
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Dear David
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion
Feb 15, 2020 12:47 PM
Adrian Carlogea
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Hi David,

I am not sure about switching the organizational focus to product work streams but ensuring the teams are self-organizing properly is, I think, the role of the Scrum Master and not that of the PM.

Many PMs also play the role of the Scrum Masters but this is not the rule. Some years ago I worked as a software developer for a software product development department and they did not have PMs but they did have the role of the Scrum Master.
As Kiron mentioned, perfection is impossible, however, leadership, communication, and management skills are really important.
...
1 reply by Luis Branco
Feb 14, 2020 9:28 AM
Luis Branco
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Dear Abolfazl
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion
Feb 14, 2020 7:14 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Luis -

I'd argue that perfection is impossible for a PM as such a being would have the ability to manage any type of project of any level of complexity in any organization and industry at a consistent level of performance.

That simply is not possible.

However, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't strive to improve our competencies across all three legs of PMI's Talent Triangle, but with greater attention paid to the leadership/management skills side.

Kiron
Dear Kiron
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion
Feb 14, 2020 7:39 AM
Replying to Andrew Craig
...
Perfection is fleeting. Strive to be better, in some way, than the day before. Continue learning, developing, caring, and sharing on a daily basis.
Would also not limit to 'his' work. Can be anyone, yeah?
Dear Andrew
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion

It's Kaizen challenge: to continuously improve
Feb 14, 2020 7:50 AM
Replying to David Portas
...
My experience is in software development so I can only speak about that kind of work. The best PM is one who can make herself obsolete, by ensuring teams are self-organising and properly accountable to effective Product Owners and by switching the organisational focus to product work streams rather than projects.
Dear David
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion
Feb 14, 2020 8:27 AM
Replying to Abolfazl Yousefi Darestani
...
As Kiron mentioned, perfection is impossible, however, leadership, communication, and management skills are really important.
Dear Abolfazl
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion
Management guru Tom Peters has his own take on value.
He ties it to the attributes of the perfect project manager.

In “Pursuing the Perfect Project Manager”, the perfect PM brings multiple skills, abilities and traits to his job.
He must “command coach” and deal with paradox.

Most importantly, he must have the following eight traits:

1. Total ego/no ego. Peters says PMs must be consumed by a project. They must invest their egos in the job and “become the project. But in order to deal with diverse projects, they “must also have no ego at all.”

2. Autocrat/delegator. When the pressure builds, they must take over and confidently run the show, never questioning their snap decisions. They must be “masterful delegators,” says Peters, and must “own the problem.”

3. Leader/manager. Along with the confidence to confidently manage projects, Peters adds that PMs “are only as good as their teammates’ commitment, energy and diverse skills.” They must also be leaders, which this management consultant defines as “visionaries and invigorators.”

4. Tolerate ambiguity/pursue perfection. Here is my favorite. According to Peters, complex projects are all about ambiguity. The only definite, he says, is the “unexpected.” Effective PMs must “handle equivocality with élan and a sense of humor.”

5. Oral/written. The ordinary worker has either “an oral or a ‘put in writing’ bias,” says Peters. But top PMs must have both.

6. Acknowledge complexity/champion simplicity. At the same time first-rate PMs must be accomplished multi-taskers. They must be “‘Keep It Simple, Stupid’ fanatics -- making sure that a few, essential values dominate the organization.”

7. Think big/think small. Ideally, PMs must “appreciate forests and trees,” according to Peters. Translated, they must see the big and small picture clearly.

8. Impatient/patient. And lastly, they must understand people and know how to deal with “fragile egos, multiple cultures and complex relationships.”
Feb 14, 2020 7:50 AM
Replying to David Portas
...
My experience is in software development so I can only speak about that kind of work. The best PM is one who can make herself obsolete, by ensuring teams are self-organising and properly accountable to effective Product Owners and by switching the organisational focus to product work streams rather than projects.
Hi David,

I am not sure about switching the organizational focus to product work streams but ensuring the teams are self-organizing properly is, I think, the role of the Scrum Master and not that of the PM.

Many PMs also play the role of the Scrum Masters but this is not the rule. Some years ago I worked as a software developer for a software product development department and they did not have PMs but they did have the role of the Scrum Master.
...
2 replies by David Portas and Luis Branco
Feb 15, 2020 1:36 PM
Luis Branco
...
Dear Adrian
Thank you for participating in this reflection and for your opinion

What do you think about what Tom Peters wrote?
Feb 15, 2020 11:14 PM
David Portas
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Adrian, very true. If the PM's role exists at all then that usually means there's room for improvement. Make teams more effective so that SMs/POs/others don't need the support of a PM.
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