Project Management

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Topics: Consulting, Organizational Culture, Using PMI Standards
How to address a company with the wrong project management mindset?
I've been looking at the detail for the different project management approaches to be able to better address my clients' needs and to get comfortable integrating the different project management methodologies and techniques. The methodologies are a market for itself, that seems to be growing in variety but sadly shrinking on project management knowledge and mindset, IMO.

I've been noticing that methodologies and companies are closing themselves in a specific approach to project management, making the common one-size-fits-all mistake:
"Agile loses it sense if we put a waterfall on top of it."
"We want to implement agile methodologies" (despite the problem is lack of strategy)
"We decided to train our team for Lean Management, but they still don't know how to run a project and communicate effectively."

As a PMP, I can see the PMI standards behind every different methodology and how they can all be used as different ways to meet different needs. But I feel I'm losing some clients to this lack of understanding for what project management should really be, instead of a competition for specific methodologies and their specialists.

Do you have similar experience? How do you deal with this in your context? And what can be done to break this vicious cycle of trending competitive methodologies and their branded specialists?
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For me is simple: all you stated shows there is not a real understanding about a method and approach is. I will give a real example I was in charge to define and to use today In my actual work place we have 5 different ways to create products, two based on agile, three non-agile based. In the agile based we use Scrum and our own method. The same person is assigned as leader to more than one project using different approaches simultaneously. No problem with that. It works.
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1 reply by Tiago Nunes
Feb 25, 2020 3:19 PM
Tiago Nunes
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Thanks for your example, Sergio. I agree with you, there's no problem with that and that was exactly my point: we should be able to make project management work despite methods, methodologies or approaches.
Tiago -

PMI will be helping with this via the upcoming 7th edition of the PMBOK Guide, but till then, focus on principles for PM vs. specific methods, tools or practices. Organizations will have standards but those standards should have the flexibility to handle different contexts - if not, that is a good place to start with improvements.

Kiron
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1 reply by Tiago Nunes
Feb 25, 2020 3:21 PM
Tiago Nunes
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Thanks for the insight, Kiron. Always wise!
I'll be waiting to see how it'll be addressed in the next PMI edition.
Yes, you experience this through discussions as well. There is no middle ground and if you do not follow the rules for a specific methodology, framework, approach then you are doing it wrong. Personally I believe in doing what works. IF we spend as much time doing as we do putting everything is specific boxes we will get a lot done i.e. add value. It is however very difficult to convince people to do what works if it goes against the grain of their chosen approach and it is not always possible. But the beauty of incremental delivery is that you have the opportunity to demonstrate value early.
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2 replies by Stéphane Parent and Tiago Nunes
Feb 25, 2020 11:59 AM
Stéphane Parent
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You also get chances to improve during, rather than after, the project.
Feb 25, 2020 3:33 PM
Tiago Nunes
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Thanks for your perspective, Anton, I agree with you and as far I understood you've been also dealing with the same struggle. Cheers!
I agree with Kiron and Sergio
Feb 24, 2020 11:36 PM
Replying to Anton Oosthuizen
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Yes, you experience this through discussions as well. There is no middle ground and if you do not follow the rules for a specific methodology, framework, approach then you are doing it wrong. Personally I believe in doing what works. IF we spend as much time doing as we do putting everything is specific boxes we will get a lot done i.e. add value. It is however very difficult to convince people to do what works if it goes against the grain of their chosen approach and it is not always possible. But the beauty of incremental delivery is that you have the opportunity to demonstrate value early.
You also get chances to improve during, rather than after, the project.
Feb 24, 2020 3:12 PM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
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For me is simple: all you stated shows there is not a real understanding about a method and approach is. I will give a real example I was in charge to define and to use today In my actual work place we have 5 different ways to create products, two based on agile, three non-agile based. In the agile based we use Scrum and our own method. The same person is assigned as leader to more than one project using different approaches simultaneously. No problem with that. It works.
Thanks for your example, Sergio. I agree with you, there's no problem with that and that was exactly my point: we should be able to make project management work despite methods, methodologies or approaches.
Feb 24, 2020 4:28 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
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Tiago -

PMI will be helping with this via the upcoming 7th edition of the PMBOK Guide, but till then, focus on principles for PM vs. specific methods, tools or practices. Organizations will have standards but those standards should have the flexibility to handle different contexts - if not, that is a good place to start with improvements.

Kiron
Thanks for the insight, Kiron. Always wise!
I'll be waiting to see how it'll be addressed in the next PMI edition.
Feb 24, 2020 11:36 PM
Replying to Anton Oosthuizen
...
Yes, you experience this through discussions as well. There is no middle ground and if you do not follow the rules for a specific methodology, framework, approach then you are doing it wrong. Personally I believe in doing what works. IF we spend as much time doing as we do putting everything is specific boxes we will get a lot done i.e. add value. It is however very difficult to convince people to do what works if it goes against the grain of their chosen approach and it is not always possible. But the beauty of incremental delivery is that you have the opportunity to demonstrate value early.
Thanks for your perspective, Anton, I agree with you and as far I understood you've been also dealing with the same struggle. Cheers!

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