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Topics: Agile, Cost Management, Leadership
Leadership doesn't respect, and recognize PMP
Anonymous
Leadership doesn't respect, and recognize PMP in my organization. They consider it's just having a certificate that practically adds no value for them. They talk about Agile but consider only Scrum practices, and ceremony as Agile. How to cope up in such environment?
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While I don't doubt you know this already, remember the value is realized through actions and not the certification/designation itself. Demonstrate value return as a way to differentiate amongst others. Expecting the letters after your name to do the work for you is a sure-fire way to lose credibility when trying to establish it.

Having earned this, or other designations, should and does add value and credibility, though, again, it is actually established through the individual's actions and contributions, not solely by the certs.

Good luck. Keep the community apprised to how things progress.
I think getting a certificate is just the starting point.Once you have a certificate, how you act is important.
Knowledge always becomes obsolete, even Scrum thinking. In other words, I think it is important to always learn.
Project management gives you the framework to keep learning.
I was a senior manager at one of India's largest software houses, and my veteran boss did not know the difference between size and effort! Function point was a breaking-news to him! I understand and appreciate the coping difficulty you are facing.

I always remind people (and also myself) that it is the PMBOK that needs practicing every day. As Takeshi Miyaoka correctly pointed out, PMP is just the first milestone. Just list it as next to your name, make it a part of your signature without any hesitation because you have earned it through hard work.

I just focus on using the right term, producing the right artefact and whenever people appreciate my work-product, I just tell them that I learnt it from the PMBOK. Whenever I get an opportunity to explain something, I do mention the PMBOK and invite people to look at it.

You could try giving a few 20 minute lectures titled “10 cool thing PMBOK teachers you”, “5 ways in which PMBOK makes you efficient”, "How PMBOK saved me, twice!" etc. Don’t let them undervalue PMP. You try and educate them with short lectures. You can record them, release on YouTube and share the link either actively (email the link to your friends, family and colleagues) or passively (post it as WhatsApp status or LinkedIn post). We need to send a message that we are continuous learners and we pick up value on an incremental basis.

Best wishes ... keep calm and practice PMBOK (we should get a T-Shirt made with that slogan!)
...
1 reply by Mahadevan Sannasy
Mar 15, 2020 12:04 PM
Mahadevan Sannasy
...
Awesome - "Keep Calm and Practice PMBOK"
What improvements can you suggest to the existing practices? If you can advance your organisation's adoption of an agile approach then that will probably mean more to them than any certificate.
I have seen lousy employees with a PhD, MBA or both. Same things applies to PMP or any other certificate. The Project Manager that build the pyramids in Egypt sure did not have a PMP and managed to deliver the project quite successfully.

The knowledge from the PMBoK can be applied in many facets or project management. Stakeholder management, communication management, procurement management, even planning, are common elements in ways of working, ways of getting things done. So, use all of your knowledge to your advantage and show them that you are a successful (project) manager.
Accept the fact that leadership does not respect PMP.

Many, especially small organizations do not seek indirect solutions (they tend to be practical). They seek simple solutions vs theoretical concepts. Is it your responsibility to change that?

As the others said: be practical and deliver to their expectations and when asked you can refer to your education and PMP.

PMP is primarily providing you with knowledge and skills and a portfolio of tools. If you practice these, your competencies grow. It builds your self-confidence. maturity and resilience. One thing you learned was to understand stakeholders, their interests and needs and to establish trust by taking away uncertainty (make things simple).

Many fresh PMPs experience what you do. I saw not a few leaving their current organizations. Resilience means you learn from what you see and adapt your behavior to it.

Do not fight the system, use it.
Whenever we try to bring change it is essential that we have support of an influential, evangelist to help in making decision and implementing them. I had to struggle (sometimes I do even now) to make my evangelist understand the importance of PM (especially Agile) practices. Was able to implement SCRUMBAN successfully to an extremely critical and complex project. Complex because it had many moving parts – needed very close coordination among my Teams and Stakeholders distributed across the Geos – which was made possible only because of SCRUMBAN.

I had made up my mind to introduce Agile when this project was allocated to me. Considered all the factors – frequency of changing priorities, project duration, stakeholders’ distribution across the Geos – and zeroed down on combination of SCRUM and Kanban.

My suggestion to you would be –
• Identify the right approach for your projects – is Agile or Waterfall model the preferred way for execution.
• Identify the evangelist and take that person into your confidence. Make him\her understand the benefits gained for implementing PM practices.
• If Agile is the chosen approach, then identify if SCRUM is the preferred way. Some of my team members were apprehensive of daily SCRUM. Some had the concern of losing authority over the subject matter while others had this misconception that this might impact their appraisal. I had to spend good amount of time explaining the process and clearing their misunderstanding.
• Implementation of PM practices is always made easy with Tools. Select the right Tools and Technology.

Now that the PM practices are in place in my organization, they are about to become self-sustaining. My involvement is only limited to Project Initiation and Administration ( which involves onboarding the projects into Jira and Confluence).

All the best!
Feb 28, 2020 12:26 AM
Replying to Mahesha Pandit
...
I was a senior manager at one of India's largest software houses, and my veteran boss did not know the difference between size and effort! Function point was a breaking-news to him! I understand and appreciate the coping difficulty you are facing.

I always remind people (and also myself) that it is the PMBOK that needs practicing every day. As Takeshi Miyaoka correctly pointed out, PMP is just the first milestone. Just list it as next to your name, make it a part of your signature without any hesitation because you have earned it through hard work.

I just focus on using the right term, producing the right artefact and whenever people appreciate my work-product, I just tell them that I learnt it from the PMBOK. Whenever I get an opportunity to explain something, I do mention the PMBOK and invite people to look at it.

You could try giving a few 20 minute lectures titled “10 cool thing PMBOK teachers you”, “5 ways in which PMBOK makes you efficient”, "How PMBOK saved me, twice!" etc. Don’t let them undervalue PMP. You try and educate them with short lectures. You can record them, release on YouTube and share the link either actively (email the link to your friends, family and colleagues) or passively (post it as WhatsApp status or LinkedIn post). We need to send a message that we are continuous learners and we pick up value on an incremental basis.

Best wishes ... keep calm and practice PMBOK (we should get a T-Shirt made with that slogan!)
Awesome - "Keep Calm and Practice PMBOK"

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