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Topics: Agile, Lessons Learned, Scrum
For hybrid projects which approaches are you using?
I'm curious as to what approaches people are using for their hybrid projects out there. I recently had a project that used waterfall for the overall project but used parts of Agile for software build (Confluence and JIRA)

What other hybrid approaches have people seen?
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Susan -

There are infinite patterns for hybrid projects as it varies by domain and by what portions are adaptive and what portions are predictive.

Two common patterns are:

1. Specific sub-projects/workstreams are delivered in an agile manner whereas others are delivered in a waterfall manner with no/some/heavy integration between those.

2. Water-Scrum-Fall, Water-Scrum, Scrum-Fall - in all of these, the same set of requirements is partially delivered using agile approaches and partially delivered using traditional approaches.

On the continuum, very few projects outside of pure software development from the ground up are "full" agile.

Kiron
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1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Mar 05, 2020 7:08 PM
Rami Kaibni
...
Kiron

There is Niagara-Fall too, have you heard of it ? :D

RK
Susan

In our Real Estate Development / Construction projects, we use Waterfall-Agile Hybrid Approach.

Our Agile portion of the hybrid approach is close to the DSDM framework and mostly applied during the design phase. The waterfall kicks-in heavily after breaking grounds.

RK
Mar 05, 2020 5:15 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Susan -

There are infinite patterns for hybrid projects as it varies by domain and by what portions are adaptive and what portions are predictive.

Two common patterns are:

1. Specific sub-projects/workstreams are delivered in an agile manner whereas others are delivered in a waterfall manner with no/some/heavy integration between those.

2. Water-Scrum-Fall, Water-Scrum, Scrum-Fall - in all of these, the same set of requirements is partially delivered using agile approaches and partially delivered using traditional approaches.

On the continuum, very few projects outside of pure software development from the ground up are "full" agile.

Kiron
Kiron

There is Niagara-Fall too, have you heard of it ? :D

RK
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Mar 05, 2020 7:11 PM
Kiron Bondale
...
That is most definitely a predictive scenario - no one has successfully iterated back upstream once they have gone over those Falls!

Kiron
Mar 05, 2020 7:08 PM
Replying to Rami Kaibni
...
Kiron

There is Niagara-Fall too, have you heard of it ? :D

RK
That is most definitely a predictive scenario - no one has successfully iterated back upstream once they have gone over those Falls!

Kiron
...
1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Mar 05, 2020 7:21 PM
Rami Kaibni
...
Good comeback Kiron, I like it and it's true. Its a one way stream.
Mar 05, 2020 7:11 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
That is most definitely a predictive scenario - no one has successfully iterated back upstream once they have gone over those Falls!

Kiron
Good comeback Kiron, I like it and it's true. Its a one way stream.
...
1 reply by Peter Rapin
Mar 06, 2020 11:10 AM
Peter Rapin
...
I have used Niagara Falls in my risk management presentations. One can predict the probability of going over the Falls well upstream and develop mitigating measures. But as you continue on your journey the probability increases, the available mitigating measures decrease and require more effort. Ultimately you may go over the Falls however there remains a probability of survival. That probability increases subject to preparation. Even then some have been known to survive without protection. It's all a matter of risk tolerance.
The Falls can also be used to illustrate what can happen with a poorly managed project. One knows what's going to happen upstream but it becomes significantly more noticeable as you approach and go over the edge.
I live twenty minutes away from the Falls and visit frequently. It does make an impression.
I've deviated from the topic but couldn't resist. Please forgive!
Hi Susan - I have used in system implementation projects a hybrid model with more traditional efforts to start and finish (discovery and UAT) while using Scrum in execution.

For many projects that had worked really well. Typically in two scenarios; one with an organization or department completely knew to a different approach, and two, as a vendor, having a repeatable approach across multiple clients and having enough up front planning to support an SOW and budget.
Susan, I do not advocate or follow any specific pattern because I strongly believe that we need to adopt an approach that works. You can apply the basic premise of "high uncertainty = adaptive, low uncertainty = predictive" to put you into the right space but then you need to understand the needs of your stakeholders and apply that when deciding how adaptive or predictive you should/can be. If you are working on a piece where there is little uncertainty and you have a stakeholder(group) who are not in the Agile boat it makes no sense trying to convert them because we need to demonstrate our command over the latest buzz. We tend to forget or ignore the needs of our stakeholders when deciding on an approach.
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1 reply by Andrew Soswa
Mar 06, 2020 11:31 AM
Andrew Soswa
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Spot on Anton.
Some think that we can architecture the project's methodology into the company's structure.
This is my situation from years including it I am in charge to define the whole ecosystem and process in my actual workplace (and before). I just writting it due to put an example of the degree of accountability I am facing. The ecosystem (the architecture) is componsed by (from bottom to top) approach/life cycle method/life cycle process/method-framework/tool. So, you are talking about tool which is the last layer inside the "pyramid". All the layers are derivated from the previous layer bottom to top. All layers are highly cohesive and low coupling so we can interchanges components inside the layer with no-impact. Today we are using MS-Project, Azure DevOps no matter the life cycle we are using. Just to comment: Agile and waterfall are not matter of comparision. Agile is an approach and waterfall is a life cycle process.
Mar 05, 2020 7:21 PM
Replying to Rami Kaibni
...
Good comeback Kiron, I like it and it's true. Its a one way stream.
I have used Niagara Falls in my risk management presentations. One can predict the probability of going over the Falls well upstream and develop mitigating measures. But as you continue on your journey the probability increases, the available mitigating measures decrease and require more effort. Ultimately you may go over the Falls however there remains a probability of survival. That probability increases subject to preparation. Even then some have been known to survive without protection. It's all a matter of risk tolerance.
The Falls can also be used to illustrate what can happen with a poorly managed project. One knows what's going to happen upstream but it becomes significantly more noticeable as you approach and go over the edge.
I live twenty minutes away from the Falls and visit frequently. It does make an impression.
I've deviated from the topic but couldn't resist. Please forgive!
...
1 reply by Rami Kaibni
Mar 07, 2020 4:02 PM
Rami Kaibni
...
Peter

Great analogy, I like that, thank you.

RK
Mar 06, 2020 12:04 AM
Replying to Anton Oosthuizen
...
Susan, I do not advocate or follow any specific pattern because I strongly believe that we need to adopt an approach that works. You can apply the basic premise of "high uncertainty = adaptive, low uncertainty = predictive" to put you into the right space but then you need to understand the needs of your stakeholders and apply that when deciding how adaptive or predictive you should/can be. If you are working on a piece where there is little uncertainty and you have a stakeholder(group) who are not in the Agile boat it makes no sense trying to convert them because we need to demonstrate our command over the latest buzz. We tend to forget or ignore the needs of our stakeholders when deciding on an approach.
Spot on Anton.
Some think that we can architecture the project's methodology into the company's structure.
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