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Topics: Change Management, Healthcare, Risk Management
Is coronavirus in your risk registry?
I just entered coronavirus in my risk registry because it is a separate and unique risk to my projects. It impacts the availability/capacity of resources over and above things like BAU.
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Mar 29, 2020 10:42 AM
Replying to ABDELRAHMAN HUSSEIN ALI
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I do agree with Eduard’s statement referring to the PMBOK, moreover I think that such event/issue shall be addressed excessively, all Buisness owners n project managers must conduct their own analysis to come out with a course of actions that may help to reduce/mitigate the pandemic impact/consequence, and try to propose a legislation that can find a way to compensate the affected companies as well as project, that’s required to be specific to COVID19 . Let me tell you about my nightmare that I’m currently struggling with ; due to W.H.O classification of COVID-19 as a pandemic , my project owner has forced us (contractor) to suspend all project activities till further notification (at least 2 weeks lost already) meanwhile they’re saying that pandemic is considered as a force majeure, so that we’re only have a right to claim of EOT as per the contract terms, which isn’t fair at all, while the country authorized entities has circulated some precautions (Not instructing for full suspension) to be applied by all private sectors organizations those which we’ve fully complied Immediately, moreover our colleagues in other project didn’t suspend the work as we did, so in this case we need to have a specific publication/recommendation from an independent international organization can help us to resolve this big issue taking into consideration the countries’/states’ laws /regulations, avoiding disputes and potential judiciary interference
I mentioned this the other day, that many project customers will try and use the force majeure excuse to close the project out. But nearly all force majeure sections in contracts have to actually name the event (earthquake, flooding etc.) so I doubt anyone put a pandemic in there, but you never know.
A project should always consider anything that might cause a participating company to execute all or part of its Business Continuity plan, which covers highly unlikely but highly impactful events such as CATASTROPHE (flood, earthquake, severe storm, volcano, epidemic, famine, meteor strike, etc), STRIFE (war, terrorism, civil disturbance, alien invasion etc), ECONOMETRICS (power outage, labor issues/strikes, international incidents, market instability, currency exchange, etc), CRIME (thievery, arson, cyber attack, saboutage, etc), and OTHER business-specific risks.
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1 reply by Sante Vergini
Mar 30, 2020 5:41 PM
Sante Vergini
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Hi John, I didn't have most of these in my plan, but I did have COVID-19 a few months back.
Covid19 outbreak, pandemic all over the world, is no longer a risk. It's a reality, an issue impacting your plan.
Risks would be the organization suspending or even cancelling the project, team members unavailable due to disease, etc. In this context Covid19 might be the trigger.

I haven't include world pandemic in risk register back in January.

While Europe, Africa and America are still facing the first wave, China, Japan and others while returning to BAU, suffering the second wave.

One of the many uncertainties, unknown unknowns, is how the quarantine will end,
how people will get back to the offices,
would it be all at the same time?

Most of us haven't though about it and are dependent of governmental policies and board decisions not yet discussed.

On or off risk register, he keep reacting, about Catastrophes, strifes, econometrics, crimes and other sort of risks, such as meteorite hitting the planet, not much of idea about tomorrow.
No one would believe the consequences of Covid19 back in January, EUA (Trump), UK (Boris J.), Brasil (Bolsonaro) don't yet believe its true we are facing.

If you live each day as if it were your last, someday you'll be right. Steve Jobs
Hello Sante: I must be looking at this differently than my peers, because I have added COVID-19 impact as a risk for my projects. I work in the healthcare industry, and resources are being taken from my projects to help with the overload in hospitals. Projects that were going through implementations have been paused because we cannot take staff away from what they are doing to attend training prior to go live. I was working on a supply chain implementation, and the staging areas were needed for additional patient beds, etc. There have been many risks and impacts to the projects I am leading. These are risks that are being transferred, mitigated, avoided and accepted as appropriate.
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1 reply by Sante Vergini
Mar 30, 2020 5:46 PM
Sante Vergini
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Hi Lori, I would say it's a mixed bag: half included in their register (you and I included) and half didn't. Some see/saw it as a risk (you and I included) and some didn't. There may be an argument as to when one added COVID-19 determines whether or not it is/was a risk. I added mine in January. Your industry and projects more than any would be severely affected by the COVID-19 risk which is now no longer a risk but a reality. That doesn't mean to say there won't be many more risks added to your risk register as a result of the COVID-19 risk-turn-reality.
Mar 30, 2020 12:45 AM
Replying to John Herman
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A project should always consider anything that might cause a participating company to execute all or part of its Business Continuity plan, which covers highly unlikely but highly impactful events such as CATASTROPHE (flood, earthquake, severe storm, volcano, epidemic, famine, meteor strike, etc), STRIFE (war, terrorism, civil disturbance, alien invasion etc), ECONOMETRICS (power outage, labor issues/strikes, international incidents, market instability, currency exchange, etc), CRIME (thievery, arson, cyber attack, saboutage, etc), and OTHER business-specific risks.
Hi John, I didn't have most of these in my plan, but I did have COVID-19 a few months back.
Mar 30, 2020 11:22 AM
Replying to LORI WILSON
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Hello Sante: I must be looking at this differently than my peers, because I have added COVID-19 impact as a risk for my projects. I work in the healthcare industry, and resources are being taken from my projects to help with the overload in hospitals. Projects that were going through implementations have been paused because we cannot take staff away from what they are doing to attend training prior to go live. I was working on a supply chain implementation, and the staging areas were needed for additional patient beds, etc. There have been many risks and impacts to the projects I am leading. These are risks that are being transferred, mitigated, avoided and accepted as appropriate.
Hi Lori, I would say it's a mixed bag: half included in their register (you and I included) and half didn't. Some see/saw it as a risk (you and I included) and some didn't. There may be an argument as to when one added COVID-19 determines whether or not it is/was a risk. I added mine in January. Your industry and projects more than any would be severely affected by the COVID-19 risk which is now no longer a risk but a reality. That doesn't mean to say there won't be many more risks added to your risk register as a result of the COVID-19 risk-turn-reality.
COVID-19 is not a risk anymore - it is rather an issue now, that could potentially trigger other events. It is on my risk register as such - an issue to be dealt with.
We do not regularly put pandemic events on our risk registers, but US Government shutdown is a fixed feature :)
I agree with the group of commentators that see COVID-19 as an issue. It was a risk three months ago possibly included in the Known-Unknown class of risk. Now that it is an issue its impact may result in increased probability of other risk events as well as give rise to a whole new family of risk events. Depending on the nature of your industry and project it may be an opportunity.
Time to rework the risk register; adjust probabilities, add events and reconsider mitigation measures.
I would agree with the previous comments that COVID-19 is the trigger and not necessarily the risk. Influenza and inclement weather could both trigger a reaction or change to our daily functioning. The true risk is how prepared are we to react to the change...are we fully operational in a telework mode, can we maintain productivity when our resources may be limited due to self-isolation or quarantine. This is a challenging time where "business as usual" is being redefined on a daily basis.
Interesting view on this question by David Hillson

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/cyndi-snyde...6600132608-aGbj
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1 reply by Sante Vergini
Apr 27, 2020 3:21 PM
Sante Vergini
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Thanks, Thomas. As he said in the video, right now, the coronavirus is a reality, so it is not a risk. But as he also said, it was once an uncertainty. His definition of risk is "an uncertainty that matters". The coronavirus certainly was once an uncertainty that mattered. In other words, it was a risk once (uncertain), but now it isn't (certain). Further, he also states that issues that arise from the coronavirus bring about other risks. So in my view, it was a risk before it became certain, then wasn't a risk for a brief moment when it became certain, but then brought about many other risks the moment it did become certain. Therefore, the coronavirus was a risk, had a very brief reprieve, but has been wrapped in the cloak of risk ever since.
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