Project Management

Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Ethics, Organizational Culture, Resource Management
Will remote working stick?
Once the pandemic is over and many of us return back to the office, will we then make the case to managers that we should be working from home 1 or 2 days per week? It worked during the pandemic right? We were more productive, happier, less stressed, achieved a better work-life balance. Why not continue it?
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 <prev | next>
Mar 26, 2020 2:14 AM
Replying to Liu YuChuan
...
Special enterprises will perform remote work during the virus period, such as government enterprises, which need to collect whether other enterprises in China return to work or not; there are also some enterprises of life support products, which need to face-to-face, in addition to face-to-face phone contact, they do not have mailbox, video conference and other technical software to support them. Telecommuting in mainland China will last until May.
Agree that it is not possible for all positions to function remotely, my point is more that many companies are just not mature enough to adopt it as a general practise where the position allows for it. They would rather micromanage employees and waste vast amount of resources doing so.
Yes, for the most part.

What held us back before were feelings like the 'not invented here' syndrome, not having a compelling reason to change and maybe the easy way of procrastination in office. From an employers view lack of trust.

Now most people experience that it works, it even has benefits (no commuting time, closer contact to family, etc), so the hurdle will be lower. In Germany even doctors increasingly use tele-medicine, bringing top specialist to cases, not the other way around.

For sure f2f is still needed, but it can be focused on it's purpose of building trust.

Also, now we will develop new ways of remote work, we will observe VR / AR which will give us experiences not possible thru video/audio calls. Bandwidth does not seem to be a problem, Europe reduced Netflix bandwidth to ensure dialogue bandwidth, we already have a padding included (no pun intended, just teasing).

In IBM Germany, 15 years ago, we already had a ratio 1:12 for office space:employees. Saved a hell of office space and infrastructure and also promoted the paperless documentation. All colleagues enjoyed it, like I did. Be agile.
...
1 reply by Sante Vergini
Mar 26, 2020 7:00 PM
Sante Vergini
...
Thanks Thomas, a healthy mix of f2f and remote working is ideal.
Some (many) years ago we had individual offices so that we could concentrate on our assignments, have some privacy, etc. From there we went to open concept to encourage collaboration, integration, synergy, team building, etc. Now people are arguing for the effectiveness not only individual offices but but remote work stations. Technology accounts for some of that but I believe it to be a fad. It suits some jobs, some people some of the time but it will not become the industry standard.
...
1 reply by Sante Vergini
Mar 26, 2020 7:00 PM
Sante Vergini
...
Hi Peter, not for some time no.
Our generation is moving in this direction. The present scene created by pandemic has speedup this process too. The available interfaces still don't facilitate the level of interaction, as in-person F2F does. I believe we are very close to a point, where remote interface will become normal.
...
2 replies by Sante Vergini and Thomas Walenta
Mar 26, 2020 1:21 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Agree, Ashok.

I would even assume that a remote interaction could be more effective than a f2f since it can focus on the topic, if well prepared, and new tools (translation, text, chat, VR) may make it more efficient.

Time will tell, soon.
Mar 26, 2020 7:01 PM
Sante Vergini
...
Hello Ashok, I agree with that.
Dear Sante,

After the COVID-19 outbreak I would say that a lot of people will be running back to the office and wont bring up remote working any time soon.

Peoples daily routine and way of life has been disrupted and for a temporary period they maybe happier because of the novelty factor and not having to endure the daily commute.

But after a few more weeks of this new routine you will start to get a sense of peoples boredom and missing the general banter, atmosphere and goings on with working amongsts people in an office environment.

The drinks after work, staying late, work lunches and other aspects of the social environment of work will be the first thing back on the agenda for most people.

Long live the evolution :-)

Daire
...
2 replies by Daire Guiney and Sante Vergini
Mar 26, 2020 7:02 PM
Sante Vergini
...
Hi Daire, sure, most people need that social interaction. Having the choice between both worlds would be the best I think.
Mar 27, 2020 5:37 AM
Daire Guiney
...
Dear Sante,

I agree. Like most things you will probably see a hybrid approach with people splitting their time between working remotely from home and from an organizations office be it a local/regional office or a head office.

This approach could actually lead people to working more hours and longer days than one or the other approach.

Ultimately people will find the environment were they are the most productive and use that for work purposes.

I do not think organization will ever have a 100% remote worker policy as a head office and having a physical presence is it important for an organization to maintain its image and strengthen its brand.

A lot of organizations use their offices as a show of strength, continuity and purpose. No different to days of building large castles and palaces to display power and wealth.

Daire
There is too much fear based management here in the US. Remote work challenges the power structure in the office. If the manager can't see you working, then you aren't working at all. I doubt it will remain as a policy.

But, if a company continues to say they are looking to increase their sustainable business practices they need to seriously consider work from home policies.
...
2 replies by Sante Vergini and Thomas Walenta
Mar 26, 2020 2:42 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Ed, interesting.

Facts are countering that impression of bosses that they are in control. According to US Bureau of Labor Statistics 2018, the average US worker clocks 8,8 hours but works effectively 3 hours.
Other countries may be slightly better, but it is a general problem for work in office, which I have also seen in Japan (where government had to issue an explicit order to work remotely).

Also, the way how work is assigned plays a role. If it is task-driven it indeed requires frequent control, if it is purpose and results driven, you can delegate more freely and let them run. This concept is called in military 'mission type tactic' (Auftragstaktik) and was introduced to warfare in 1866 by General von Moltke, with great results.

My hypothesis is that remote work is more effective, driven by meeting schedules and result handovers as well as the need for management to abandon their authority based leadership style for some more trustful means.

Isn't this part of scaling agile too?
Mar 26, 2020 7:03 PM
Sante Vergini
...
Hi Ed, I agree. Trust was the number one issue (and loss of control) that I experienced in a previous workforce migration to working from home.
One of the issues of working from home is the increased difficulty of separating work and personal life. Some have the ability to switch from one to the other - 8 hours work, 16 hours personal. But for many of us its a mishmash of 24 hours. The office is always there, the personal life is always there. Its disturbing not only to the working person but also everyone else in the household including the dog. I tried it, didn't like it, ended up renting desk space down the street in a commercial complex.
...
1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Mar 26, 2020 1:28 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Ralph, agree.

I doubt the old western paradigm of work-life balance enabled by 9-5 will apply in the future. Volkswagen disabled office emails after working hours, but there is still whatsapp etc.

If you are passionate and in a state of flow, time is no limit.
If your team mates are friends, replies are immediate.
If your brain circuits come up with a solution Saturday night, you write it down.

Discipline and structure helps, agility and passion breaks it.
Mar 26, 2020 11:34 AM
Replying to Ashok Kumar
...
Our generation is moving in this direction. The present scene created by pandemic has speedup this process too. The available interfaces still don't facilitate the level of interaction, as in-person F2F does. I believe we are very close to a point, where remote interface will become normal.
Agree, Ashok.

I would even assume that a remote interaction could be more effective than a f2f since it can focus on the topic, if well prepared, and new tools (translation, text, chat, VR) may make it more efficient.

Time will tell, soon.
Mar 26, 2020 12:24 PM
Replying to Peter Rapin
...
One of the issues of working from home is the increased difficulty of separating work and personal life. Some have the ability to switch from one to the other - 8 hours work, 16 hours personal. But for many of us its a mishmash of 24 hours. The office is always there, the personal life is always there. Its disturbing not only to the working person but also everyone else in the household including the dog. I tried it, didn't like it, ended up renting desk space down the street in a commercial complex.
Ralph, agree.

I doubt the old western paradigm of work-life balance enabled by 9-5 will apply in the future. Volkswagen disabled office emails after working hours, but there is still whatsapp etc.

If you are passionate and in a state of flow, time is no limit.
If your team mates are friends, replies are immediate.
If your brain circuits come up with a solution Saturday night, you write it down.

Discipline and structure helps, agility and passion breaks it.
Mar 26, 2020 12:14 PM
Replying to Ed Tsyitee Jr
...
There is too much fear based management here in the US. Remote work challenges the power structure in the office. If the manager can't see you working, then you aren't working at all. I doubt it will remain as a policy.

But, if a company continues to say they are looking to increase their sustainable business practices they need to seriously consider work from home policies.
Ed, interesting.

Facts are countering that impression of bosses that they are in control. According to US Bureau of Labor Statistics 2018, the average US worker clocks 8,8 hours but works effectively 3 hours.
Other countries may be slightly better, but it is a general problem for work in office, which I have also seen in Japan (where government had to issue an explicit order to work remotely).

Also, the way how work is assigned plays a role. If it is task-driven it indeed requires frequent control, if it is purpose and results driven, you can delegate more freely and let them run. This concept is called in military 'mission type tactic' (Auftragstaktik) and was introduced to warfare in 1866 by General von Moltke, with great results.

My hypothesis is that remote work is more effective, driven by meeting schedules and result handovers as well as the need for management to abandon their authority based leadership style for some more trustful means.

Isn't this part of scaling agile too?
Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 <prev | next>  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Sacred cows make the best hamburger."

- Mark Twain

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors