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What are your key learning in managing project with Work from home mode?
Most of us are working on projects from home. There are many challenges we might already have came across and many which we might have thought as risk, may not be a risk now.
Please do share your experience, observation about work from home
- threats
- Opportunities
- Lessons learnt
- New best practices
And more....
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Resist knee jerk reaction, a typical one the tendency or urge to start micromanaging. You MUST trust your team. Initially, you will have to engage more frequently but be careful that it does not come across as mistrust. Return to 'normal' as soon as you are satisfied that all your collaboration channels are functioning the way you want them to function. 'Normal' means not killing the team with constant meetings, check-ins, etc.
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1 reply by Tarun Nair
May 25, 2020 2:30 AM
Tarun Nair
...
Thank you Anton for your response.
I see similarity in views from you and others.
I agree that we should trust the team and ensure that we are not doing micromangement.
Thomas' comment about talking non-work is very important. We did it in the office, it shouldn't stop with WFH, and is part of being human and maintaining our well-being.

For me also, exercise was part of my daily office routine, walking to public transport or riding bicycle to work, plus up to another hour per day walking between meetings. Speaking to the teams I work with, this is not unusual. So as Jao noted, many of us need to consciously schedule exercise time. And this *can* be in middle of the day eg to take advantage of nice weather for those of us who have less pleasant winters, or to provide a mental break.
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1 reply by Tarun Nair
May 25, 2020 8:34 AM
Tarun Nair
...
Yes i do agree with your point. I am also ensuring that I am not stick to one place for long time. I am talking to one or other team member alternatively to be in connect and know how things are moving with WFH.
May 25, 2020 2:01 AM
Replying to Anton Oosthuizen
...
Resist knee jerk reaction, a typical one the tendency or urge to start micromanaging. You MUST trust your team. Initially, you will have to engage more frequently but be careful that it does not come across as mistrust. Return to 'normal' as soon as you are satisfied that all your collaboration channels are functioning the way you want them to function. 'Normal' means not killing the team with constant meetings, check-ins, etc.
Thank you Anton for your response.
I see similarity in views from you and others.
I agree that we should trust the team and ensure that we are not doing micromangement.
May 25, 2020 2:26 AM
Replying to Ashleigh Kennett-Smith
...
Thomas' comment about talking non-work is very important. We did it in the office, it shouldn't stop with WFH, and is part of being human and maintaining our well-being.

For me also, exercise was part of my daily office routine, walking to public transport or riding bicycle to work, plus up to another hour per day walking between meetings. Speaking to the teams I work with, this is not unusual. So as Jao noted, many of us need to consciously schedule exercise time. And this *can* be in middle of the day eg to take advantage of nice weather for those of us who have less pleasant winters, or to provide a mental break.
Yes i do agree with your point. I am also ensuring that I am not stick to one place for long time. I am talking to one or other team member alternatively to be in connect and know how things are moving with WFH.
I agree that checking in with your colleagues about how they're feeling is important during this time. Celebrate/acknowledge their birthdays, work anniversaries, graduations of their kids, etc.
One way I've maintained my work schedule and not worked overtime is by setting a ritual to begin and end my work day. Currently, I "commute" to and from "work" (in my home office) by walking a mile around my neighborhood. This allow me to get some fresh air and exercise, and I can reset my mind during my walk.
Another technique I've been using is the Pomodoro method. I don't have trouble focusing on work, but in the office, I occasionally got up to get water, speak with a colleague, or grab something from the printer. Without those natural breaks, I found myself quickly getting exhausted. Now, I set my timer for 50 minutes and take a 10-minute break to do something, anything, not work-related. At the end of 4 hours, I take a 20-minute break (usually for lunch). I've found that this has made me much more productive than working straight through the breaks.
I appreciate all of the comments here. It's interesting to see how everyone has adapted so quickly to this new situation.
May 21, 2020 11:50 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Tarun -

Think of working from home as a risk response strategy to reduce the risk of catching COVID-19 and/or spreading it to your co-workers.

However, with the implementation of risk response strategies there is the potential for secondary risks to be generated.

Here are a few of the risks which could be introduced:
- Changes to expected productivity and output - either increased or decreased depending on a number of factors
- Changes to team dynamics and morale - either positive or negative
- Changes to product/service quality - either positive or negative

Kiron
I would add an import part of the risk foot print is assessment of criticality of office presence and measures put in place for safe environment. No project will justify being unsafe in the workplace.
May 21, 2020 5:58 PM
Replying to Tarun Nair
...
Thank you Kiron for your response.
My question is not on identification of possible risks, rather I am looking for the real life LL and the possible best practices which people have adopted during this WFH duration. The idea is to discuss new learnings which might help others and we can learn new best practices or define new ones based on feedback.
What do you mean by Real Life LL?
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2 replies by Itay Laxer and Tarun Nair
Jun 07, 2020 10:50 AM
Tarun Nair
...
Real life LL means the LL from your experience.
Jun 07, 2020 5:37 PM
Itay Laxer
...
What is LL?
Tarun,

For me, our office was not set up with work from home capabilities, so the transition was a bit difficult getting our team working at full capacity again, from an IT standpoint. Now that we've settled in, our team is up and running at full force.

One initial risk I noted was the potential for more errors in work, as we were working outside of our usual processes from a hardware standpoint, as we were no longer working on our our multiple screens, but instead are working on tablets. To my surprise, our team has actually reduced our number of errors significantly since working remotely. This was a great surprise and I'm happy to see that we are able to adopt and not have our work suffer.

As for communication, for the most part, it has been easy to communicate with my team. However, the exceptions to this are our upper management team, as it often takes multiple follow-ups to get a single response. Identifying this now as a risk for potential delays, my team has put in more internal steps and video calls to ensure we receive the support needed for each project in a timely manner.

Overall, I'm pleasantly surprised with the productivity level of our team and how we transitioned into the work-from-home structure.
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1 reply by Tarun Nair
Jun 07, 2020 10:58 AM
Tarun Nair
...
Thanks for sharing your experience. A really good one to look for further learnings. May be you can have a short workshop to collect points which helped in improving productivity of your team.
Jun 05, 2020 11:23 PM
Replying to Itay Laxer
...
What do you mean by Real Life LL?
Real life LL means the LL from your experience.
Jun 07, 2020 10:30 AM
Replying to McKenzie Whitlow
...
Tarun,

For me, our office was not set up with work from home capabilities, so the transition was a bit difficult getting our team working at full capacity again, from an IT standpoint. Now that we've settled in, our team is up and running at full force.

One initial risk I noted was the potential for more errors in work, as we were working outside of our usual processes from a hardware standpoint, as we were no longer working on our our multiple screens, but instead are working on tablets. To my surprise, our team has actually reduced our number of errors significantly since working remotely. This was a great surprise and I'm happy to see that we are able to adopt and not have our work suffer.

As for communication, for the most part, it has been easy to communicate with my team. However, the exceptions to this are our upper management team, as it often takes multiple follow-ups to get a single response. Identifying this now as a risk for potential delays, my team has put in more internal steps and video calls to ensure we receive the support needed for each project in a timely manner.

Overall, I'm pleasantly surprised with the productivity level of our team and how we transitioned into the work-from-home structure.
Thanks for sharing your experience. A really good one to look for further learnings. May be you can have a short workshop to collect points which helped in improving productivity of your team.
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