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Topics: Agile
How to adopt Agile in Manufacturing Industry
How to adopt Agile practices in manufacturing industry based projects
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Hi Shyam. If you read experts who have used both methods (agile and predictive) will tell you Agile is not for all cases. Those who have primarily use agile will tell you differently because that is all they know. You probably want a hybrid approach. e.g.: You don't want a large stainless steel pipeline installation to be changed during installation. This part is better to be predictive.
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2 replies by Sandeep Biswas and shyam sundar
Jul 30, 2020 12:03 PM
Sandeep Biswas
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Hello Jorge,
I agree with your comments that the approach needs to be tailored to the project needs.
Jul 31, 2020 9:09 AM
shyam sundar
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Noted Thanks
Jul 30, 2020 11:15 AM
Replying to Jorge Escoto
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Hi Shyam. If you read experts who have used both methods (agile and predictive) will tell you Agile is not for all cases. Those who have primarily use agile will tell you differently because that is all they know. You probably want a hybrid approach. e.g.: You don't want a large stainless steel pipeline installation to be changed during installation. This part is better to be predictive.
Hello Jorge,
I agree with your comments that the approach needs to be tailored to the project needs.
Shyam -

Let's different an agile mindset from an agile life cycle from specific agile practices. The first and third can be applied anywhere. The second is context-specific depending on its applicability to a given project.

If the project is to conceive and develop a new product which will then be mass produced in an assembly line, agile life cycles can certainly apply to ensure the "right" product is built. However, once you have this verification, the actual manufacturing of a commercially salable product might follow a more traditional approach.

Kiron
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1 reply by shyam sundar
Jul 31, 2020 9:12 AM
shyam sundar
...
Ok Thanks
It will certainly depend on factors such as the maturity of the manufacturing system, but I think that agile approaches are an excellent fit in a mfg. environment and have virtually unlimited possibilities.

For projects creating something new, approaches like rapid prototyping using additive manufacturing (3D printing) or starting with crude tooling before full production tooling can allow you to create and validate minimum viable products which can then be leveraged for future development.

In improvement activities whether they be error reduction, rate increases, etc. there are always opportunities that may be identified and you can focus on individual opportunities in a sprint-like approach rather than building a full end-to-end schedule in a more predictive approach.

Some projects do require a more hybrid approach, especially when you consider production tooling development can require very long flow times. When I've done product development where we focused both on new products and new manufacturing methods, we were constantly employing agile techniques (although we didn't call it that back then) and I've earned a few patents as a direct result of our developmental efforts.
...
1 reply by shyam sundar
Jul 31, 2020 9:13 AM
shyam sundar
...
Thank you
Agile was born in manufacturing domain. In fact, the first time the word Agile was used in the context was a seminal paper called "Agile Manufacturing" in the earliest 80 and it was the reason because the Agile USA DoD/NSF Forum was created at Leihigh Unversity in 1990 wich was the place were "Agile" and "agility" terms were created along with the definition about how to get it. The Forum was created because after making a prospective about how the world will be in 2010-2015 the result showed that Lean would not enough to deal with that world then Agile was created. The Forum is still active and it is sponsored by Lee Iacocca Foundation just unfortunately is only open for members. So, my personal experience, started on that field and still remains. In fact, the initiative I led was included in Hardvard business review because the success in South America regarding using Agile in manufacturing and all the commercialization chain. Too much chat, sorry, but the last comment is: you need to understand is not what you usually hear from software field or you hear from the PMI. That is Agile implementation to software only. Agile is beyond that.
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1 reply by shyam sundar
Jul 31, 2020 9:11 AM
shyam sundar
...
Good to hear that. Would be great to know in detail on its adaptability. I am trying to create a framework to manage programs in agile way for our manufacturing industry .
Jul 30, 2020 11:15 AM
Replying to Jorge Escoto
...
Hi Shyam. If you read experts who have used both methods (agile and predictive) will tell you Agile is not for all cases. Those who have primarily use agile will tell you differently because that is all they know. You probably want a hybrid approach. e.g.: You don't want a large stainless steel pipeline installation to be changed during installation. This part is better to be predictive.
Noted Thanks
Jul 31, 2020 8:34 AM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
...
Agile was born in manufacturing domain. In fact, the first time the word Agile was used in the context was a seminal paper called "Agile Manufacturing" in the earliest 80 and it was the reason because the Agile USA DoD/NSF Forum was created at Leihigh Unversity in 1990 wich was the place were "Agile" and "agility" terms were created along with the definition about how to get it. The Forum was created because after making a prospective about how the world will be in 2010-2015 the result showed that Lean would not enough to deal with that world then Agile was created. The Forum is still active and it is sponsored by Lee Iacocca Foundation just unfortunately is only open for members. So, my personal experience, started on that field and still remains. In fact, the initiative I led was included in Hardvard business review because the success in South America regarding using Agile in manufacturing and all the commercialization chain. Too much chat, sorry, but the last comment is: you need to understand is not what you usually hear from software field or you hear from the PMI. That is Agile implementation to software only. Agile is beyond that.
Good to hear that. Would be great to know in detail on its adaptability. I am trying to create a framework to manage programs in agile way for our manufacturing industry .
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Jul 31, 2020 2:19 PM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
Agile is the same than Lean about the fact that is totally independent of the life cycle you use. Agile is about enterprise architecture. You can find it inside the Rick Dove´s book "Response Ability" which is the compendium Rick made about the deliverables of the forum I named above. On the other side, you can search into the internet the Agile Manufacturing paper.
Jul 30, 2020 3:04 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
Shyam -

Let's different an agile mindset from an agile life cycle from specific agile practices. The first and third can be applied anywhere. The second is context-specific depending on its applicability to a given project.

If the project is to conceive and develop a new product which will then be mass produced in an assembly line, agile life cycles can certainly apply to ensure the "right" product is built. However, once you have this verification, the actual manufacturing of a commercially salable product might follow a more traditional approach.

Kiron
Ok Thanks
Jul 30, 2020 3:11 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
It will certainly depend on factors such as the maturity of the manufacturing system, but I think that agile approaches are an excellent fit in a mfg. environment and have virtually unlimited possibilities.

For projects creating something new, approaches like rapid prototyping using additive manufacturing (3D printing) or starting with crude tooling before full production tooling can allow you to create and validate minimum viable products which can then be leveraged for future development.

In improvement activities whether they be error reduction, rate increases, etc. there are always opportunities that may be identified and you can focus on individual opportunities in a sprint-like approach rather than building a full end-to-end schedule in a more predictive approach.

Some projects do require a more hybrid approach, especially when you consider production tooling development can require very long flow times. When I've done product development where we focused both on new products and new manufacturing methods, we were constantly employing agile techniques (although we didn't call it that back then) and I've earned a few patents as a direct result of our developmental efforts.
Thank you
Jul 31, 2020 9:11 AM
Replying to shyam sundar
...
Good to hear that. Would be great to know in detail on its adaptability. I am trying to create a framework to manage programs in agile way for our manufacturing industry .
Agile is the same than Lean about the fact that is totally independent of the life cycle you use. Agile is about enterprise architecture. You can find it inside the Rick Dove´s book "Response Ability" which is the compendium Rick made about the deliverables of the forum I named above. On the other side, you can search into the internet the Agile Manufacturing paper.

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