Project Management

Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Agile, Organizational Project Management
Can you please help me with the KPIs that are being used for waterfall and Agile project management
KPIs for waterfall and agile project management
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 next>
KPIs are specific to an organization, division or department and should be:

1. Aligned with the goals the leadership team wants to achieve
2. Holistic and balanced to avoid unintended consequences

Kiron
KPI's are determined according to the nature of your enterprise. Power BI is an excellent Tool to convert database information in Reports for visualizing global C-Level KPI information. In agile, there is a valuable tool to communicate Trello Agile Dashboards with Power BI, allowing the user to obtain global KPI indicators of the agile tasks in a single Dashboard. Check this tool in https://www.facebook.com/Teleworking-Monitoring-107369664431280/. It's been used to monitor telework agile tasks.
KPIs can align with leadership goals by using good reporting tools, as mentioned by Veronica.
I love it. I've been looking into KPI's for over 10 years with little success, and every time a question like this comes up, there are rarely any specific metrics given. Why is that? Let's see the KPI's that YOU are using within your organization. Don't be shy. This site/ forum is specifically aimed at helping others with questions like this.
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Sep 02, 2020 8:21 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
My take is that valuable metrics should be defined for projects in general and not segregated by life cycle or approach. Yes, you can use certain specific metrics (e.g. cycle time) for looking at how the product of the project gets produced, but true KPIs need to be universal within the portfolio.

To ensure that there is a balance, KPIs should cover the following at a minimum:
- business value delivered
- quality of the product/service/result
- team & stakeholder satisfaction

Kiron
Sep 02, 2020 7:34 AM
Replying to Steve Ratkaj
...
I love it. I've been looking into KPI's for over 10 years with little success, and every time a question like this comes up, there are rarely any specific metrics given. Why is that? Let's see the KPI's that YOU are using within your organization. Don't be shy. This site/ forum is specifically aimed at helping others with questions like this.
My take is that valuable metrics should be defined for projects in general and not segregated by life cycle or approach. Yes, you can use certain specific metrics (e.g. cycle time) for looking at how the product of the project gets produced, but true KPIs need to be universal within the portfolio.

To ensure that there is a balance, KPIs should cover the following at a minimum:
- business value delivered
- quality of the product/service/result
- team & stakeholder satisfaction

Kiron
Thanks Steve for making this a focussed one and yes a more organisational specific reply would help from all rather that a general one.

Just to understand better Kiran , can you help out some project managment KPI examples which would cover the below ones you mentioned :

-business value delivered
- quality of the product/service/result
- team & stakeholder satisfaction
The point is what you need to meassure. Agile is an approch. Waterfall is a life cycle. In fact, Agile can be used with waterfall life cycle. So, what are you going to meassure? The approach? The process? With that on hand you can define the KPIs
Thanks for the input Sergio , yes my query was more on the lines of KPIs for project management process itself .
I did stumble upon this wiki link and it does seems to provide a good insight .

https://www.projectmanagement.com/wikis/511087/PMO-KPI

Hope this helps others too.
...
1 reply by Keith Novak
Sep 02, 2020 12:55 PM
Keith Novak
...
I'd like to elaborate on what Sergio and others have said just a bit as this subject relates directly to my engineering specialty and has been a focus of my career many times:

A project is essentially a system of people, processes, and tools who's purpose is to generate some kind of defined output. For any system or in this case project team, in order to optimize the system, you must define what qualities or attributes you are trying to optimize. Those critical attributes are what I think Sergio meant by "what you need to measure". The KPIs are whatever measurable quantity you have decided represents the chosen project attributes.

In PM, cost and schedule are about universally used as metrics of the project performance so those are two obvious KPIs. Depending on the nature of the project, you must choose what other attributes are important. Projects may be focused on many other attributes such as the product performance improvement, or cost reduction, error rate, takt time, resource utilization, or whatever are the strategic objectives of the project.

The framework that I use as my mental model from a systems engineering background is:
1) Define what qualities differentiate a good system (project) from a bad one. (what to measure)
2) Determine what you can effectively measure to evaluate those qualities. (how to measure)

Name the 5 most important qualities of what differentiates a well run project from a poorly run project. Figure out what you can measure to tell you about those qualities. Those are your KPIs.
Sep 02, 2020 10:04 AM
Replying to Vijay Gopinathan Pillai
...
Thanks for the input Sergio , yes my query was more on the lines of KPIs for project management process itself .
I did stumble upon this wiki link and it does seems to provide a good insight .

https://www.projectmanagement.com/wikis/511087/PMO-KPI

Hope this helps others too.
I'd like to elaborate on what Sergio and others have said just a bit as this subject relates directly to my engineering specialty and has been a focus of my career many times:

A project is essentially a system of people, processes, and tools who's purpose is to generate some kind of defined output. For any system or in this case project team, in order to optimize the system, you must define what qualities or attributes you are trying to optimize. Those critical attributes are what I think Sergio meant by "what you need to measure". The KPIs are whatever measurable quantity you have decided represents the chosen project attributes.

In PM, cost and schedule are about universally used as metrics of the project performance so those are two obvious KPIs. Depending on the nature of the project, you must choose what other attributes are important. Projects may be focused on many other attributes such as the product performance improvement, or cost reduction, error rate, takt time, resource utilization, or whatever are the strategic objectives of the project.

The framework that I use as my mental model from a systems engineering background is:
1) Define what qualities differentiate a good system (project) from a bad one. (what to measure)
2) Determine what you can effectively measure to evaluate those qualities. (how to measure)

Name the 5 most important qualities of what differentiates a well run project from a poorly run project. Figure out what you can measure to tell you about those qualities. Those are your KPIs.
All good responses, and not to hijack the OP's thread, but lets' see some real world examples that are actually being used within your organization within your corporate reporting frameworks and performance reporting dashboards. I'm really beginning to doubt if KPIs really exist and are just really a figment of the collective PM communities imagination because it sounds and looks good in textbooks.
Page: 1 2 next>  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"A mind once stretched by a new idea never regains its original dimensions."

- Anonymous