Project Management

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Topics: Quality, Scheduling, Using PMI Standards
Sequence of activities: Planning, Executing, M&C
Dear all,

Currently I am studying for the PMP exam and I have been finding it difficult to understand two concepts found in the bibliography and in the PMBOK, regarding the activities in each of the groups of processes:

1. It seems the right moment to determine the Planning Team is right after assessing what to purchase and creating the procurement documents.
Now, from my point of view the Planning Team should also be involved in determining whether buying, making or renting is the right approach for a certain activity. Even more important would be to consider that such decision would only be made after Determining the Critical Path since the total length of the project might be a strong deterrent of taking one or other approach.
I think that only then would such decision be made regarding what to purchase. If not made, at least concluded.

2. The bibliography also mentions that the process of Determining Whether Quality Plan and Processes are Correct and Effective is part of the Executing group of processes.
From my point of view this process should be part of the Monitoring and Controlling group of processes since only after the executing processes are followed-through will we have data to process into information, in order to be able to evaluate the adequacy of the processes vs. the Quality Plan.

Since these concepts are exposed in the bilbiography and (seemingly) widely accepted, where am I am incorrectly understanding these processes, and why should they belong to one or the other group?

Thank you for your feedback in advance,

Bruno
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Bruno,
Let me start out by saying that I thought the most worthless part of studying for the exam was trying to make sense in my mind what fit into a specific process group. The good news is you will never have to think about it again unless you are helping edit the PMBOK, or answering questions like this.

You can organize things lots of different ways.

The second thing is that the process groups are not time phased. They're very much iterative. The planning team changes as you know more about the solution approach. Initially you don't know what you will procure until your design starts to mature. Once you gain more knowledge, you must do more planning.

Likewise, quality planning may fit into different groups based on how you are managing quality. Are you designing quality in so that errors are avoided (QA), or are you inspecting errors out so they aren't passed to the customer (QC)?

If you have the concept knowledge down (and asking questions like why the heck does this fit here is great for exploring your knowledge) you'll only struggle with why it was placed in one group until you pass the exam. After that it's semantics that the purists can argue. ;-)
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1 reply by Donna Heagan
Sep 03, 2020 2:31 AM
Donna Heagan
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Yes I agree with Keith.
At this point in my studies for the exam it is important to do situational questions since the exam is about 80-90% situational questions.
What is the bibliography? I've read the PMBOK 2 times and did a college course and an online course. Enough!!! time to just do practice questions.
I heard it's a wise practice to do 5000-6000 questions before exam.
Bruno,

As you mentioned you are preparing for PMP exam, refer RITA's PROCESS CHART.

This chart will clarify to great extent respect to the queries you asked for.
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1 reply by Donna Heagan
Sep 03, 2020 2:37 AM
Donna Heagan
...
Yes! Rita's Process Chart!!! I have it. :)
Bruno,

in my point of view studding the PMBOK and preparing for the exam is important only to get the basic knowledge, which will be the core of your experience, then in the real life you will manage the project, process, and the steps the way that serve your project nature and reaching the required outcome. In the beginning of all PMBOK chapters there is a page about customizing\tailoring the process and its sequence upon your organization and project nature.

I don’t advise to think about it as a block that you cant tailor it as you see fit and as the project require.

At the end the practice is the best way to earn more experience and enhance your knowledge.

good luck
Sep 02, 2020 1:21 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
Bruno,
Let me start out by saying that I thought the most worthless part of studying for the exam was trying to make sense in my mind what fit into a specific process group. The good news is you will never have to think about it again unless you are helping edit the PMBOK, or answering questions like this.

You can organize things lots of different ways.

The second thing is that the process groups are not time phased. They're very much iterative. The planning team changes as you know more about the solution approach. Initially you don't know what you will procure until your design starts to mature. Once you gain more knowledge, you must do more planning.

Likewise, quality planning may fit into different groups based on how you are managing quality. Are you designing quality in so that errors are avoided (QA), or are you inspecting errors out so they aren't passed to the customer (QC)?

If you have the concept knowledge down (and asking questions like why the heck does this fit here is great for exploring your knowledge) you'll only struggle with why it was placed in one group until you pass the exam. After that it's semantics that the purists can argue. ;-)
Yes I agree with Keith.
At this point in my studies for the exam it is important to do situational questions since the exam is about 80-90% situational questions.
What is the bibliography? I've read the PMBOK 2 times and did a college course and an online course. Enough!!! time to just do practice questions.
I heard it's a wise practice to do 5000-6000 questions before exam.
Sep 03, 2020 12:10 AM
Replying to Ganesh Manivannan
...
Bruno,

As you mentioned you are preparing for PMP exam, refer RITA's PROCESS CHART.

This chart will clarify to great extent respect to the queries you asked for.
Yes! Rita's Process Chart!!! I have it. :)
Keith,
Thank you for the heads-up.
As a matter of fact and now that I put the study in perspective maybe I was approaching it in a too theoretical manner.
On the other hand, and just like Samah Abdelhadi said, considering the PMBOK as tool subject to Tailoring on a common basis, and also reminding myself the study part is intended to get the certification first and foremost, then it makes sense just to understand the concept and morph it into practical experience when the designated process will be applied in real life.

Donna I was following Rita's Process Chart indeed.
The reason why I did not identify it before was because I did not know if it was accepted to disclose study books (other than the PMBOK) in this forum.
In fact, Rita's Chart is the basis for my question here :)
I also read over the internet that doing practice exams is the right approach to passing the exam and it makes absolute sense to me.
But I was refraining from doing so since, if memory doesnt fail me, Rita´s PMP Exam Prep recommends to not doing more than 2 full exams. So I have been divided in my study plan.

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