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Topics: Business Analysis, Information Technology, Organizational Culture
How to measure IT PM time
Hello,

The new CEO of our company has requested monthly reports to all department managers to see how the employees are investing their time.

I am project manager in the IT department, part of the IT Implementation Team. My boss is having a hard time for showing our time using the tools that we have today.

We have a ticketing system where the general support team and the network team register their time by closing tickets. But for implementation team, we do not have that option because we do not work tickets, we manage projects only. We could create tickets for everything that we work on but my boss thinks is going to be much work added and not worth of it.

Does anyone know a good tool or procedure for recording work time spent by project managers?

Thanks
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Just to put this in a context where you have the possibility to investigate more we implemented TBM in the company where I am working on. Perhaps is too much for your requirement but I am writing the reference trying to add more information. You can find information by searching "tbm council org"
...
1 reply by Henry Seron
Sep 25, 2020 9:32 AM
Henry Seron
...
Hi Sergio,

Thanks for the tip, I am reading about it and seems very interesting. Looks like something that we could use in my company :)
I would be very happy if my procedure was helpful.
First of all, you should make a list of tasks that are performed iteratively daily, weekly or monthly.
This includes regular meetings, checking the progress of the work process, checking the status of the issue list, and more.
This can be created relatively easily by interviewing all members of your own organization.
Then measure the time required to complete each task.
Then, the total time is described in the monthly report as the time required for "fixed".
In addition, if there are other unexpected and unexpected tasks, name and manage them.
Each member manages the time required for the task individually.
...
1 reply by Henry Seron
Sep 25, 2020 9:38 AM
Henry Seron
...
Hi Takeshi,

What you said is likely what I have been doing, I am registering the time that I spend on each task and I provide a report at the end of the week.

All this process is manual, I was wondering if there would be some kind of tool - a desktop or web app - that can help to do it easier. Anyways, recording my time will be helpful when for myself in the future when I place my application to get the PMP certification.
Henry,
I can't speak to the tools you're using, but it sounds like you are trying to blend a charging system configured for a functional based organization charging against individual projects, with projected work where people are assigned full time. Here is how I see it work in large matrix based organization structures:

The general support team charges to tickets. Charging against those tickets should be traceable back to the project that generated the work. The projectized work also rolls up to the project level budget, but it isn't broken down further or at least the same way.

An example is for project XYZ, every chargeline trees up to budget XYZ. The support team budget trees up to XYZ-a. The Implementation team trees up to XYZ-b. XYZ-a can be assigned to different tasks like XYZ-a1, XYZ-a2, XYZ-a3, etc. XYZb work is related to types of work at best, not to individual tasks. If you sit through a change board, you don't try to figure out how much time you spent for each change discussed. If you try, it's just expensive guesswork.

It can require a lot of work for accounting to break things into different buckets, so before we break things out into their own cost bucket, the question is whether it is worth the cost. Often the answer is NO unless we are considering large costs. Projectized people just charge to the project, not to individual tasks.

It's the cost of being projectized. You are dedicated to the project whether you are currently needed or not. The downside is occasional wasted time waiting for work. The upside is the reduction of waste waiting for a critical resource when you are needed.
Henry -

Manual time reporting is a Theory X practice unless it is supporting billing to clients as in law firms. Assuming you are working on one or a few projects, you should be able to estimate your allocation to those and just flat-line report the time spent week-over-week. Anything more than that is not likely to add much value.

The focus should be on how much value is being realized by the delivery teams, not on how utilized they are.

Kiron
Sep 24, 2020 7:55 PM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
...
Just to put this in a context where you have the possibility to investigate more we implemented TBM in the company where I am working on. Perhaps is too much for your requirement but I am writing the reference trying to add more information. You can find information by searching "tbm council org"
Hi Sergio,

Thanks for the tip, I am reading about it and seems very interesting. Looks like something that we could use in my company :)
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Sep 25, 2020 10:54 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
You are welcome. If you ask me, I would propose it because it is a very simple method. The input for everything is to make inputs inside a work sheet which basically have two components: hours applied to projects and hours not applied to projects. While I hate to make this type of things because for me has no sense to control hours in a worksheet I was in charge to implement this type of methods from long time ago. Just to add some myself experience the key point is to convince the people that this is not for acting as a police woman/man on them and sell the idea behind (I hope the idea is not to act like police woman/man....)
Sep 24, 2020 9:58 PM
Replying to Takeshi Miyaoka
...
I would be very happy if my procedure was helpful.
First of all, you should make a list of tasks that are performed iteratively daily, weekly or monthly.
This includes regular meetings, checking the progress of the work process, checking the status of the issue list, and more.
This can be created relatively easily by interviewing all members of your own organization.
Then measure the time required to complete each task.
Then, the total time is described in the monthly report as the time required for "fixed".
In addition, if there are other unexpected and unexpected tasks, name and manage them.
Each member manages the time required for the task individually.
Hi Takeshi,

What you said is likely what I have been doing, I am registering the time that I spend on each task and I provide a report at the end of the week.

All this process is manual, I was wondering if there would be some kind of tool - a desktop or web app - that can help to do it easier. Anyways, recording my time will be helpful when for myself in the future when I place my application to get the PMP certification.
At a previous employer, the developers used the Time Tracker feature in Jira and had the option to record time directly against their assigned tasks or on a timesheet. As a PM, I mainly used the timesheet as there typically weren't tasks assigned to me in Jira.

If implementing a new solution is not an option, does your ticketing system allow for a ticket to remain open for the duration of an implementation?
Sep 25, 2020 9:32 AM
Replying to Henry Seron
...
Hi Sergio,

Thanks for the tip, I am reading about it and seems very interesting. Looks like something that we could use in my company :)
You are welcome. If you ask me, I would propose it because it is a very simple method. The input for everything is to make inputs inside a work sheet which basically have two components: hours applied to projects and hours not applied to projects. While I hate to make this type of things because for me has no sense to control hours in a worksheet I was in charge to implement this type of methods from long time ago. Just to add some myself experience the key point is to convince the people that this is not for acting as a police woman/man on them and sell the idea behind (I hope the idea is not to act like police woman/man....)

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