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Topics: Agile, Change Management, Organizational Culture
AGILE Mindset/ Methodology
Hi ..
how i can know if some organization are READY to use or transform to agile mindset, methodology and agile project management?

What common pitfall in that transformation ?

Thanks
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Let me write about what helped me from close to 30 years to help organization in Agile adoption.
1.Agile is not a mindset neither a method. Is a matter of architecture. That the reason for using the word "transform".
2.Project management something does not exists. What exists is project management which is performed in different environments by using different approaches/method/life cycles.
3.Because is a matter of architecture you have to take into account it first of all. The first step is to understand the organization will use Agile because the need of a solution for an organizational problem. To put this in the framework of PMI, that´s something the business analyst role do. Time ago I wrote an article on the matter which the practical method to be used to decide this type of things, perhaps will help you https://www.projectmanagement.com/blog-pos...-right-solution
Andrianus -

A real sense of urgency on the part of the senior leadership team coupled with an appetite to change how value gets delivered at the grass roots/team level is a good starting point.

I've covered a number of the challenges with agile transformations in my on demand webinar here: https://www.projectmanagement.com/videos/4...-in-a-Waterfall

Kiron
Sergio made good points.
I've become skeptical of the term "Agile Transformation." It makes it sound as if an organization is going to stop their way of working and start something new. It's sold by some consultants as though it were as simple as re-tooling an assembly line, and senior executives think it's just a product that they're buying. Agility isn't something you buy and install, it's something you earn over time.

For starters, an organization is ready to become more agile if:
- the leaders and workers know that they need to respond to change more quickly, or know that they aren't keeping up with their competition
- they're willing to empower their teams and are open to experimentation (some experiments fail, but that's the point)
- their customers are willing to become a part of the development process
- they are willing to set aside time to regularly inspect and adapt

That last one is the key. If the teams regularly inspect their own way of working and are able to try new things in order to improve, then the organization will eventually become agile.
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Oct 15, 2020 9:29 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
@Wade, please let me say: each thing you introduce inside an organization transform it. Why? Because organizations are open and adaptable systems. For being successful with Agile, that is critical to understand. With that said, the problem with most of the people that claims will help the organization to transform to Agile are making the worst things and they are part of the problem. For example, from 25 years ago helping organizations to use Agile, the first question I do is: which will be the strategy to use: by evolution or by revolution? Then, I work on that. For example, you have more than 90% organizations with functional structures (which somebody call silos based architecture). It is quit impossible to act by revolution there because it is quit impossible to throw it away and start again, mainly because everything is related. So, including my actual organization, except for one or two special cases, I always work based on evolution.
Oct 15, 2020 8:54 AM
Replying to Wade Harshman
...
I've become skeptical of the term "Agile Transformation." It makes it sound as if an organization is going to stop their way of working and start something new. It's sold by some consultants as though it were as simple as re-tooling an assembly line, and senior executives think it's just a product that they're buying. Agility isn't something you buy and install, it's something you earn over time.

For starters, an organization is ready to become more agile if:
- the leaders and workers know that they need to respond to change more quickly, or know that they aren't keeping up with their competition
- they're willing to empower their teams and are open to experimentation (some experiments fail, but that's the point)
- their customers are willing to become a part of the development process
- they are willing to set aside time to regularly inspect and adapt

That last one is the key. If the teams regularly inspect their own way of working and are able to try new things in order to improve, then the organization will eventually become agile.
@Wade, please let me say: each thing you introduce inside an organization transform it. Why? Because organizations are open and adaptable systems. For being successful with Agile, that is critical to understand. With that said, the problem with most of the people that claims will help the organization to transform to Agile are making the worst things and they are part of the problem. For example, from 25 years ago helping organizations to use Agile, the first question I do is: which will be the strategy to use: by evolution or by revolution? Then, I work on that. For example, you have more than 90% organizations with functional structures (which somebody call silos based architecture). It is quit impossible to act by revolution there because it is quit impossible to throw it away and start again, mainly because everything is related. So, including my actual organization, except for one or two special cases, I always work based on evolution.
...
1 reply by Wade Harshman
Oct 15, 2020 12:40 PM
Wade Harshman
...
Revolution / Evolution is a good way of describing the issue. Thank you for that.
I agree with Wade on his perceptions of the term "Agile Transformation". I forget the publisher, but there is actually a list of most popular executive buzzwords every year. Agile, digital, AI, and many others become very popular among executives networking with each other.

The problem is the executives like to use the words, without understanding the meaning. They want to use the terms with their peers, much more than to do the things that the words describe.

What I observe for when I'm determining the readiness of an organization to really transform, is whether they are willing to actually do the thing described by the buzzword, or whether they want to change the terms to describe something completely different so an exec can say "We're doing agile in my company."
...
1 reply by Wade Harshman
Oct 15, 2020 12:41 PM
Wade Harshman
...
I'm 100% with you. I've gotten to the point that when someone uses the term "agile," I ask them to describe what they mean. Some people- those who are merely using buzzwords- get upset when I ask. For other people, it's a good conversation starter.
One pitfall is the inability to face the ugly truth. Not everything a company does is done well, but people are often emotionally invested in their way of doing things. They take it personally and may feel attacked or embarrassed if they feel criticized. Culture change needs to be part of agile transformation. I've seen agile transformation fail when culture change is overlooked.
Oct 15, 2020 9:29 AM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
...
@Wade, please let me say: each thing you introduce inside an organization transform it. Why? Because organizations are open and adaptable systems. For being successful with Agile, that is critical to understand. With that said, the problem with most of the people that claims will help the organization to transform to Agile are making the worst things and they are part of the problem. For example, from 25 years ago helping organizations to use Agile, the first question I do is: which will be the strategy to use: by evolution or by revolution? Then, I work on that. For example, you have more than 90% organizations with functional structures (which somebody call silos based architecture). It is quit impossible to act by revolution there because it is quit impossible to throw it away and start again, mainly because everything is related. So, including my actual organization, except for one or two special cases, I always work based on evolution.
Revolution / Evolution is a good way of describing the issue. Thank you for that.
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Oct 15, 2020 12:49 PM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
You are welcome. Those are the things I faced from long time ago each time some organizations hired me to help with Agile implementation (or others by the way).
Oct 15, 2020 10:57 AM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
I agree with Wade on his perceptions of the term "Agile Transformation". I forget the publisher, but there is actually a list of most popular executive buzzwords every year. Agile, digital, AI, and many others become very popular among executives networking with each other.

The problem is the executives like to use the words, without understanding the meaning. They want to use the terms with their peers, much more than to do the things that the words describe.

What I observe for when I'm determining the readiness of an organization to really transform, is whether they are willing to actually do the thing described by the buzzword, or whether they want to change the terms to describe something completely different so an exec can say "We're doing agile in my company."
I'm 100% with you. I've gotten to the point that when someone uses the term "agile," I ask them to describe what they mean. Some people- those who are merely using buzzwords- get upset when I ask. For other people, it's a good conversation starter.
Oct 15, 2020 12:40 PM
Replying to Wade Harshman
...
Revolution / Evolution is a good way of describing the issue. Thank you for that.
You are welcome. Those are the things I faced from long time ago each time some organizations hired me to help with Agile implementation (or others by the way).
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