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What tools do you all use to track multiple projects
I'm new to PM and my workload is growing into multiple ongoing projects. I worry about lower priority projects slipping through the cracks of my frazzled brain ;-) How do you folks manage multiple projects?
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Ryan -

Multitasking is not a great practice on many levels but if you are forced to do it, organizing your personal to-do lists in tools like Outlook, MS Note or others with a clear distinction between the urgent & the important can help.

Kiron
You could organize the various projects better with Wrike. Give it a trial version
MS Project, Clarity and now we are in the process to use MS Azure Devops.
Enterprise Project Management (EPM) refers to the practice of managing multiple projects on an organizational level. Almost all the major ERP’s (Microsoft, SAP, Oracle etc.), provide EPM solutions.

According to the Project Management Institute (PMI), these initiatives can include:
1. Using Project Management Software for consolidation of multiple projects and increase visibility across the organization.

2. Establishing PMO – Project Management Office.

3. Using stages of growth models to improve project-management capabilities.
I find this situation more about an efficient To-Do list that reminds you when your low priority actions are coming due.

PM assignments in a PMO can be a bit like cooking on a stovetop. You're actively working a very involved main dish on the front burners, but you still must occasionally tend to the side dishes simmering on the back burners. For each project, just like each dish, I have a planned list of things I need to do before completion. I keep those list separate, just like I don't combine all my recipes into one complicated mess.

Sometimes a side project is just simmering for a while and I only need to stir the pot occasionally, so I set myself a reminder in Outlook, or any number of apps available today. When the reminder prompts me, I review my recipe for what comes next, stir in the next ingredient, and return to the main dish. Like with cooking, that's a lot easier than continuously re-reading each recipe to see if I'm forgetting something.
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1 reply by Marcus Udokang
Oct 18, 2020 5:17 PM
Marcus Udokang
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Keith, I like your cooking imagery and metaphor. It's quite apt.

I'd like to add, it's not good to have too many cooks in the kitchen, for it can spoil the broth. Or, too many people involved in managing a project can ruin it. And, don't ever jump out of the frying pan and into the fire. That hurts.
If you're a micro-manager there is no escape from brain frazzle. Make your to-do list based on milestones and deliverables, practice making excuses and hope for the best.

If you are a delegator - assign responsibilities, work with your team to develop a reasonable reporting structure. Let your team advise you as to what is important, what needs your attention, where the risks are. Focus on leadership and coordinating with the executive level. Give your team room to maneuver.
Project Management system implemented at the organization level helps in managing project/s.Let it be 1 or multiple.However, preparing and following a 'To Do'List on daily basis for ALL Projects daily tasks and weekly and Monthly milestones monitoring helps.
I would start from a very basic "Project Overview". 1 row 1 project. And then add all your priority concern at column. And set up regular meeting with your Project/Program Management Team.
I've been doing so many years, but still I am now looking for more easy tool for this. Once you get any better idea, please also do me a favor. Thanks.
Oct 17, 2020 11:11 AM
Replying to Keith Novak
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I find this situation more about an efficient To-Do list that reminds you when your low priority actions are coming due.

PM assignments in a PMO can be a bit like cooking on a stovetop. You're actively working a very involved main dish on the front burners, but you still must occasionally tend to the side dishes simmering on the back burners. For each project, just like each dish, I have a planned list of things I need to do before completion. I keep those list separate, just like I don't combine all my recipes into one complicated mess.

Sometimes a side project is just simmering for a while and I only need to stir the pot occasionally, so I set myself a reminder in Outlook, or any number of apps available today. When the reminder prompts me, I review my recipe for what comes next, stir in the next ingredient, and return to the main dish. Like with cooking, that's a lot easier than continuously re-reading each recipe to see if I'm forgetting something.
Keith, I like your cooking imagery and metaphor. It's quite apt.

I'd like to add, it's not good to have too many cooks in the kitchen, for it can spoil the broth. Or, too many people involved in managing a project can ruin it. And, don't ever jump out of the frying pan and into the fire. That hurts.
Using the any project app like Trello, which is free, or Jira, can help.

Also you could implement Eisenhower's Urgent/Important Principle, listed in order of importance below.

1st) Do things that are important and urgent.
2nd) Do things that are important but not urgent.
3rd) Do things that are not important but urgent.
4th) Do things that are not important and not urgent.
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