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Returning to the office once pandemic ends and project management.
So the question is what issues or challenges do leadership will need to deal with once teams start returning to the office. And what is the best course of action to bring resilience and continuity? I guess we need to deal with the following issues

- Half the team working from home
- Policies for the team returning to the office
- The issue of communication (remote + office)
- Potential risks and response plan
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While the logistical challenges of safely having some percentage of staff back in the office before a vaccine or herd immunity occurs are new, the challenges of having a split team with some virtual and some co-located are not and there are a number of good ideas which can be explored for creating a resilient team under such circumstances.

Kiron
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1 reply by Rahul Patekar
Nov 09, 2020 1:49 PM
Rahul Patekar
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Thanks Kiron for sharing your valuable thoughts.
Rahul,
Great question, and something that many of us have been dealing with. My org provided high level guidance on travel and social restrictions. Within a region, senior leaders adjust these restrictions up or down within these confines, based on the situation. From there, each unit leader is given a lot of flexibility and empowered to meet the mission. Each of us has unique challenges we're facing, so locally the best solution can be tailored for each situation. Communication is key, and having too many direct reports can be exhausting. I've limited my span of control to four, and delegated. Trying to maintain fairness, consistency, and transparency is an ongoing challenge.
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1 reply by Rahul Patekar
Nov 09, 2020 1:54 PM
Rahul Patekar
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Thanks Ethan for sharing your perspective. Especially related to restricting direct reports.

Thanks
Nov 09, 2020 9:58 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
While the logistical challenges of safely having some percentage of staff back in the office before a vaccine or herd immunity occurs are new, the challenges of having a split team with some virtual and some co-located are not and there are a number of good ideas which can be explored for creating a resilient team under such circumstances.

Kiron
Thanks Kiron for sharing your valuable thoughts.
Nov 09, 2020 11:01 AM
Replying to Ethan Dwyer
...
Rahul,
Great question, and something that many of us have been dealing with. My org provided high level guidance on travel and social restrictions. Within a region, senior leaders adjust these restrictions up or down within these confines, based on the situation. From there, each unit leader is given a lot of flexibility and empowered to meet the mission. Each of us has unique challenges we're facing, so locally the best solution can be tailored for each situation. Communication is key, and having too many direct reports can be exhausting. I've limited my span of control to four, and delegated. Trying to maintain fairness, consistency, and transparency is an ongoing challenge.
Thanks Ethan for sharing your perspective. Especially related to restricting direct reports.

Thanks
I think some of the issues we will face are similar to what follows a major corporate restructuring and location change.

My employer was hit very hard by the affect on the travel industry, and so they have adjusted staffing levels, consolidated organizations, moved people to different jobs, and whatever they can think of to adapt. That level of change drives multiple issues like different stakeholder expectations, workforce disruption, and various issues related to working in a very different organization.

The physical footprint is also changing. Offices may be consolidated. Desks may be shared rather than dedicated to an employee. In some ways it may be like being on a business trip and working out of a hotel some days a week. People may seek work closer to home. Some may still have child care needs and not be able to return. There will be some inherent inefficiencies due to the new lack of a stable workplace. Even things like all the food vendors leaving due to lack of customers can have an impact on day to day office life.
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1 reply by Rahul Patekar
Nov 24, 2020 9:12 AM
Rahul Patekar
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True, people seeking and ensuring that they rent home near to the office is a real thing. I saw many of my colleagues shifted their places near to the office as teams started pouring in.
Nov 09, 2020 2:59 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
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I think some of the issues we will face are similar to what follows a major corporate restructuring and location change.

My employer was hit very hard by the affect on the travel industry, and so they have adjusted staffing levels, consolidated organizations, moved people to different jobs, and whatever they can think of to adapt. That level of change drives multiple issues like different stakeholder expectations, workforce disruption, and various issues related to working in a very different organization.

The physical footprint is also changing. Offices may be consolidated. Desks may be shared rather than dedicated to an employee. In some ways it may be like being on a business trip and working out of a hotel some days a week. People may seek work closer to home. Some may still have child care needs and not be able to return. There will be some inherent inefficiencies due to the new lack of a stable workplace. Even things like all the food vendors leaving due to lack of customers can have an impact on day to day office life.
True, people seeking and ensuring that they rent home near to the office is a real thing. I saw many of my colleagues shifted their places near to the office as teams started pouring in.

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