Project Management

Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Ethics, Leadership, Organizational Culture
If you see something, do YOU say something?
How successful can your team or projects be if you avoid having the difficult conversations regarding perceived sensitive or critical project/team related issues and concerns that could possibly include ethical issues or other conflicts? (The Undiscussables)

How can you encourage more speaking up, open discussions, and listening to each other’s perspectives to create an environment for greater project and team success?

How might we use the four values from our PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct: Responsibility, Respect, Fairness and Honesty to create safer and more trusting environments?

If you have seen others or yourself being treated differently after speaking up, what impact did that have when encountering future issues?

Please speak up, it's safe here!
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 3 next>
I take issue with your last point - "It's safe here".

In this age of internet nowhere is safe. Everything you write on a public forum can, and most likely, will come back and bite you. Not only that, it will be taken out of context and possibly modified to suite someone's objective to embarrass and/or weaken you.

All I'm saying is recognize the risks but don't necessarily avoid them. Say what needs to be said but say it in a professional, respectful way. That goes for any 'uncomfortable conversation' that you reference in your question.
...
1 reply by John Watson
Nov 17, 2020 8:49 AM
John Watson
...
Hello Peter,
Your point is well taken regarding the potential dangers and pitfalls of writing on public internet forums
Thank you!
John -

This question is near and dear to my heart as courage to speak up only comes when we are in a psychologically safe team environment, and the responsibility for building that falls on us as leaders but also on all of our team members and key stakeholders too.

Kiron
...
1 reply by John Watson
Nov 17, 2020 8:39 AM
John Watson
...
Hello Kiron,
Thanks for your comment. I agree it is everyone’s responsibility for building that safe environment, but how do you as a leader get that started and sustainable ? Please tell us more.
Glad seeing you bring courage into this.
Nov 16, 2020 7:06 PM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
John -

This question is near and dear to my heart as courage to speak up only comes when we are in a psychologically safe team environment, and the responsibility for building that falls on us as leaders but also on all of our team members and key stakeholders too.

Kiron
Hello Kiron,
Thanks for your comment. I agree it is everyone’s responsibility for building that safe environment, but how do you as a leader get that started and sustainable ? Please tell us more.
Glad seeing you bring courage into this.
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Nov 17, 2020 8:43 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
While Timothy Clark has his four step model for p.s., I subscribe to a simpler one: Plan it, live it, champion it. Plan it includes things like baking p.s. into the team's working agreements and gaining commitment from key senior stakeholders before the project gets rolling about its importance. Live it is modeling p.s. in all of your behavior & interactions. Champion it is rewarding team members that demonstrate it, coaching those that don't, and recognizing those who have the courage to fail and learn from that failure.

Kiron
Nov 17, 2020 8:39 AM
Replying to John Watson
...
Hello Kiron,
Thanks for your comment. I agree it is everyone’s responsibility for building that safe environment, but how do you as a leader get that started and sustainable ? Please tell us more.
Glad seeing you bring courage into this.
While Timothy Clark has his four step model for p.s., I subscribe to a simpler one: Plan it, live it, champion it. Plan it includes things like baking p.s. into the team's working agreements and gaining commitment from key senior stakeholders before the project gets rolling about its importance. Live it is modeling p.s. in all of your behavior & interactions. Champion it is rewarding team members that demonstrate it, coaching those that don't, and recognizing those who have the courage to fail and learn from that failure.

Kiron
...
1 reply by John Watson
Nov 17, 2020 8:56 AM
John Watson
...
Excellent Kiron, Thank you for sharing that. How do reward the team members who demonstrate it?
Nov 16, 2020 5:47 PM
Replying to Peter Rapin
...
I take issue with your last point - "It's safe here".

In this age of internet nowhere is safe. Everything you write on a public forum can, and most likely, will come back and bite you. Not only that, it will be taken out of context and possibly modified to suite someone's objective to embarrass and/or weaken you.

All I'm saying is recognize the risks but don't necessarily avoid them. Say what needs to be said but say it in a professional, respectful way. That goes for any 'uncomfortable conversation' that you reference in your question.
Hello Peter,
Your point is well taken regarding the potential dangers and pitfalls of writing on public internet forums
Thank you!
Nov 17, 2020 8:43 AM
Replying to Kiron Bondale
...
While Timothy Clark has his four step model for p.s., I subscribe to a simpler one: Plan it, live it, champion it. Plan it includes things like baking p.s. into the team's working agreements and gaining commitment from key senior stakeholders before the project gets rolling about its importance. Live it is modeling p.s. in all of your behavior & interactions. Champion it is rewarding team members that demonstrate it, coaching those that don't, and recognizing those who have the courage to fail and learn from that failure.

Kiron
Excellent Kiron, Thank you for sharing that. How do reward the team members who demonstrate it?
...
1 reply by Kiron Bondale
Nov 17, 2020 11:01 AM
Kiron Bondale
...
A well known example of this would be Etsy's three-armed sweater reward given to the engineer who shared the most spectacular failure.
There is a counterpoint. Some may use the opportunity to speak openly to express opinions and make comment on everything ending up dominating the discussion. Others will then just checkout.

The leader not only has to encourage open discussion but has to steer the discussion in a constructive direction. You also have to know when to take it private.

I agree with T. Clark's four stages but there is opportunity for abuse at stage 4; "Challenge the Status Quo", if not managed
John, thank you for raising this question. We all know (well, at least most of us :)) how important is to discuss ethics with our teams. In order to make this discussion natural and based on concrete aspects of the team, I would suggest using the Project Team Ethics Assessment, offered by PMI: https://www.pmi.org/-/media/pmi/documents/...14-4a8dc58758fe
...
1 reply by John Watson
Nov 19, 2020 1:38 PM
John Watson
...
Hello Simona,
Thanks for speaking up, and mentioning this resource, and hope everyone will check out this assessment. This assessment is a great ice breaker for having these difficult and or productive conversations. It can be started as anonymous, and as the results are reviewed it has shown how easily it turns in to a natural and comfortable exchange of ideas and feelings.
Nov 17, 2020 8:56 AM
Replying to John Watson
...
Excellent Kiron, Thank you for sharing that. How do reward the team members who demonstrate it?
A well known example of this would be Etsy's three-armed sweater reward given to the engineer who shared the most spectacular failure.
Page: 1 2 3 next>  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"That rainbow song's no good. Take it out."

- MGM Executive Memo after first showing of The Wizard of Oz