Project Management

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The 2017 PMI Strategic Plan contains 5 values (most of which rather are beliefs). Do you feel that they reflect what you belief PMI should be about?
At PMI we believe in:

1 Project Management Impact
Project management is a critical competence that has a positive influence on organization results and society at-large.

2 Professionalism
Accountability and ethical behavior ensure our commitment to PMI stakeholders.

3 Volunteerism
Volunteers and effective volunteer partnerships with staff are the best way to accomplish the Institute's goals and objectives.

4 Community
Bringing members of the global project management community together is the best way to facilitate their growth and the advancement of the project management profession.

5 Engagement
PMI encourages diverse viewpoints and empowers individuals to contribute to the project management profession and to the Institute.
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Thomas -

This is good "apple pie and motherhood" content, but there are probably a couple that are missing around:

1. A commitment to sustainability

2. Evolving the discipline itself to better respond to the "project economy"

I'd also argue that some of the specific actions taken by the Institute such as the revamp of the education partner program run counter to #4. Working for an REP (and interim ATP), it feels like PMI is more of a competitor than a partner for us...

Kiron
Good points, Kiron, thanks for sharing.

Sustainability did not yet get at the core of the organization, and also not in the PMBoK Guide.

With you I feel that the new ATP program is taking too much control about training. It destroys the creativity of the crowd, for example.
Yeah, but still they need to work or maybe they are working we are not seeing the result, I mean they need to work on countries such as Afghanistan, we have great talent but due to no center for exam here we faced lot of problems, me is a good example.

Now we have online due to COVID, but i still believe on all points you mentioned above.
...
1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Nov 25, 2020 12:39 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Ahmad,

I can imagine that it is hard to develop and do business in your country. But I feel you are part of the global community of project managers. Let me know if you need help.

As to the PMI services, you are right, that it is different in different countries. See, in Germany where I live, PMI started in 1988, 32 years before. And we created a Chapter (which was driven by US military staff then, and later by people from US companies like NCR, HP and IBM). I understand there were some ideas in Afghanistan to start a PMI Chapter, not sure where this stands.

Most NGOs or NFPs employ payed staff and have to pay for services from companies. Volunteers are not payed, except for expenses, but often invest a lot of their time and knowledge. The status of not-for-profit basically determines who gets profits. As there are no shareholders, profits of a NFP contribute to reserves or are invested in the purpose served.
I can be a bit of a cynic. When I read "volunteerism" from a business, I interpret that as, "Our business model requires free content and services from our paying customers." It may be structured as a non-profit business, but the paid employees and contributors profit.

Sure, volunteering can benefit the volunteers in various ways. That is the sales pitch. It's hard to get people to do free work if they can't see what's in it for them.
...
1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Nov 25, 2020 1:00 PM
Thomas Walenta
...
Hi Keith

PMI is indeed incorporated as a not-for-profit, so any profits they make stay with PMI (as reserves or are invested) and are not sent to shareholders, as there are none. I agree with you that if it behaves as a business and competes with partners, it raises question that should be answered.

PMI was founded by volunteers and prouds itself to be a volunteer organization building its standards, certifications and other products, running its Chapters - all by volunteers. Indeed there are more people applying for volunteer roles than roles, in some areas many more. A counterexample now is DA, which was acquired (from previous profits) and the content is provided by payed staff. Also, the transformation of PMI towards a digital organization is hard to accomplish with volunteers, so consultants and staff do that for money.

Importantly, PMI is lead by volunteers, on the Board, who are accountable to membership and employ the CEO.
Most volunteers get a lot out of the work they do, I am volunteering since 1998 and it formed who I am.

Jim Collins (author of from Good to Great) wrote that for-profits are fuelled by money to output money, as they re-invest some profits to grow business. He also wrote that this is not the case for not-for-profits, those are fuelled by volunteers (and their work), and money is not a mandatory output.
Nov 25, 2020 7:15 AM
Replying to Ahmad Mushtaq Abdurahimzai
...
Yeah, but still they need to work or maybe they are working we are not seeing the result, I mean they need to work on countries such as Afghanistan, we have great talent but due to no center for exam here we faced lot of problems, me is a good example.

Now we have online due to COVID, but i still believe on all points you mentioned above.
Ahmad,

I can imagine that it is hard to develop and do business in your country. But I feel you are part of the global community of project managers. Let me know if you need help.

As to the PMI services, you are right, that it is different in different countries. See, in Germany where I live, PMI started in 1988, 32 years before. And we created a Chapter (which was driven by US military staff then, and later by people from US companies like NCR, HP and IBM). I understand there were some ideas in Afghanistan to start a PMI Chapter, not sure where this stands.

Most NGOs or NFPs employ payed staff and have to pay for services from companies. Volunteers are not payed, except for expenses, but often invest a lot of their time and knowledge. The status of not-for-profit basically determines who gets profits. As there are no shareholders, profits of a NFP contribute to reserves or are invested in the purpose served.
Nov 25, 2020 11:34 AM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
I can be a bit of a cynic. When I read "volunteerism" from a business, I interpret that as, "Our business model requires free content and services from our paying customers." It may be structured as a non-profit business, but the paid employees and contributors profit.

Sure, volunteering can benefit the volunteers in various ways. That is the sales pitch. It's hard to get people to do free work if they can't see what's in it for them.
Hi Keith

PMI is indeed incorporated as a not-for-profit, so any profits they make stay with PMI (as reserves or are invested) and are not sent to shareholders, as there are none. I agree with you that if it behaves as a business and competes with partners, it raises question that should be answered.

PMI was founded by volunteers and prouds itself to be a volunteer organization building its standards, certifications and other products, running its Chapters - all by volunteers. Indeed there are more people applying for volunteer roles than roles, in some areas many more. A counterexample now is DA, which was acquired (from previous profits) and the content is provided by payed staff. Also, the transformation of PMI towards a digital organization is hard to accomplish with volunteers, so consultants and staff do that for money.

Importantly, PMI is lead by volunteers, on the Board, who are accountable to membership and employ the CEO.
Most volunteers get a lot out of the work they do, I am volunteering since 1998 and it formed who I am.

Jim Collins (author of from Good to Great) wrote that for-profits are fuelled by money to output money, as they re-invest some profits to grow business. He also wrote that this is not the case for not-for-profits, those are fuelled by volunteers (and their work), and money is not a mandatory output.
I do not think it can be understanding as values. As you mention they are belief, values are other things. So, they believe on that in the sense on keep the PMIĀ“s business running. The problem is in my humble opinion they must take the time to understand about their client vision, which is exactly what you are doing @Thomas. With that said, I really do not have information if the PMI did it or not.

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