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Topics: Integration Management, Portfolio Management, Using PMI Standards
Got my dream job as a PM, NOW WHAT?
Hello fellow PMs! I got my PMP this year and FINALLY found a fantastic job that I've very excited about!

My question- Do you have any tools, seminars, lectures, reading material you could recommend setting up PM processes at an organization that has never had any put in place?

My job is going to be to lead the organization on establishing solid PM processes for all sorts of different projects (academic, growth, tech).

Obviously I will heavily consult my PMBOK6th but I'd love a more practical guide, or real-life examples on how to implement the tools!
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Kelsey,
First off, Congrats on the new job!!

The first thing I would suggest you do is baseline your employer's current processes. I got my PMP after many years as a PM and found that much of what I had been doing was already standard PM practice across many industries. They created their own names for things, and process groups had been tailored, but it was mostly very familiar.

Chances are your employer is already using processes and tools that map to PMI standards already and you're not just operating in chaos.

Then you need to do a gap analysis to figure out where you want to be vs. your current state. That allows you to define the scope of your transition plan. Once you know what you want to change, you will be better equipped to narrow down your research into where you need deeper knowledge to implement organizational changes effectively.

Good luck!
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1 reply by Kelsey Culbertson
Dec 18, 2020 4:18 PM
Kelsey Culbertson
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Hi Keith,

Thank you so much for your response, it is very helpful and well communicated! I will read up on how to conduct a thourough gap analysis and use that to help direct me.

I'm coming from a situation where there was a lot of chaos and distrust, and unfortunately only a handful of the things I tried to implement stuck so I am particulary nervous to fall down that same hole.
This new company is much more progressive and open minded about PM processes though, and I don't think I will be fighting to convince them of the importance of it all I just want to make sure what I try to implement will be best practice. For instance, this new company uses an online project management service, which seems to be a very interesting and powerful so that is something I have not expereinced before... having tools to help.

I believe they will also offer continuous education funding for new training, I think I will use it for scrum master certification.

Again, thank you for your response!
Dec 18, 2020 2:30 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
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Kelsey,
First off, Congrats on the new job!!

The first thing I would suggest you do is baseline your employer's current processes. I got my PMP after many years as a PM and found that much of what I had been doing was already standard PM practice across many industries. They created their own names for things, and process groups had been tailored, but it was mostly very familiar.

Chances are your employer is already using processes and tools that map to PMI standards already and you're not just operating in chaos.

Then you need to do a gap analysis to figure out where you want to be vs. your current state. That allows you to define the scope of your transition plan. Once you know what you want to change, you will be better equipped to narrow down your research into where you need deeper knowledge to implement organizational changes effectively.

Good luck!
Hi Keith,

Thank you so much for your response, it is very helpful and well communicated! I will read up on how to conduct a thourough gap analysis and use that to help direct me.

I'm coming from a situation where there was a lot of chaos and distrust, and unfortunately only a handful of the things I tried to implement stuck so I am particulary nervous to fall down that same hole.
This new company is much more progressive and open minded about PM processes though, and I don't think I will be fighting to convince them of the importance of it all I just want to make sure what I try to implement will be best practice. For instance, this new company uses an online project management service, which seems to be a very interesting and powerful so that is something I have not expereinced before... having tools to help.

I believe they will also offer continuous education funding for new training, I think I will use it for scrum master certification.

Again, thank you for your response!
You need to understand that organizations are open and adaptable systems that trying to survive, growth and develop thanks to interact with the environment through the functions/process defined according to the strategy. So, the next step, in my personal opinion, is to understand how much value will add to implement project management process inside your organization as part of the strategy.
Kelsey,

congrats! Welcome to the PMP community.

"setting up PM processes at an organization that has never had any put in place" sounds like setting up a PMO and a lot of material exists that may help you with this. Please be aware that the average lifetime of a PMO is 2-3 years only, so while they might have initial success, they are then challenged. And a second thought: it is about people first, not the processes.

The comment of Sergio is spot on! Looking at the value provided by a PMO is key to success. And value is changing over time, so adaptation also is important.

PMI sponsored a research 10 years ago about PMOs and the results are published in The "Project Management Office (PMO): A Quest for Understanding (Final Research Report) by Brian Hobbs". A good compendium also about processes used by PMOs.

I built my first PMO in 1995 and my last one 2 years ago. I used this model to create it:
https://www.slideshare.net/walenta/buildin...rogram-64492923

In any case, if you need help, reach out.

Thomas
Set this up as your first project with an objective (deliverable), timeline (schedule) and anticipated effort (cost). This can be done through a Project Charter, the Charter should also set out your authorities and get official buy-in from management. Identify your stakeholders, constraints and risks and develop the Plan.

In the construction industry we think in terms of phases 1) concept, 2) design, 3) purchase, 4) implement, and 5) close-out. You don't have to do it as a straight line but the concept may help you track where you are at and what comes next. Caution - don't try to implement until you have fully defined the objective (destination).
Kelsey - Since you mentioned challenges with making things 'stick', consider learning more about 'change management.' There are many great webinars/articles here that address how to identify, access, and address areas of resistance. You may also consider the 3-day Prosci ADKAR Change Management training since you mentioned there was some funding available to advance your skills. Good luck!

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