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Topics: Using PMI Standards
Folder Structure
Hello together,
I am currently building a new folder structure for project in my company and I would like to follow PMP processes. Unfortunately, I find it difficult to implement the structure according to the processes. Do you have an idea how I can create a standardized folder structure for projects?

Thanks!
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Hi Sabrina. Personally, I avoid organizing project folders according to PM processes because doing so would cause confusion for my stakeholders. My projects are collaborative efforts and no one outside of the PM world thinks in terms of those phases. Instead, my approach is to organize in terms that anyone can understand. Each project has its own high-level folder/storage location. Underneath, I have a set of standard folders including Meetings (for minutes, attachments, etc.), Project Documents (business case, charter, schedule, etc.), and General Research/Reference (for items like articles/white papers/etc. related to our project topic). Depending upon the type of project, I include additional folders like Contracts, Finance (for budget, invoices, etc.), and Technology.
Aug 31, 2021 1:03 PM
Replying to Thomas Walenta
...
Sabrina,

you could go with a simple structure of the 5 process groups initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling and closing for project management artefacts. The project product would be documented either in a separate configuration mgmt system or under the folder execution.

The 5 process groups exist also in PMBoK Guide ed7, as a model.

At IBM 20 years ago, we had a 12 folder structure called project control book (PCB). Let me know if you want to see it.

Thomas
Hi Thomas,

that would be great to see.

Thank you!
...
1 reply by Thomas Walenta
Sep 06, 2021 8:07 AM
Thomas Walenta
...
IBM PCB2 (Project Control Book)

Folder Structure

0 standards & procedures
1 organization, people and resources
2 ??
3 plans and actuals
4 meetings
5 risks
6 ??
7 issues
8 delivery
9 sponsor information (agreements)
10 supplier information
11 requirements
12 quality
Aug 31, 2021 3:17 PM
Replying to Keith Novak
...
Folder structures typically follow some type of WBS. You will never find an ideal structure, because ideal depends on different job roles and how they use the information. How people use the information looks a lot like a matrix organization structure. Some want information related to specific functions (the WBS of the performing teams), while others want information related to project management oriented activities (the WBS of the project and business management teams).

As the prime user/architect of a folder structure, I will generally use something similar to the process groups as Thomas described because that aligns to my WBS. Bear in mind, that they are not strictly a sequence of phases. For example you will initiate new changes later in a project as more is known. Regardless, I am using information in phases so I generally want my information organized by time-frame.

Other information does not fit so neatly into time-frames. Reference documents and ongoing processes like change management may have a folder structure outside the project/phase based structure. This is similar to if you had a spreadsheet and have a table of constants that can be referenced by many formulas throughout the spreadsheet. A master schedule of the whole project, product requirements, or management processes get their own logical organization structure and are "matrixed" into the project-focused file structure since they span multiple phases.
Thank you very much for your detailed answer. I think I'm gonna try it in a similar way.:)
Sep 06, 2021 5:35 AM
Replying to Sabrina Lentini
...
Hi Thomas,

that would be great to see.

Thank you!
IBM PCB2 (Project Control Book)

Folder Structure

0 standards & procedures
1 organization, people and resources
2 ??
3 plans and actuals
4 meetings
5 risks
6 ??
7 issues
8 delivery
9 sponsor information (agreements)
10 supplier information
11 requirements
12 quality
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