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Topics: Talent Management
Junior PM thinks he is a senior
Anonymous
We have a junior project leader who presents himself and behaves as if he were a senior. However, in the past months, in a complex project, he has revealed some major weaknesses: diffulties in setting priorities, too much attention to details, etc. So much so, that the functional analyst on his team (a real senior) has taken to coaching and actually managing part of the project.
How to manage this situation?
One line of action will be to tell the analyst to back off, but how do we bring the project leader "down" from his lofty idea of himself?
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Network:13



Without having an understanding of the personalities and politics other than what is presented in the question, it would seem a good thing that the functional analyst is providing coaching. More fundamentally, having a "junior project leader" on a "complex project" seems to setting up the junior project leader for failure; he is probably in over his head.
Anonymous
I, too, have a Programme Manager, whose capabilities fall far behind the expectations of the role. Micro-managing an already established programme is causing division and conflict. Collectively the team are managing this discretely by outwardly appearing to heed the PMs edicts, but privately and separately using continuing best practice to manage the clients requirements. The difficulty anyone has with regard to working alongside an inexperienced PM with an inflated ego is that communication tends to be one way, and by that I mean the PM is good at issuing directives, but does not have the pateince or willingness to discuss or listen. Perhaps you should, as team, treat your PM as a Change project! Sorry I can't offer you very much more, but you are in a difficult position in that when you deliver your project successfully, you will probably not receive any plaudits, but your PM will take all the credit, and their weaknesses will not be exposed.
Network:609



Is it a dilema! we all have strengths and weaknesses dont we!

This person who has been assigned the role a Project Leader [junior] should be working with the Functional analyst [senior] and recognising each others roles within the project. I may agree that it has gone to his head he is probably feeling proud that he is acting as Project Leader and please do not knock his confidence by bringing him down that is the worst thing anyone can do to a person. Help him! support him by having him reporting directly to a Senior person who will oversee his work, how on earth is he going to learn! Longer term he will require coaching, training and regular reviews on his performance like everybody else within the organisation. In the mean time, give him recognition of the good things he has done for the project and professionally discuss the areas of weakness where he will be working with another Senior person to ensure the project is not jeorpadised...
Network:97



This is teamwork - everyone working together using their strengths and weakness to the benefit of the project. However the Project Leader could benefit from additional experience and perhaps a better understanding of the responsibilities of the Project Leader. A good mentor as well as additional education would benefit him.
Network:50



Anytime you enter in a new senior position/role, despite your mastery or extraordinary skills that made you a successful leader in the past; it is equivalent to being performing as junior one. This is because you are actually new on that particular position or project in a specific time. Talent is not married with Seniority. Seniority has major benefits but not necessarily makes you immune to failure too.

I am in agreement with Vasuola, the functional analyst and the lead should help and complement each other. The senior functional analyst should gently help to expedite the whole team to get success. (That’s the minimum expected and that’s the way teams works and become a key part of collaboration’s spirit).
Network:50



Anytime you enter in a new senior position/role, despite your mastery or extraordinary skills that made you a successful leader in the past; it is equivalent to being performing as junior one. This is because you are actually new on that particular position or project in a specific time. Talent is not married with Seniority. Seniority has major benefits but not necessarily makes you immune to failure too.

I am in agreement with Vasuola, the functional analyst and the lead should help and complement each other. The senior functional analyst should gently help to expedite the whole team to get success. (That’s the minimum expected and that’s the way teams works and become a key part of collaboration’s spirit).
Network:557



Ana

A lot of good postings and replies. It wil be difficult to provide you with an answer since it is unclear what role you have in the project. If you are the project sponosr the question you have to ask yourself is:

Is there a reasonable chance this pm is able to deliver the project against the set constraints with the help he gets today?

If the answer to the question is yes do nothing and support him.

If the answer is a clear NO replace him since the objectives of the project are most likely of more importance to the company as the personal objectives of the pm

If the answer is undetermined, consider if there are sufficient options to support the pm and the project to turn the answer into a Yes. In that case set up a mentoring/coaching program for the pm

Hopes this helps Hans

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