Project Management

Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Estimating, New Practitioners, Risk Management, Scheduling
Delivery of projects affected by 3th party factors
There are projects you can deliver at initial planned date. There are also projects that you can not deliver at inicial planned date, because of external factors out of your hands, and that indeed you include in your risks management, but definitivelly out of your hands. This last kind of projects are delivered on time, taking into account these factors correctly traced and your company is not penalized. Is it still considered a good project well managed?
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 <prev
Anonymous
Mar 17, 2016 7:35 PM
Replying to Michelle Daigle
...
Hi Luis,

I agree with most of the above. Where I have most often felt the challenges of schedule delays due to external factors, have usually been on two topics:

1. Procurement ETAs - It is challenging to baseline a schedule early on projects that involve significant procurement. I manage this by building in assumptions around delivery ETAs, tracking a related risk, requesting exepedited delivery where possible.

2. Contracting with third parties on integration projects, or hiring consultants to own hardware and switch upgrades - For some of the organizations we contract with, we know how long the process to finalize an SoW will take, so we work backward from the desired Initiating start date and begin the SoW process early. If possible adding a deadline in the SoW ensures the organization must hit your targets.

The above approaches can be effective when you're working with vendors with whom you have an existing relationship, as you then become familiar with their typical ETAs. The risk is higher with new external relationships.

In response to your last question, I believe if you manage through the external factors effectively, raising assumptions, constraints, related risks with at least a solid contingency, if no mitigation is possible, and have communicated the impacts to your schedule and plan well to your stakeholders, then you are probably managing it well. There are some things that are outside of our control as PMs.

I'm not certain if my scenarios are similar to what you're encountering, or relevant, but thought I would share.
Thanks Luis.
Mar 17, 2016 7:35 PM
Replying to Michelle Daigle
...
Hi Luis,

I agree with most of the above. Where I have most often felt the challenges of schedule delays due to external factors, have usually been on two topics:

1. Procurement ETAs - It is challenging to baseline a schedule early on projects that involve significant procurement. I manage this by building in assumptions around delivery ETAs, tracking a related risk, requesting exepedited delivery where possible.

2. Contracting with third parties on integration projects, or hiring consultants to own hardware and switch upgrades - For some of the organizations we contract with, we know how long the process to finalize an SoW will take, so we work backward from the desired Initiating start date and begin the SoW process early. If possible adding a deadline in the SoW ensures the organization must hit your targets.

The above approaches can be effective when you're working with vendors with whom you have an existing relationship, as you then become familiar with their typical ETAs. The risk is higher with new external relationships.

In response to your last question, I believe if you manage through the external factors effectively, raising assumptions, constraints, related risks with at least a solid contingency, if no mitigation is possible, and have communicated the impacts to your schedule and plan well to your stakeholders, then you are probably managing it well. There are some things that are outside of our control as PMs.

I'm not certain if my scenarios are similar to what you're encountering, or relevant, but thought I would share.
Thanks Michelle useful advices.
Page: 1 2 <prev  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

"Once, during prohibition, I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water."

- W. C. Fields