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Topics: PMO
Share a PMO workshop aha moment
Network:1617



Did you attend one of this year's or previous year's Building the Hybrid PMO Workshops? Did you have one or more aha moments? That is, a moment in which you experienced an epiphany of some kind followed by that exciting rush of enthusiasm to take an action of some kind on account of it all. If yes, can you share your aha moment? Don't be bashful, the aha moment that you share might very well trigger some thought, dialog, and reflection and become an aha moment for someone else.
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Network:2


I had so many aha moments! But here are the top 5 that I am sharing with my colleagues ASAP:

1. We have to treat the PMO like any other business unit of the organization and as such, we must understand the objectives and value add before we can discuss the means to achieving the objectives. This takes time, just like launching any department does.

2. If processes are what the organization needs, facilitate the creation of these processes with the team members rather than creating and mandating. Those who do the work are in the best position to design how the work can be done more efficiently, and if they create it they are more invested!

3. Agile is what we have been doing all along in our most successful projects! It is the ultimate way to mitigate risk and decrease the cost of change - the only thing constant in our current reality.

4. Project success is not black and white and it must be informed by the biases of your stakeholders. As such, reporting on performance has to consider the nuances of each project rather than simply reporting if it is on time, on budget, etc.

5. If people are not willing to be held accountable for a project outcome then they can't include it in the project business case - period!
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1 reply by Maya Kalach
Sep 24, 2019 10:17 AM
Maya Kalach
...
brilliant points
Network:336



Jul 27, 2016 4:54 PM
Replying to Julia Trabert
...
I had so many aha moments! But here are the top 5 that I am sharing with my colleagues ASAP:

1. We have to treat the PMO like any other business unit of the organization and as such, we must understand the objectives and value add before we can discuss the means to achieving the objectives. This takes time, just like launching any department does.

2. If processes are what the organization needs, facilitate the creation of these processes with the team members rather than creating and mandating. Those who do the work are in the best position to design how the work can be done more efficiently, and if they create it they are more invested!

3. Agile is what we have been doing all along in our most successful projects! It is the ultimate way to mitigate risk and decrease the cost of change - the only thing constant in our current reality.

4. Project success is not black and white and it must be informed by the biases of your stakeholders. As such, reporting on performance has to consider the nuances of each project rather than simply reporting if it is on time, on budget, etc.

5. If people are not willing to be held accountable for a project outcome then they can't include it in the project business case - period!
brilliant points
Network:878



I was not able to attend the workshops, but I've been spending the past 4 months researching and standing up a hybrid PMO. One thing I've learned is that the people that I need to support the development of the PMO don't care about tools, processes, and templates.

Okay, that's not completely fair. They just care more about the PMO's ability to deliver value. I've been driving a phased approach to building out the PMO so that we can deliver value with core PM functionality while working on additional functionality, tools, and templates that will create a more robust PMO experience.

The core was easy. The challenge looks like it might be with the additional things we want to implement. I've got a plan in progress and a COO who listens, so I don't expect adoption to be a huge challenge. I think the challenge will be the business' desire for more focus on projects, as opposed to more tools. I just need to make sure my value proposition is strong enough.
Network:1617



Aaron, allow me to share one of the PMO workshop "Aha Moments" for your consideration.

In the Building the Hybrid PMO Workshops, we advocate a PMO Golden Rule for PMO managers which is, "It's not your PMO." By that we mean, as the PMO manager, what you think the PMO should do and achieve is irrelevant. If you have a particular idea or approach in mind, keep it to yourself. Better yet, you should be "Switzerland", neutral, and not have or seek to advance your opinion on the matter. Why? It’s not your PMO.

So whose PMO is it? It’s the leadership team’s PMO. More precisely, the PMO belongs to the specific constituent leadership team members for whom the PMO was created and exists to serve. Therefore, it is what they want the PMO to be and achieve in terms of a codified PMO mandate (purpose and value of achieving that purpose) that is relevant.

Important to note, the core foundation of the Hybrid PMO is the leadership team determined purpose and value of the PMO which represents the ends to be achieved (outcomes and assessed value of outcomes). And based upon this core foundation, then and only then, the means to the ends such as PM functionality, tools, and templates, etc. (outputs) can be advanced.

Many PMO managers, especially first time PMO managers, view the core of the PMO in terms of outputs, not outcomes. This is problematic. For one, it almost always puts the cart before the horse and assumes that the PMO means to the ends (outputs) are valuable unto themselves and aligned to assumed business needs. More importantly, it gets the order wrong. The means to the ends are not first established and then balanced with the ends to be achieved; rather the ends to be achieved are first established. Then, and only then, the means to those ends can be determined. The ramifications of the differences in these two PMO manager mindsets are tremendous.

As an example, you wrote, “One thing I've learned is that the people that I need to support the development of the PMO don't care about tools, processes, and templates.” You’re right. So what do they, the people served by the PMO, care about? And not just off the cuff commentary about what they might care about, but rather what they care about in terms of their vetted, prioritized, and unanimously agreed to PMO outcomes and value that they want the PMO to achieve.

I would challenge you to think of the core of the Hybrid PMO as well as what a robust PMO experience is in a different light. That is, the core of the PMO is the leadership team determined purpose and value of the PMO, the outcomes, that establish the codified PMO mandate. The robust PMO experience is the continued successful delivery of the PMO, report period after report, of the outcomes that the leadership team wants their PMO to pursue and achieve. Hence, PMO success and maturity is viewed in terms of outcomes achieved, not outputs produced or even skills displayed. And certainly not effort.

Now consider your last sentence, “I just need to make sure my value proposition is strong enough.” Why? You don’t need to make sure “your” value proposition is strong enough. You shouldn’t even have one. Rather, you need to facilitate and help the leadership team establish and make sure “their” value proposition for their PMO is strong enough. Remember the PMO Golden Rule for PMO managers. It’s not your PMO, it’s their PMO. Hence, it’s not your value proposition, it’s their value proposition.

I hope this conveys the premise and potential for the Hybrid PMO. Andy Jordan, Jesse Fewell, and I are no longer conducting the Hybrid PMO Workshops, but if this is of interest to you, I (and I am sure they) would be happy to send you the Hybrid PMO Workshop slides, exercises, and tips for facilitating a leadership team determined PMO mandate (purpose and value of achieving that purpose). And, good luck with your Hybrid PMO..!
...
1 reply by Aaron Porter
Sep 25, 2019 10:56 AM
Aaron Porter
...
Thanks for the feedback! I am definitely interested.
Network:878



Sep 24, 2019 4:50 PM
Replying to Mark Price Perry
...
Aaron, allow me to share one of the PMO workshop "Aha Moments" for your consideration.

In the Building the Hybrid PMO Workshops, we advocate a PMO Golden Rule for PMO managers which is, "It's not your PMO." By that we mean, as the PMO manager, what you think the PMO should do and achieve is irrelevant. If you have a particular idea or approach in mind, keep it to yourself. Better yet, you should be "Switzerland", neutral, and not have or seek to advance your opinion on the matter. Why? It’s not your PMO.

So whose PMO is it? It’s the leadership team’s PMO. More precisely, the PMO belongs to the specific constituent leadership team members for whom the PMO was created and exists to serve. Therefore, it is what they want the PMO to be and achieve in terms of a codified PMO mandate (purpose and value of achieving that purpose) that is relevant.

Important to note, the core foundation of the Hybrid PMO is the leadership team determined purpose and value of the PMO which represents the ends to be achieved (outcomes and assessed value of outcomes). And based upon this core foundation, then and only then, the means to the ends such as PM functionality, tools, and templates, etc. (outputs) can be advanced.

Many PMO managers, especially first time PMO managers, view the core of the PMO in terms of outputs, not outcomes. This is problematic. For one, it almost always puts the cart before the horse and assumes that the PMO means to the ends (outputs) are valuable unto themselves and aligned to assumed business needs. More importantly, it gets the order wrong. The means to the ends are not first established and then balanced with the ends to be achieved; rather the ends to be achieved are first established. Then, and only then, the means to those ends can be determined. The ramifications of the differences in these two PMO manager mindsets are tremendous.

As an example, you wrote, “One thing I've learned is that the people that I need to support the development of the PMO don't care about tools, processes, and templates.” You’re right. So what do they, the people served by the PMO, care about? And not just off the cuff commentary about what they might care about, but rather what they care about in terms of their vetted, prioritized, and unanimously agreed to PMO outcomes and value that they want the PMO to achieve.

I would challenge you to think of the core of the Hybrid PMO as well as what a robust PMO experience is in a different light. That is, the core of the PMO is the leadership team determined purpose and value of the PMO, the outcomes, that establish the codified PMO mandate. The robust PMO experience is the continued successful delivery of the PMO, report period after report, of the outcomes that the leadership team wants their PMO to pursue and achieve. Hence, PMO success and maturity is viewed in terms of outcomes achieved, not outputs produced or even skills displayed. And certainly not effort.

Now consider your last sentence, “I just need to make sure my value proposition is strong enough.” Why? You don’t need to make sure “your” value proposition is strong enough. You shouldn’t even have one. Rather, you need to facilitate and help the leadership team establish and make sure “their” value proposition for their PMO is strong enough. Remember the PMO Golden Rule for PMO managers. It’s not your PMO, it’s their PMO. Hence, it’s not your value proposition, it’s their value proposition.

I hope this conveys the premise and potential for the Hybrid PMO. Andy Jordan, Jesse Fewell, and I are no longer conducting the Hybrid PMO Workshops, but if this is of interest to you, I (and I am sure they) would be happy to send you the Hybrid PMO Workshop slides, exercises, and tips for facilitating a leadership team determined PMO mandate (purpose and value of achieving that purpose). And, good luck with your Hybrid PMO..!
Thanks for the feedback! I am definitely interested.

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