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Practice Areas: Career Development, Leadership, Sustainability
Is PM overstepping its boundaries? We want your opinion.
Network:519



Please see this post. It raises a pretty important question, and we'd like your opinion. We've been accused of being a bloated profession...

http://www.projectsatwork.com/blog/People-...Projects/22764/
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Network:287



In responses to this quote, “I suggest that project managers stop inflating their roles in the corporate environment.”

If the word inflating means puffery or fluff, then your heading in an interesting direction. Some people have a bloated, self-absorbed idea about what project management can and should contribute to the success of an organization. Effective project management can make a difference in organizations, but it needs to be balanced with non-project related competencies.

If by "project managers" you mean the publications of the Project Management Institute, then we have to look at PMI's mission for advocacy versus an ethical expectation that it be truthful. PMI does a very good job of advocacy. However, as it expands its reach into enterprise and strategy materials, it is on the verge of embarrassing itself. There are a lot of very big-hearted and smart people in the PMI volunteer org and professional staff, but its work would be greatly enhanced by more critical thinking.
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1 reply by Richard Maltzman
Sep 24, 2016 1:09 PM
Richard Maltzman
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Greg, thanks. This is the type of discussion I wanted this to generate. I am a little biased, to be sure. I think the comment I got in the book review was a bit harsh and quite overstated, especially when it comes to ethics.

A project manager is in no way demonstrating puffery if he or she thinks a decision (even in the 'design' or 'concept' phase) is going to lead to a project outcome which is illegal, unethical, causes a social or environmental problem, or is in any way 'wrong'.

I also assert that it's not puffery or inflation to think about the long-term effects of your project's product, but rather a better way to identify threats and opportunities.

That's my opinion and it's why I was a little taken aback by the comment and why I wanted to see if there were others out there on either side (support or opposition of the comment about inflation).

Thanks again for your response. Any others out there?
Network:519



Sep 24, 2016 11:35 AM
Replying to Greg Githens
...
In responses to this quote, “I suggest that project managers stop inflating their roles in the corporate environment.”

If the word inflating means puffery or fluff, then your heading in an interesting direction. Some people have a bloated, self-absorbed idea about what project management can and should contribute to the success of an organization. Effective project management can make a difference in organizations, but it needs to be balanced with non-project related competencies.

If by "project managers" you mean the publications of the Project Management Institute, then we have to look at PMI's mission for advocacy versus an ethical expectation that it be truthful. PMI does a very good job of advocacy. However, as it expands its reach into enterprise and strategy materials, it is on the verge of embarrassing itself. There are a lot of very big-hearted and smart people in the PMI volunteer org and professional staff, but its work would be greatly enhanced by more critical thinking.
Greg, thanks. This is the type of discussion I wanted this to generate. I am a little biased, to be sure. I think the comment I got in the book review was a bit harsh and quite overstated, especially when it comes to ethics.

A project manager is in no way demonstrating puffery if he or she thinks a decision (even in the 'design' or 'concept' phase) is going to lead to a project outcome which is illegal, unethical, causes a social or environmental problem, or is in any way 'wrong'.

I also assert that it's not puffery or inflation to think about the long-term effects of your project's product, but rather a better way to identify threats and opportunities.

That's my opinion and it's why I was a little taken aback by the comment and why I wanted to see if there were others out there on either side (support or opposition of the comment about inflation).

Thanks again for your response. Any others out there?
Network:916



- discussion starter one: In a project, should the PM keep tight-lipped about design issues?Design is design, implementation is implementation (according to the suggestion). Right?
- discussion starter two:If a project manager sees a way to make a project’s outcome more sustainable, they should not say anything, right?The project manager should wait until the full set of requirements are implementable but should not pass any judgment on the product or service, because we are restricted as coordinators and expediters to ‘get-r-done’, right?

I belive that, The project and company organization will give the shape of the project manger as expeditor/coordinator/manger, and any comment will be issued should be verified according to project scope or go through change management process
Network:1150



The role who start working before a project exists and continue working after the project ends is the business analyst. Project manager is in charge to all related to define, execute, control and monitoring the work needed to create the solution the business analyst has helped to define working with stakeholders. The business analyst is aware of the organizational strategy beause it is a must to create the solution, If the strategy of the organization is related to sustaintability the solution will address that indeed.

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