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Topics: Career Development, New Practitioners, Resource Management
Is the degree classification linked to profesional success?
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During 2015 companies as Ernst & Young or PricewaterhouseCoopers, announced that they would no longer use the college or university grades as a way of selecting graduate recruits and they will scrap the requirement.

Nowadays, not only for graduates, but also for professionals I’ve observed that there are some companies that requested the marks or grades in your masters or degrees.

When it becomes to be employable, from your point of view, Is the degree classification linked to professional success?
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Key here is to understand: what does means "professional success"? You started other very interesting discussion about culture. And the mean for "professional success" has to be understanding inside an environment where culture could be a key indicator.
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I think that to a great degree, the degree classification is linked to professional success. Education teaches you "how to think" which is a great indicator of how successful one has the potential to become. Other factors include, but are not limited to: ethics, personality and values.
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Do you mean by classification "What standing or what was your average: Good, Very Good" ?

I yes, then some companies used to ask for transcripts but not anymore I guess. At least, I was never asked for transcripts. Just the main degree certificate.
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At least in India it is very prevalent to ask for education certificates(including graduate,under graduate etc) while joining a new company irrespective of number of years of experience a person has.And also it is mandatory to have certain percentage of marks to apply for any job.
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1 reply by Anupam
Oct 08, 2016 3:27 AM
Anupam
...
Agreed
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Each country have different marks or grades. There are some A, B, C... others that is only Good, Very Good. For example in Spain was from 1 to 10 where 10 is the hight score.

We know that some companies request it, but others no.

Not only E&Y or PWC, also in 2013, Laszlo Bock Vice President of Human Resources, explained during an interview with 'New York Times' changes in the selection process.
The US company was famous for asking all candidates a brilliant academic record and high scores on certain tests.

Everyone has their own definition of success, but in the end, choose things that make you happy is what will help you succeed.
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Oct 08, 2016 12:39 AM
Replying to Bala S Duvvuri
...
At least in India it is very prevalent to ask for education certificates(including graduate,under graduate etc) while joining a new company irrespective of number of years of experience a person has.And also it is mandatory to have certain percentage of marks to apply for any job.
Agreed
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Slightly related topic is that along with marks, most recruiters also tend to look at te past experience as a qualifying factor for all jobs. While this may be true for most of the job categories, esp. for lead positions, an alternate route could be to consider each candidate (read, asset) as an individual case and identify if the persons skills, interests and behavioural traits match with, as I call it, "what the chair demands".

In other words, if I have an interest in that work, I can learn about the technicalities and develop the skills.

And just because someone was unable to get "qualified" at the university level in a particular knowledge stream, that shouldn't really disqualify the person straight away to take up a job in that area. Obviously, I am not saying that should be able to perform in a job without being qualified in the required area (carry marks). My emphasis is on the fact that it should not be the ONLY criteria.

Hence, to directly answer the question, "Is the degree classification linked to professional success?", my opinion is a NO. Simply because, while Knowledge is critical to perform, Skill development is very crucial. Skill development becomes easier when the inclination / interest level aligns with what the job asks for.
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1 reply by Anupam
Oct 08, 2016 4:37 AM
Anupam
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Ideally it should NOT, but it's general criteria for selection.
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Oct 08, 2016 4:32 AM
Replying to Gopal Sahai
...
Slightly related topic is that along with marks, most recruiters also tend to look at te past experience as a qualifying factor for all jobs. While this may be true for most of the job categories, esp. for lead positions, an alternate route could be to consider each candidate (read, asset) as an individual case and identify if the persons skills, interests and behavioural traits match with, as I call it, "what the chair demands".

In other words, if I have an interest in that work, I can learn about the technicalities and develop the skills.

And just because someone was unable to get "qualified" at the university level in a particular knowledge stream, that shouldn't really disqualify the person straight away to take up a job in that area. Obviously, I am not saying that should be able to perform in a job without being qualified in the required area (carry marks). My emphasis is on the fact that it should not be the ONLY criteria.

Hence, to directly answer the question, "Is the degree classification linked to professional success?", my opinion is a NO. Simply because, while Knowledge is critical to perform, Skill development is very crucial. Skill development becomes easier when the inclination / interest level aligns with what the job asks for.
Ideally it should NOT, but it's general criteria for selection.
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I agree with Anupam. Generally at the start of the career its a defining criteria and is also required to be part of some companies as it is the base where you step into the professional world.To add to this, professional success is purely linked to the individual's skill levels,experience,goals and direction he wants to set in accordance with his vision. and how he wants to shape his future
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A degree is a degree. But those that excel should be rewarded for their hard work over those that just skirted by with less care and effort to do the best possible. So yes, a candidate earning top honors deserves the recognition and distinction. There should be some reward for working past the status quo, no?
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