Project Management Central

Please login or join to subscribe to this thread

Topics: Benefits Realization, Knowledge Management, Lessons Learned, Sustainability
The $50 million (or is it £ or €) question. What is the best Project Management Methodology and why?
Network:56



In context there are many organisations and institutions each promoting Project, Programme and Portfolio Management best practice.
Sort By:
Page: 1 2 <prev
Network:4574



That's a question of debate.

Rather it should be – Which effective methodology should I choose for my project?

Each methodology has its own advantages. They may not be practically applicable to the projects you are working. Review each to find the best that suits your project.
Network:2431



Is there a best? Ideally, the PMO wold want to provide the flexibility necessary to successfully deliver the organizations projects. A couple questions to ask ...
1) Are the requirements formalized? Are the stakeholders confident in the requirements? Plan Driven
2) If the project is large, and could benefit from multiple phases or checkpoints - Iterative
3) If the requirements are not completely known - Adaptive
...
1 reply by Carl Gomersall
Jan 16, 2017 2:40 AM
Carl Gomersall
...
Thank you Andrew.

You have raised a number of points which can be openly debated and are valid considerations.

Is there a best?

My perspective, my personal view is that each framework; process group and area of knowledge, is based on what we know (or is prevalent) at that particular instance.

There have been a number of iterations to these best practices over the years, which will continue. The standards that we have is a snap shot.

The Project Management Body of Knowledge is typical of this, v5 is in current use and will most likely be updated to v6 later this year.

"What is the best?" is a leading question that I posed and I was not seeking an objective or philosophical comparative of the framework, tools, and techniques.

It was more a question of individuals referring to what they new, of what the used, what works for them and why and had they adapted the core ITTO's based on their experience.

Once again thank you Andrew.

Regards

Carl
Network:9801



I think that there is no “best” methodology that works for all business types, sizes or industries.

As @Anupam noted, maybe the question should be something like "which I chose, or what fits better in my organization/project" there are ways to determine which methodology to use in my project/organization and how to effectively apply it.

@Carl, you asked me about the variables, when analyzing the methodology I can write few of many factors that should be carefully considered, as organization goals, constraints, stakeholders, risk, complexity.

When in this forum there is a discussion about methodologies, usually we tend to thing about agile vs waterfall...but what about PRINCE2. If you are working in UK for a government project, I can ensure you, that most of the project managers were perfectly trained and follow PRINCE2.
Or another example, working in a manufacturing environment, you'll find methodologies basis in Lean Six Sigma.

I hope the clarification of my point of view helps.
...
1 reply by Carl Gomersall
Jan 16, 2017 2:09 AM
Carl Gomersall
...
Good morning Maria.

Thank you for your email and clarification.

Regards

Carl
Network:264



Just to be a jerk, I'm going to point out that "methodology" is- at it's core- the study of methods, and you should study them all. Not that any of us know everything there is to know, but you can't make an informed decision between various methods if you don't know what the differences are between them.

There is a real value to an organization having a cohesive method and structure, but there's also an inherent danger if that doesn't include room for innovation.
...
1 reply by Carl Gomersall
Jan 16, 2017 2:07 AM
Carl Gomersall
...
Good morning Wade.

Thank you for your input, you are not being a jerk.

As a practitioner with over 35 years of successfully delivering complex $multi-million projects I place some of this success to drawing upon the knowledge and understanding of more than one best practice framework.

Regards

Carl
Network:1937



Carl. Because you are a Ph. D student please let me say that the use of the word "methology" is not right. So, after that, you have to understand how this topic has to be study. With basement in quality you have life cycle models, life cycle process based on that models, methods (what people name methodologies in the wrong way) based on that life cycle process, tools that support the methods. So, please let me say, that is the framework where you have to create your research.
Network:1212



Carl,
I am partial to PMI because I started in their methodology. Then I compared Prince2 with PMP, I discovered these differences:
A few features of the PMP qualification include:
It is indicative of your proficiency in using the PMBOK, the Project Management Book of Knowledge.
It validates your knowledge of "generally accepted" best practices and principles of project management.

A few features of PRINCE2 are as follows-
It is a broad, high-level, general framework of project management principles, which means it is recommended for and implemented on just about any kind of project.
It has a well-laid out and standardized an approach to project management.
It spells out the roles and responsibilities of each member of the team tasked with managing the project.
It divides the master project plan into Project Plans, Stage Plans, and Team Plans, which eliminates ambiguity and makes it easier to execute the project.
It is both project and process-focused.

I will atest I like PMP now I have studied and passed the examination
...
1 reply by Carl Gomersall
Jan 16, 2017 1:58 AM
Carl Gomersall
...
Good morning John.

Thank you for your email.

This provides me with the kind of answer that I was hoping the question would provide.

It is not a research question if it was it would be framed to reflect this intent and I must say that I take offence to the attempt to belittle my understanding of the word methodology by Sergio.

I have already created a Conceptual Framework which includes many of the Theoretical Frameworks which are used by practitioners.

Thank you for your reply John.

It is greatly appreciated, have a great day.

Regards

Carl
Network:56



Jan 11, 2017 11:36 PM
Replying to John Rice
...
Carl,
I am partial to PMI because I started in their methodology. Then I compared Prince2 with PMP, I discovered these differences:
A few features of the PMP qualification include:
It is indicative of your proficiency in using the PMBOK, the Project Management Book of Knowledge.
It validates your knowledge of "generally accepted" best practices and principles of project management.

A few features of PRINCE2 are as follows-
It is a broad, high-level, general framework of project management principles, which means it is recommended for and implemented on just about any kind of project.
It has a well-laid out and standardized an approach to project management.
It spells out the roles and responsibilities of each member of the team tasked with managing the project.
It divides the master project plan into Project Plans, Stage Plans, and Team Plans, which eliminates ambiguity and makes it easier to execute the project.
It is both project and process-focused.

I will atest I like PMP now I have studied and passed the examination
Good morning John.

Thank you for your email.

This provides me with the kind of answer that I was hoping the question would provide.

It is not a research question if it was it would be framed to reflect this intent and I must say that I take offence to the attempt to belittle my understanding of the word methodology by Sergio.

I have already created a Conceptual Framework which includes many of the Theoretical Frameworks which are used by practitioners.

Thank you for your reply John.

It is greatly appreciated, have a great day.

Regards

Carl
Network:56



Jan 11, 2017 1:29 PM
Replying to Wade Harshman
...
Just to be a jerk, I'm going to point out that "methodology" is- at it's core- the study of methods, and you should study them all. Not that any of us know everything there is to know, but you can't make an informed decision between various methods if you don't know what the differences are between them.

There is a real value to an organization having a cohesive method and structure, but there's also an inherent danger if that doesn't include room for innovation.
Good morning Wade.

Thank you for your input, you are not being a jerk.

As a practitioner with over 35 years of successfully delivering complex $multi-million projects I place some of this success to drawing upon the knowledge and understanding of more than one best practice framework.

Regards

Carl
Network:56



Jan 11, 2017 12:13 PM
Replying to Mayte Mata-Sivera
...
I think that there is no “best” methodology that works for all business types, sizes or industries.

As @Anupam noted, maybe the question should be something like "which I chose, or what fits better in my organization/project" there are ways to determine which methodology to use in my project/organization and how to effectively apply it.

@Carl, you asked me about the variables, when analyzing the methodology I can write few of many factors that should be carefully considered, as organization goals, constraints, stakeholders, risk, complexity.

When in this forum there is a discussion about methodologies, usually we tend to thing about agile vs waterfall...but what about PRINCE2. If you are working in UK for a government project, I can ensure you, that most of the project managers were perfectly trained and follow PRINCE2.
Or another example, working in a manufacturing environment, you'll find methodologies basis in Lean Six Sigma.

I hope the clarification of my point of view helps.
Good morning Maria.

Thank you for your email and clarification.

Regards

Carl
Network:56



Jan 11, 2017 6:40 AM
Replying to Andrew Craig
...
Is there a best? Ideally, the PMO wold want to provide the flexibility necessary to successfully deliver the organizations projects. A couple questions to ask ...
1) Are the requirements formalized? Are the stakeholders confident in the requirements? Plan Driven
2) If the project is large, and could benefit from multiple phases or checkpoints - Iterative
3) If the requirements are not completely known - Adaptive
Thank you Andrew.

You have raised a number of points which can be openly debated and are valid considerations.

Is there a best?

My perspective, my personal view is that each framework; process group and area of knowledge, is based on what we know (or is prevalent) at that particular instance.

There have been a number of iterations to these best practices over the years, which will continue. The standards that we have is a snap shot.

The Project Management Body of Knowledge is typical of this, v5 is in current use and will most likely be updated to v6 later this year.

"What is the best?" is a leading question that I posed and I was not seeking an objective or philosophical comparative of the framework, tools, and techniques.

It was more a question of individuals referring to what they new, of what the used, what works for them and why and had they adapted the core ITTO's based on their experience.

Once again thank you Andrew.

Regards

Carl
Page: 1 2 <prev  

Please login or join to reply

Content ID:
ADVERTISEMENTS

Sometimes the road less traveled is less traveled for a reason.

- Jerry Seinfeld

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsors