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Topics: Agile, Quality, Scrum
What's The Difference Between Scrum & Kanban?
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What's The Difference Between Scrum & Kanban?
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Do you think they are the same thing? what do you think are the differences?

Open discussion to help new practicioners.
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They are not the same thing, but they compliment each other very nicely.

Scrum is an Agile framework for developing products based on empericism. In Scrum, the developers must be empowered and self-managing.

Kanban is a "pull" system of Lean inventory management that has been widely adapted for development teams.

Kanban boards work very well with Scrum teams because the self-managing development teams can pull work from the board and create their increments. However, Kanban predates Scrum (by decades), and there is no requirement that Scrum teams use Kanban. The board is merely a tool that Scrum teams can choose to use if they decide to do so.
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Hi George,

Whilst the end result may be the same, i.e. delivering early and often, Kanban can be implemented using a team that hasn’t had exposure to the process before.

There aren’t any prescribed roles in Kanban. Scrum would require a sea change in organisational capability.

You wouldn’t be able to successfully implement Scrum without a competent Scrum Master or Product Owner (plus team members of course).

Kanban typically isn’t timeboxed either. Scrum is defined by its iterations

Regards,

Darren Kosa
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Both are methodologies that can be used to perform agile type project management. Kanban is typically used for product development and focuses on four principals: visualize work, limit work in process, focus on flow, continuous improvement. Scrum is an agile methodology of managing a project through iterations with frequent cycles to achieve continuous improvement.
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I have seen Kanban used as the first step in the migration from loosely managed waterfall to more disciplined Scrum methodologies. Having the user stories identified and visible provides a new and unambiguous means for a team to get behind a project. Workload imbalances are clearly visible as are the bottlenecks.
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Kanban is not an alternative to Scrum. Kanban is not a development process in itself, it’s just a simple method for managing work flow, whereas Scrum is a much more specifically defined development process. That’s why when you compared 23 Scrum rules and 2 Kanban rules, you came up with 25. They are orthogonal.
Many folks use a kanban board to manage their Scrum process or other agile/lean development practices.
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1 reply by George Lewis
Mar 18, 2017 8:54 AM
George Lewis
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Hussein - I agree...
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Mar 18, 2017 3:12 AM
Replying to Alaa Hussein
...
Kanban is not an alternative to Scrum. Kanban is not a development process in itself, it’s just a simple method for managing work flow, whereas Scrum is a much more specifically defined development process. That’s why when you compared 23 Scrum rules and 2 Kanban rules, you came up with 25. They are orthogonal.
Many folks use a kanban board to manage their Scrum process or other agile/lean development practices.
Hussein - I agree...
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The table in this article ( https://goo.gl/zR0nr7 ) gives a nice overview and includes a third methodology called Scrumban, which is a combination of both.
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1 reply by George Lewis
Mar 18, 2017 4:56 PM
George Lewis
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Interesting, I had not hear about this concept before...

Kanban doesn't impose strict constraints, process is more flexible. Therefore it fits best for support, maintenance teams or continuous product manufacturing. Scrumban uses mixed techniques of both methodologies. It combines basic features of Scrum and flexibility of Kanban.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=scrumban+vs+scrum&*&spf=206
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Mar 18, 2017 9:02 AM
Replying to Martin Metzger
...
The table in this article ( https://goo.gl/zR0nr7 ) gives a nice overview and includes a third methodology called Scrumban, which is a combination of both.
Interesting, I had not hear about this concept before...

Kanban doesn't impose strict constraints, process is more flexible. Therefore it fits best for support, maintenance teams or continuous product manufacturing. Scrumban uses mixed techniques of both methodologies. It combines basic features of Scrum and flexibility of Kanban.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=scrumban+vs+scrum&*&spf=206
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The very first project I managed was given to me because I had just attained my Scrum Masters certificate. It failed big time! Because I was the only one who knew Scrum and my knowledge was not trusted. I don't put that on me. I tried teaching it but it was too much of an extreme from our waterfall approach.

I know utilize kanban more for the projects. Let them visualize the stories for estimating and developing our sprints (I tend to call the phases and not sprints because any scrum term still scares them). Our programmers don't like to communicate. They just want to get their work done. So daily scrums didn't work. I was "wasting" 15 minutes of their day. So I do 2-3 meetings a week and I just call them "project update meetings."

I like the kanban approach because it is visualized by all. The programmers can see progress by moving their tasks from an in progress status to a ready for testing. They can for the most part pick what they want to put in the in progress status on their own. They take ownership.

I'm still working with them to do the actual moving of the tasks in the visual board. They don't want to do that...they just want to program. Baby steps.
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