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Topics: Construction, Scheduling, Strategy
Succesfull 4D BIM implementation, who made it?
Network:105674



Anyone did a successful implementation/integration of BIM and Schedule?
What was use?
What where the software use? Any lessons learned to share?
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Network:105674



BIM (CAD in 3 D) is a great collaboration tool for large project involving many professionals engineers of various trade and architects. It avoid many error at the design phase, less costly then on construction site.
Adding the 4 dimension with time (schedule) can bring new improvement. Such as changing the sequence of work.
I was involve in a project using BIM, but we didn't try to link with the schedule.
Anyone here was involve in a 4 D BIM
...
1 reply by Jonathan Murcia
Jun 22, 2017 5:11 PM
Jonathan Murcia
...
I have had the same doubt...
Network:289



Mar 29, 2017 9:22 PM
Replying to Vincent Guerard
...
BIM (CAD in 3 D) is a great collaboration tool for large project involving many professionals engineers of various trade and architects. It avoid many error at the design phase, less costly then on construction site.
Adding the 4 dimension with time (schedule) can bring new improvement. Such as changing the sequence of work.
I was involve in a project using BIM, but we didn't try to link with the schedule.
Anyone here was involve in a 4 D BIM
I have had the same doubt...
Network:76



We are interested in 4D, 5D BIM but would like to further to 7D BIM in Ops environment. Our challenge is to decide on the best suited software. We do design work as well as shutdown; quick-paced assistance to our clients. Using successful 4D, 5D BIM will be a strong advantage, however we have not been able to get the right partner for this. Seems software companies want to sell their product only and do not seem interested in developing the right solution for us PM professionals. Anyone have the same challenge?
...
1 reply by Vincent Guerard
Oct 03, 2018 10:40 AM
Vincent Guerard
...
Raymond,

That is a major problem, software company believe they don't need the user's input and that all software can be used out of the box.

A few years ago I was involved in a project to bring 3D parts to one of the 3D design tools. This was financed by a large corporation for its internal use. The 3D design software didn't get involved, not in their business!
Network:146



I am keenly following this discussion. in the last month I have taken every chance to consume information on BIM and how progressive organisations are adopting it in 2018. I have to say I have learnt a lot.

In the last one year I have been involved in a project where though i couldnt have pin pointed it earlier has so many integration similarities with a BIM setup.

We were doing a mineral Separation plant upgrade and we had only a 30 day window of shutdown. We had to make sure we use every capability possible to make this happen and this required advanced planning on our side.

Meet the use of:
1. Navisworks freedom 2017, The whole upgrade was modeled in 3D to ensure a rather sleek visualization of objects in the plant i.e. pumps, pipelines, motors, valves and hoppers.

2. We had a single depository of documentations, drawings and designs so that you have only one source of information for the whole team. You create versions as you go and update so that the next person can access the latest version. Used Sharepoint to make this possible.

3. We build up the Schedule as a direct product of the model. Such that we deconstructed every part of the plant into a single piece, a steel bar, a bolt, a pump, a pipe, a valve, a platform. This enabled us to estimate timeline inform of time to rig from laydown to site, rig it to place, install and bolt it down.
As you can tell it is extreme precision but after weeks of making this possible the implementation and time tracking and progress reporting was a easy part.
This also helped with Material take off and thus procurement was also precise and predictable.

I could go on but the comment is becoming an article in itself.
Bottomline; an Integrated system is the way to go.

Visualizing a project and linking it to schedule is possible and worth the trouble.
Network:146



To add on to my comment.

All above integration tools and more we used to ensure:

1. Clash Detection - installing different disciplines of materials and equipment means you have to get rid of geometrical inconsistencies earlier before construction starts. Using BIM you bring the plan together in visual to detect clashes and overlaps. you can also modify aesthetic and improve safety in terms of setting up maintenance platforms and work spaces.

2. Mitigate Risks. The best way to avoid rigging issues I found is trying to rig a machine into a plant after building. If it doesn't fit it presents a bigger risk to the project. You can do this with a model and upgrade rigging studies accordingly and in time before construction. This is an easy way to decide the construct-ability and Request for Improvements/Information beforehand.

3. Analysis. What better way would you ask to make discussions on project consumption, machine positions, lay-down areas for different materials and the like? BIM makes this possible.

4. Time and Cost Estimation.$D & 5D)
You get a clear understanding of project phases, budget requirements and formulate alternatives early in the project. This is an effective way to predict consequences into the executive decisions and improve their reliability.

5. Integration.

All these measures are to ensure integration. Communication and decision making is so integral that the team is almost always in the same page as to the chages or progress.

6. Quantity Take off

Simply stated; with a model I can count how much material I need and make informed decisions on procurement. If I already have material in the yard, It is an easier way to confirm quantities and quality.
...
2 replies by Kristian Soini and Vincent Guerard
Oct 03, 2018 10:44 AM
Vincent Guerard
...
Nice summary of information, Have you implemented it to another level than 3D?
Oct 04, 2018 1:34 AM
Kristian Soini
...
Thanks for the insight Dennis. Mind me asking if the modelspace was produced with Inventor or Revit or something else? I'm looking to implement 3D CAD and BIM to some degree.
Network:105674



Sep 25, 2018 4:44 AM
Replying to Raymond Van Tonder
...
We are interested in 4D, 5D BIM but would like to further to 7D BIM in Ops environment. Our challenge is to decide on the best suited software. We do design work as well as shutdown; quick-paced assistance to our clients. Using successful 4D, 5D BIM will be a strong advantage, however we have not been able to get the right partner for this. Seems software companies want to sell their product only and do not seem interested in developing the right solution for us PM professionals. Anyone have the same challenge?
Raymond,

That is a major problem, software company believe they don't need the user's input and that all software can be used out of the box.

A few years ago I was involved in a project to bring 3D parts to one of the 3D design tools. This was financed by a large corporation for its internal use. The 3D design software didn't get involved, not in their business!
...
1 reply by Raymond Van Tonder
Oct 09, 2018 8:56 AM
Raymond Van Tonder
...
Vincent thanks for your reply.
We have looked at various software packages including Revit, Inventor, Synchro and others. The model have to be build in design software; we use 3D scans where as-built information is not available and model in 3D using Inventor and Revit. The challenge is that the schedule integration has to be done using the design software e.g. Revit and then exported to Navisworks for viewing with the Freedom 2019 edition after the 4D integration.
This is okay on projects where we do the design from an Engineering perspective, however very few clients have updated as-built 3D models for e.g. shutdown planning and it is not financially viable to do 4D in such a case. The assumption we make is that 4D currently is only practical where active design work is involved and not on smaller-scale projects and therefore the practicality from a value-add perspective is in question on these projects.
Network:105674



Oct 03, 2018 1:18 AM
Replying to Dennis Githinji Mwaniki
...
To add on to my comment.

All above integration tools and more we used to ensure:

1. Clash Detection - installing different disciplines of materials and equipment means you have to get rid of geometrical inconsistencies earlier before construction starts. Using BIM you bring the plan together in visual to detect clashes and overlaps. you can also modify aesthetic and improve safety in terms of setting up maintenance platforms and work spaces.

2. Mitigate Risks. The best way to avoid rigging issues I found is trying to rig a machine into a plant after building. If it doesn't fit it presents a bigger risk to the project. You can do this with a model and upgrade rigging studies accordingly and in time before construction. This is an easy way to decide the construct-ability and Request for Improvements/Information beforehand.

3. Analysis. What better way would you ask to make discussions on project consumption, machine positions, lay-down areas for different materials and the like? BIM makes this possible.

4. Time and Cost Estimation.$D & 5D)
You get a clear understanding of project phases, budget requirements and formulate alternatives early in the project. This is an effective way to predict consequences into the executive decisions and improve their reliability.

5. Integration.

All these measures are to ensure integration. Communication and decision making is so integral that the team is almost always in the same page as to the chages or progress.

6. Quantity Take off

Simply stated; with a model I can count how much material I need and make informed decisions on procurement. If I already have material in the yard, It is an easier way to confirm quantities and quality.
Nice summary of information, Have you implemented it to another level than 3D?
...
1 reply by Dennis Githinji Mwaniki
Oct 04, 2018 4:03 AM
Dennis Githinji Mwaniki
...
On this one we couldn't really on an official level. We had all the Data to do it but between doing it and the initiation it'd have delayed the start of the project.

but I worked with one person who has done it and he was very upbeat about it, only we got that time disadvantage, and the fact that most others were skeptical been the first time..
Network:18



Oct 03, 2018 1:18 AM
Replying to Dennis Githinji Mwaniki
...
To add on to my comment.

All above integration tools and more we used to ensure:

1. Clash Detection - installing different disciplines of materials and equipment means you have to get rid of geometrical inconsistencies earlier before construction starts. Using BIM you bring the plan together in visual to detect clashes and overlaps. you can also modify aesthetic and improve safety in terms of setting up maintenance platforms and work spaces.

2. Mitigate Risks. The best way to avoid rigging issues I found is trying to rig a machine into a plant after building. If it doesn't fit it presents a bigger risk to the project. You can do this with a model and upgrade rigging studies accordingly and in time before construction. This is an easy way to decide the construct-ability and Request for Improvements/Information beforehand.

3. Analysis. What better way would you ask to make discussions on project consumption, machine positions, lay-down areas for different materials and the like? BIM makes this possible.

4. Time and Cost Estimation.$D & 5D)
You get a clear understanding of project phases, budget requirements and formulate alternatives early in the project. This is an effective way to predict consequences into the executive decisions and improve their reliability.

5. Integration.

All these measures are to ensure integration. Communication and decision making is so integral that the team is almost always in the same page as to the chages or progress.

6. Quantity Take off

Simply stated; with a model I can count how much material I need and make informed decisions on procurement. If I already have material in the yard, It is an easier way to confirm quantities and quality.
Thanks for the insight Dennis. Mind me asking if the modelspace was produced with Inventor or Revit or something else? I'm looking to implement 3D CAD and BIM to some degree.
...
1 reply by Dennis Githinji Mwaniki
Oct 04, 2018 3:57 AM
Dennis Githinji Mwaniki
...
Definately Revit
Network:146



Oct 04, 2018 1:34 AM
Replying to Kristian Soini
...
Thanks for the insight Dennis. Mind me asking if the modelspace was produced with Inventor or Revit or something else? I'm looking to implement 3D CAD and BIM to some degree.
Definately Revit
Network:146



Oct 03, 2018 10:44 AM
Replying to Vincent Guerard
...
Nice summary of information, Have you implemented it to another level than 3D?
On this one we couldn't really on an official level. We had all the Data to do it but between doing it and the initiation it'd have delayed the start of the project.

but I worked with one person who has done it and he was very upbeat about it, only we got that time disadvantage, and the fact that most others were skeptical been the first time..
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