Project Management

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What industry is Project Management?
What industry is Project Management?

When I came to Saudi Arabia, my employer provided training services for the Saudi National Guard, and I started to develop training curriculums for them. What I observed was the project and program management of the provided services. My desire to learn about project management stem from my involvement. I studied my masters and PMP for the next five years. Now I want to do more with the knowledge and skills I have learned.

In my spare time, I used job search engines like Indeed, USA Jobs, and Monster for PMP employment opportunities. What I discover is the purpose of my question. Most job postings for PMP certified is in the IT industry, or if I looked specifically in Construction Management, I find opportunity. So, I am asking for your opinion, is project management industry or skill set back with particular field experience?

I know based on a functional versus a project focused organization, we could be an addition or driving force for our assigned projects.
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Mar 31, 2017 12:49 PM
Replying to Mayte Mata-Sivera
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Usually, I don't to make advertising of my contributions, but in this case, I'll do an exception.

If you'll take a look to my the presentation about social media that I presented more than one month ago, there is a slide that will show you the numbers of different industries and companies that have project management. I extracted the information from LinkedIn.

If you love engines, try LinkedIn to get information.

https://www.projectmanagement.com/presenta...ng-Social-Media

Hope it helps.
Mayte,
Thank you for the Advert on social media.
What is your opinion on project management being an industry or skill set back with particular field experience?
Mar 31, 2017 1:08 PM
Replying to Igor Zdorovyak
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Project Management can be utilized in all industries. There are specific tasks/practices that one has to follow as it applied to the specific industry. Personally I used in Financial, IT, Pharmaceutical, Retail, Conglomerate, Shipping, Healthcare.
Igor,
The examples you present sounds as if you have operated in functional organizations and resources are departmentalized, true?
Apr 01, 2017 6:01 AM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
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There is some points here. The first one is: each person in this world is a project manager because she/he performs project management activities from the time she/he wakes up to the time she/he returns to bed. So, it is not a matter of industry. It is a matter of personal life. Second, you can analyze it thinking in a way of perform project management: PMI, IPMA, GPM, PRINCE2 where some of them are not methods (are guidelines) and others are methods which apply guidelines (PRINCE2). Which all that say then there is not industry. It is up to you if you will create your own career as a generalist (that is what I did and a lot of more other people) or an specialist in a field.
Sergio,
I like that you decided to walk the untrodden path, how did you manage projects in areas where you has minimum expertise?
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1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Apr 02, 2017 10:28 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
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In fact, from years ago I managed projects and programs in areas where I do not have expertisse. That is the point. You must not be an expert. You must have knowledge which is not the same. It is simple: each time I am assigned to a new initiative (and no matter I have expertisse or not) I perform elicitation activities before everything is started to know about the domain, the business, the stakeholders, the problems other organizations are facing into the business.
Apr 01, 2017 6:44 AM
Replying to Tim Podesta
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Vincent, I second your point here. There are strong parallels across construction, manufacturing, IT, and change/transformation projects that project managers have in common. What is different is the industry context , culture and language.
Tim,
On a macro level of project management, you are right. The methods like Prince2 and PMP still oversee projects from conception to completion, but as PMs, how do we cross different industry context, culture, and language? Or can we?
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1 reply by Tim Podesta
Apr 02, 2017 5:06 AM
Tim Podesta
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Crossing industry context, culture and language (I mean terminology here) is possible in the same way as commercial and business managers, particularly at senior levels, cross industries. My own experience is that it in a large organisation it is possible to cross from construction to IT and change/transformation projects. My moves depended on opportunities and matching the skills I offered - in my case investment analysis, front end planing and benchmarking and a track record as a programme manager. All the best. Tim
Apr 02, 2017 2:37 AM
Replying to John Rice
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Deepesh,
Is Project Management a professional or a skill set? Are we a jack of all trades? Or do we need technical expertise to influence our project outcomes? I understand application development need Agile or Waterfall, can their methods still apply elsewhere?
Project Management is a skill set and waterfall and agile can be applied to any industry I think. I cannot be sure though because I've always worked in the IT Projects space. Having said that, if I am a construction project manager, it would definitely help if I had a civil engineering or architecture background... Similarly if I deliver projects in IT, a background in IT helps
...
1 reply by John Rice
Apr 02, 2017 5:22 AM
John Rice
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Thank you Deepesh
Apr 02, 2017 2:52 AM
Replying to John Rice
...
Tim,
On a macro level of project management, you are right. The methods like Prince2 and PMP still oversee projects from conception to completion, but as PMs, how do we cross different industry context, culture, and language? Or can we?
Crossing industry context, culture and language (I mean terminology here) is possible in the same way as commercial and business managers, particularly at senior levels, cross industries. My own experience is that it in a large organisation it is possible to cross from construction to IT and change/transformation projects. My moves depended on opportunities and matching the skills I offered - in my case investment analysis, front end planing and benchmarking and a track record as a programme manager. All the best. Tim
...
1 reply by John Rice
Apr 02, 2017 5:23 AM
John Rice
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Tim
Thank you for your insight and experience
Apr 02, 2017 3:03 AM
Replying to Deepesh Rammoorthy
...
Project Management is a skill set and waterfall and agile can be applied to any industry I think. I cannot be sure though because I've always worked in the IT Projects space. Having said that, if I am a construction project manager, it would definitely help if I had a civil engineering or architecture background... Similarly if I deliver projects in IT, a background in IT helps
Thank you Deepesh
Apr 02, 2017 5:06 AM
Replying to Tim Podesta
...
Crossing industry context, culture and language (I mean terminology here) is possible in the same way as commercial and business managers, particularly at senior levels, cross industries. My own experience is that it in a large organisation it is possible to cross from construction to IT and change/transformation projects. My moves depended on opportunities and matching the skills I offered - in my case investment analysis, front end planing and benchmarking and a track record as a programme manager. All the best. Tim
Tim
Thank you for your insight and experience
Apr 02, 2017 2:48 AM
Replying to John Rice
...
Sergio,
I like that you decided to walk the untrodden path, how did you manage projects in areas where you has minimum expertise?
In fact, from years ago I managed projects and programs in areas where I do not have expertisse. That is the point. You must not be an expert. You must have knowledge which is not the same. It is simple: each time I am assigned to a new initiative (and no matter I have expertisse or not) I perform elicitation activities before everything is started to know about the domain, the business, the stakeholders, the problems other organizations are facing into the business.
...
1 reply by John Rice
Apr 02, 2017 11:34 PM
John Rice
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Sergio,
That is comforting however that places you in s position where you depend on your experts to guide you through the difficult decision, sounds vulnerable.
Apr 02, 2017 10:28 AM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
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In fact, from years ago I managed projects and programs in areas where I do not have expertisse. That is the point. You must not be an expert. You must have knowledge which is not the same. It is simple: each time I am assigned to a new initiative (and no matter I have expertisse or not) I perform elicitation activities before everything is started to know about the domain, the business, the stakeholders, the problems other organizations are facing into the business.
Sergio,
That is comforting however that places you in s position where you depend on your experts to guide you through the difficult decision, sounds vulnerable.
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Apr 03, 2017 5:09 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
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We have to undestand that critical decisions about project are taking by subject matter experts not by the project manager. That is the key point to understand. And here is where most of the project managers fail. No matter you have expertisse on a field or not you never will have the whole information to take critical decision about a project.
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