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Topics: Agile
For Agile, any information on having a Scrum Master and Project Administartor, and not have a Project Manager?
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Anyone have experience on having a Scrum Master and Project Administrator on Agile without having a Project Manager? If so, does it matter the complexity of the project/effort? What would be the criteria for not having a Project Manager?
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Interesting concept, there are prior posts asking if the Scrum Master and PM were one and the same. Assuming they are definitely not, here is my response. The Scrum Master's job is to execute according to the agile methodology and help guide and direct the team as they progress through sprints. They have a role that in my view equates to only a small portion of what a traditional PM would have. Taking that into account, if the assumption is that the Project Administrator would take on ALL the other tasks that a typical Project Manager would: managing budget, scope, communication with stakeholders etc. then it may work. If there is no Project Administrator or they're role is relegated to only the internal "admin" tasks of the project, then the project would be in jeopardy no matter what the size. You may be able to get away with it on very small efforts, but to be truly successful you must have the Scrum Master and the Project Administrator both working their role, and then some, to achieve the same success because neither role in and of itself carries the weight of burden for project execution like a PM does.
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1 reply by Cheryl McNamara
Mar 31, 2017 5:02 PM
Cheryl McNamara
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Liana, This make a great deal of sense. My concern would be for an entry level PA not understanding the complexity of budget and scope. It would be "above their pay grade" so to speak. And if a scrum master has never been a Project Manager, they not easily be able to master budget, stakeholders, business risks/issues, etc.
Network:38



Mar 31, 2017 4:44 PM
Replying to Liana Underwood
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Interesting concept, there are prior posts asking if the Scrum Master and PM were one and the same. Assuming they are definitely not, here is my response. The Scrum Master's job is to execute according to the agile methodology and help guide and direct the team as they progress through sprints. They have a role that in my view equates to only a small portion of what a traditional PM would have. Taking that into account, if the assumption is that the Project Administrator would take on ALL the other tasks that a typical Project Manager would: managing budget, scope, communication with stakeholders etc. then it may work. If there is no Project Administrator or they're role is relegated to only the internal "admin" tasks of the project, then the project would be in jeopardy no matter what the size. You may be able to get away with it on very small efforts, but to be truly successful you must have the Scrum Master and the Project Administrator both working their role, and then some, to achieve the same success because neither role in and of itself carries the weight of burden for project execution like a PM does.
Liana, This make a great deal of sense. My concern would be for an entry level PA not understanding the complexity of budget and scope. It would be "above their pay grade" so to speak. And if a scrum master has never been a Project Manager, they not easily be able to master budget, stakeholders, business risks/issues, etc.
Network:613



Are you talking about the roles of a project manager on a traditional project and how they apply to agile? They all still apply, they are just performed by different people. Here is a short article that explains it well.

https://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/agile...ject-management

I think I've seen at least one flavor of agile that named the role of project manager, but I don't recall which. You are more likely to see a project manager on a hybrid project, where development is done iteratively, but there are a lot of other parts of the project that need a more traditional approach. In cases like this, the Scrum Master and Project Manager can be two different people.
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2 replies by Cheryl McNamara and Vincent Guerard
Apr 03, 2017 11:36 AM
Cheryl McNamara
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Excellent link. Thank you for sharing.
Apr 03, 2017 9:57 PM
Vincent Guerard
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Thanks for the link , very interesting
Network:1281



You ever, ever have a project manager assigned to an initiative no mattter the approach. But you have to remember that project manager is a role and because of that you can name the role with other name. Regarding to methods belonging to Agile you can find some with project manager role with a different name and others (like DSDM) where the role name is project manager. But you ever, ever has one.
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1 reply by Cheryl McNamara
Apr 03, 2017 11:37 AM
Cheryl McNamara
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Thank you.
Network:1286



Agile or not, I have seen the number of hours a project is expected to carry as a basis for the requirement of an official PM. Haven't really seen that work out, but those criteria were set as the model to follow.
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1 reply by Cheryl McNamara
Apr 03, 2017 11:37 AM
Cheryl McNamara
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Interesting, thank you.
Network:38



Mar 31, 2017 5:08 PM
Replying to Aaron Porter
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Are you talking about the roles of a project manager on a traditional project and how they apply to agile? They all still apply, they are just performed by different people. Here is a short article that explains it well.

https://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/agile...ject-management

I think I've seen at least one flavor of agile that named the role of project manager, but I don't recall which. You are more likely to see a project manager on a hybrid project, where development is done iteratively, but there are a lot of other parts of the project that need a more traditional approach. In cases like this, the Scrum Master and Project Manager can be two different people.
Excellent link. Thank you for sharing.
Network:38



Apr 01, 2017 7:31 AM
Replying to Andrew Craig, PMP, PSM
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Agile or not, I have seen the number of hours a project is expected to carry as a basis for the requirement of an official PM. Haven't really seen that work out, but those criteria were set as the model to follow.
Interesting, thank you.
Network:38



Apr 01, 2017 5:51 AM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
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You ever, ever have a project manager assigned to an initiative no mattter the approach. But you have to remember that project manager is a role and because of that you can name the role with other name. Regarding to methods belonging to Agile you can find some with project manager role with a different name and others (like DSDM) where the role name is project manager. But you ever, ever has one.
Thank you.
Network:187



There is no Project Manager role in Scrum. There are only 3 positions: developer, scrum master, and product owner.

That said, there's no rule that says you can't have some sort of administrator or analyst to assist the product owner. What you can't do is delegate the responsibility of the product owner. The PO needs to be a unified voice, not a committee.

You can be Agile without using Scrum, of course, but then you don't need a scrum master.
Network:71021



Mar 31, 2017 5:08 PM
Replying to Aaron Porter
...
Are you talking about the roles of a project manager on a traditional project and how they apply to agile? They all still apply, they are just performed by different people. Here is a short article that explains it well.

https://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/agile...ject-management

I think I've seen at least one flavor of agile that named the role of project manager, but I don't recall which. You are more likely to see a project manager on a hybrid project, where development is done iteratively, but there are a lot of other parts of the project that need a more traditional approach. In cases like this, the Scrum Master and Project Manager can be two different people.
Thanks for the link , very interesting

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