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Topics: Agile, PMO, Utility
Best PM Lesson Learned/Bit of Wisdom
Network:145



Hi there, Everyone!

I'm new on the PM scene, a recently minted PMP, and looking to learn from people who've already been walking the path. I'd love to know the top, best thing you've learned experientially during your career as a PM.

One thing piece of wisdom/caution/inspiration/concrete advice, etc.

I'd love to hear from you all and benefit from you all.

Thanks so much, in advance!

Jon
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Network:5346



Welcome to the club Jonathan. Its difficult what we've learned over the past decades in a single piece:-)

I would at that 'Project heroics only lead to project failure'

Heroes only look good in the movies. Trying to apply project heroics to rush a feature into production or thinking that one individual will successfully deliver a project can only lead to failure.

My key takeaway: Build and trust an effective team.

The key to successful projects is to learn from past project failures and to put those lessons learned into action.
Wish you all the best in your journey. Cheers!
...
1 reply by Jonathan Fedor
Apr 14, 2017 12:50 PM
Jonathan Fedor
...
Thanks very much for the kind welcome. I'm excited to be here starting on this journey. Learning a lot already.

You're absolutely right that a single piece of advice or wisdom is unreasonable but I think you totally hit the mark! I really appreciate your thoughtful response. Avoid project heroics and building a trustworthy, trusting team are so valuable.

Question: Generally speaking, what are the first couple of steps that you take to build your teams when starting a new project with a new team?

Thanks!
Network:145



Apr 14, 2017 12:24 PM
Replying to Nasrullah Mohammed
...
Welcome to the club Jonathan. Its difficult what we've learned over the past decades in a single piece:-)

I would at that 'Project heroics only lead to project failure'

Heroes only look good in the movies. Trying to apply project heroics to rush a feature into production or thinking that one individual will successfully deliver a project can only lead to failure.

My key takeaway: Build and trust an effective team.

The key to successful projects is to learn from past project failures and to put those lessons learned into action.
Wish you all the best in your journey. Cheers!
Thanks very much for the kind welcome. I'm excited to be here starting on this journey. Learning a lot already.

You're absolutely right that a single piece of advice or wisdom is unreasonable but I think you totally hit the mark! I really appreciate your thoughtful response. Avoid project heroics and building a trustworthy, trusting team are so valuable.

Question: Generally speaking, what are the first couple of steps that you take to build your teams when starting a new project with a new team?

Thanks!
...
1 reply by Nasrullah Mohammed
Apr 14, 2017 5:10 PM
Nasrullah Mohammed
...
Building a good team takes patience, thorough planning, and the discipline and willingness to not take on everything at once. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither should your new team.

To build a successful new team you need to:

1) Clarify project purpose and goals
2) Choose the right people & identify necessary skills
3) Establish rules & expectations
4) Build relationships with each of the team members
5) Delegate
6) Monitor progress
7) Celebrate your success(es)
Network:145



Anyone else? Would love to hear from more fellow PMs.
Network:5346



Apr 14, 2017 12:50 PM
Replying to Jonathan Fedor
...
Thanks very much for the kind welcome. I'm excited to be here starting on this journey. Learning a lot already.

You're absolutely right that a single piece of advice or wisdom is unreasonable but I think you totally hit the mark! I really appreciate your thoughtful response. Avoid project heroics and building a trustworthy, trusting team are so valuable.

Question: Generally speaking, what are the first couple of steps that you take to build your teams when starting a new project with a new team?

Thanks!
Building a good team takes patience, thorough planning, and the discipline and willingness to not take on everything at once. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither should your new team.

To build a successful new team you need to:

1) Clarify project purpose and goals
2) Choose the right people & identify necessary skills
3) Establish rules & expectations
4) Build relationships with each of the team members
5) Delegate
6) Monitor progress
7) Celebrate your success(es)
...
1 reply by Jonathan Fedor
Apr 15, 2017 2:41 PM
Jonathan Fedor
...
Thanks, Nasrullah! Really love the bits about patience and not trying to take on everything at once. Good words that I can take to heart and put into practice.
Network:71132



First welcome

Build a successful team, have them trust you. And trust them, challenge them give them challenge.

Keep on learning
...
1 reply by Jonathan Fedor
Apr 15, 2017 2:43 PM
Jonathan Fedor
...
This is great; thanks, Vincent! I definitely tend to struggle more, naturally, with the giving trust to others. Big area of improvement for me. Thanks!
Network:145



Apr 14, 2017 5:10 PM
Replying to Nasrullah Mohammed
...
Building a good team takes patience, thorough planning, and the discipline and willingness to not take on everything at once. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and neither should your new team.

To build a successful new team you need to:

1) Clarify project purpose and goals
2) Choose the right people & identify necessary skills
3) Establish rules & expectations
4) Build relationships with each of the team members
5) Delegate
6) Monitor progress
7) Celebrate your success(es)
Thanks, Nasrullah! Really love the bits about patience and not trying to take on everything at once. Good words that I can take to heart and put into practice.
Network:145



Apr 14, 2017 9:00 PM
Replying to Vincent Guerard
...
First welcome

Build a successful team, have them trust you. And trust them, challenge them give them challenge.

Keep on learning
This is great; thanks, Vincent! I definitely tend to struggle more, naturally, with the giving trust to others. Big area of improvement for me. Thanks!
Network:1687



Jonathan:
Congrats, just know that everyone's path is different and it's as much about your personal journey than anything else right now.

My best advice; get comfortable being uncomfortable every day.
...
1 reply by Jonathan Fedor
Apr 17, 2017 9:20 AM
Jonathan Fedor
...
Good words - sounds like I stumbled into the right career :-)
Network:63



hi Johathan and welcome to the team,

I'd say there are lots of best practices and lessons that we get learn along the way; and also lots of quotes of wisdom that help as well. Let me highlight some that I think have been very useful to me:

* Build an environment of trust, not only with your team, but also with your stakeholders. And this implies many things:

- for your team, they shouldn't feel afraid of highlighting issues, concerns or risks that they foresee. It's much better to know when you are about to hit a wall, than hit it with your eyes closed. On team meetings I always asks them: is there anything you feel we are missing or doing wrong? do you foresee any risk on this? should we be concerned about anything?
if it is not possible for them to meet a dead line, let them tell you and explain, and then see all of you together what can be done. If there is a mistake (from anyone, you included), acknowledge it, don't focus on culprits, learn from it, and try NOT to make the same error again, as i say to my teams / students, let's make sure all our mistakes are original, never a repeated one! :)

- recognize good work when done, take care of your team.

- don't be afraid of raising risks or flags, and make sure your team is aligned too. The same that applies to you and your team, applies to the business and stakeholders. Personally, when raising a risk I also try to share a mitigation or contingency plan as well, so that they are aware "we anticipate that this may happen" and "we are doing this to try to avoid it" or "we'll do that in case it happens". Personally I feel more comfortable with that approach that keeping risks in mistery (no to "scare people" and them give them a nice shockdown with the issue).

- relatd to the previous one, don't be afraid with highlighting an issue when it has happened. I try to also present the solution or paths we are analysing to fix it as well, when presenting the issue (at least, that way you are conveying the message "this happened, but we are already working to have it fixed and we are taking this steps") so that diminishes "nervousy" regarding the situation. Obviously, you'll have to keep in mind what is the best way to convey the situation to each stakeholder (shall I call this person on the phone, speak to him/her beforehand, shall i call out for a meeting with all and announce there, send a mail, etc). In this kind of situations is particularly where your stakeholder analysis pays off.

On quotes, I really like this one from Walt Disney: "“Of all the things I’ve done, the most vital is coordinating the talents of those who work for us and pointing them towards a certain goal.” 

I know this was a long response. Hope it helps and that you enjoy your career on Project Management.

Regards,
Griselda
...
1 reply by Jonathan Fedor
Apr 17, 2017 9:23 AM
Jonathan Fedor
...
Thanks for the good words, Griselda. The people-oriented nature of project management is a huge attraction to the job for me. Just about everything you touched on involves or relates to dealing with human brothers and sisters; I love that.

I really appreciated your encouragement to take care of the team especially when good work is done!
Network:145



Apr 15, 2017 8:29 PM
Replying to Naomi Caietti
...
Jonathan:
Congrats, just know that everyone's path is different and it's as much about your personal journey than anything else right now.

My best advice; get comfortable being uncomfortable every day.
Good words - sounds like I stumbled into the right career :-)
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