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Practice Areas: Agile
Which one first?
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I've been looking at Agile and PMP and have no clue which one to write exam on first, any guidance will be greatly appreciated. I'm not even sure if this is the correct forum to raise the question
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Do you want to do both? And what's the biggest value for you? If you need just PMI-ACP, then don't spend time on PMP which is pretty hard to pass. If you want to do both and you don't really need Agile first, I would suggest to pass your PMP. It's just easier for hours that you need to prove - if you have PMP then you just attach it to PMI-ACP registration form and you don't need to bother about PM hours (if you'll be selected to audit, it can save you time). If you do Agile one first then you need to prove PM hours there and later again for PMP. If you would be super unlucky with 2 audits then it will delay your exams by weeks. This is the way how I plan to pass those exams, PMP first :)
Network:164



Thank you very much, this helps a lot. I want to do both to try to be more marketable in South Africa ??
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1 reply by Eric Simms
May 08, 2017 10:26 AM
Eric Simms
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I'd go for the PMP first. The PMP is recognized as an international project management standard. Every recruiter, hiring manager and executive is familiar with the PMP, but not as many have heard of the PMI-ACP credential.
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May 08, 2017 10:05 AM
Replying to Robert Whitehead
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Thank you very much, this helps a lot. I want to do both to try to be more marketable in South Africa ??
I'd go for the PMP first. The PMP is recognized as an international project management standard. Every recruiter, hiring manager and executive is familiar with the PMP, but not as many have heard of the PMI-ACP credential.
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What does the job market tell you? When you look at job descriptions, what are companies asking for? Are there a lot of PMPs in your area? Are there many Agile certified professionals? Think of it as a quadrant comparing demand and competition, or the number of companies looking for someone with a specific certification compared to the number of people with the certification.

Low demand, low competition - certification may not be necessary, but can give you an edge long-term
Low demand, high competition - choose a new field
High demand, high competition - you have to be certified to compete, and it will be a competition
High demand, low competition - If either the PMP or agile certification fits into this category, it is the one to go for
Network:160



I don't have PMI-ACP but that hasn't stopped me from working on Agile-related projects. With a PMP credential, it is well-known to get started. Unless an employer requires a specific certification, and willing to pay for it, i would say go for the well-known ones first. Having a PMP isn't going to automatically get you hired, it may give you an edge with the hiring organization over cancddates without it.

Check your local markets as well and check to see if there are employers willing to pay for the certifications or maybe give you 90 - 120 days after hire to acquire it. It may be a good way to have a job in hand before spending funds to get certified. Keep studying the material while looking for a job and let prospective emplyers know that you are working towards it. Good luck!
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PMP then Agile
Network:1036



I'd agree with the sentiments above; PMP, then ACP. Good Luck!
Network:449



I agree here as well. get the PMP, and then take the Lynda.com Essentials courses for Agile to see how Agile can help in some instances to improve your ability to do a better job. If you wish to get an Agile or Scrum credential later, you can use the essential courses to hone your skills. (And get PMI PDU credit as well.)
Network:2446



Agree with most, PMP then Agile
Network:8121



Agree with some of the previous comments, first PMP, after maybe Agile, Scrum, or Six Sigma...all depends not only the market as Aaron pointed also what you really like.
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1 reply by John Tieso
May 11, 2017 7:25 PM
John Tieso
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You make an interesting point here. It makes no sense to get certifications which will not be used in your employment environment. it is, of course, always good to gain more education, but, without the experience, the certification becomes less useful after a time.

Conversely, your organization may want to expand its horizons, add capabilities, and taking courses, and sitting for certifications make sense.
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