Project Management Central

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Topics: Construction, Consulting, PMI Standards
You are Project Manager in a Project Management Consultancy firm, your team member has made a mistake, which will cause the contractor time and cost, how will you manage the situation?
Network:27



You are managing a construction project, your team member has approved a material not desirable by Client and you agree with the Client, this change will cost the contractor time and cost, in a Fixed Price Project, how will you manage this situation?
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Network:5018



We need to follow the contract. This will sometimes have consequential damages also.
If it is only " personal wish or desire " rather than technical requirement , by a good relationship we can have a give and take agreement.
Network:712



If the material specification is signed off by client and yet not followed then it is Project Managers mistake and need to fix this problem at the earliest.
What is the authority level of the team member who has approved the material ?

Check with supplier if the material is not used can be exchanged with the approved make and amount need to be adjusted within the budget.
Network:186



I'd look at using the project's contingency budget, it is there for situations like this, and get the project back on track as fast as possible. This will show positive action & should help to mend the relationship with the Client.
Network:1148



Better to correct the mistake. You may highlight a risk to the client and correct it.
Try to expedite the timelines and use contingency budget to bear cost.
Network:156



I agree with what has been said up to this point, but the details you give a little vague. Most of the answers here are classifying this as a "mistake," which may not be the actual case. If there are signed-off material specifications and the material in question meets those specifications, then there may be room for a "change order" in relation to the client (and your own) preference. If there are no agreed upon material specifications then there is a possible process issue in relation to the project because material specs and drawings should be approved prior to most (if not all!) purchases (excluding long lead items, but those at least should have the material specs).

However, if there are approved material specs and the material ordered is not suitable, then the project needs to swallow the cost and determine methods for correction, either through working with the supplier to swap, purchasing new material and attempting to sell the incorrect material or by adjusting the design.

In addition, the project may need to find ways to address the contractor time. Can you adjust the sequence of events to address the delivery timetable of the new material? Perhaps other activities can occur earlier in the project plan to make use of the time? Can you "crash" the project with some temporary labor to pick-up the time? What type of buffers do you have in place? Considering this is construction, will it eat into your weather windows?

There are a lot of details to consider when dealing with an issue like this. At the very least, to keep it from happening again, you should probably sit down with the client and review material specifications, as well as work through a session to identify any other personal preferences which may impact your project and should be communicated to the project team. I wish you the best of luck!

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