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Topics: Agile, IT Project Management
What is the PMI-ACP certification?
Network:367



Hi, I have two questions relating to the PMI-ACP certification.

Firstly for what kind of job position is the PMI-ACP certification aimed to help? Scrum master? Product Owner? Developer? Project Manager? Or is it a general certification for any of these positions?

Secondly, particularly for those with a PMI-ACP certification. Do you think it is a certification worthwhile to have? Would you recommend someone to get this certification over certifications from the scrum alliance? They have a number of levels of certifications targeting the three job positions CSM/CSPO/CSD.

Would love to hear your thoughts. Thanks
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PMI-ACP is designed to help Agile practitioners, including team leaders, project managers, manager of scrum teams, scrum team member like developers, product owners and scrum masters. PMI-ACP is the highest level of certification for agile. I agree none of the certifications get you any position, but they open the doors of major organizations for you.
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1 reply by Karl Stiller
Jun 15, 2017 4:11 AM
Karl Stiller
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Thanks Namrata, certifications definitely don't guarantee anything. But I agree that they can open the doors to possibilities.
Network:367



Jun 14, 2017 12:52 PM
Replying to Namrata Dokewar
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PMI-ACP is designed to help Agile practitioners, including team leaders, project managers, manager of scrum teams, scrum team member like developers, product owners and scrum masters. PMI-ACP is the highest level of certification for agile. I agree none of the certifications get you any position, but they open the doors of major organizations for you.
Thanks Namrata, certifications definitely don't guarantee anything. But I agree that they can open the doors to possibilities.
Network:508



In my humble opinion: I've done PRINCE2 and is currently busy with PMP as well as Agile or PMI-ACP. I found that Agile is a very good approach and can definitely speed things up, but you do need buy-in from all the stakeholders when trying to implement it. If the company you work for has got lots of laborious processes to get management to approve anything you'll not be able to implement Agile successfully.
...
1 reply by Karl Stiller
Jun 15, 2017 8:27 AM
Karl Stiller
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Agreed especially for my field which is software, agile cannot be beaten! I love it.
Network:326



Interesting question and in India, I do see organizations asking for Scrum Alliance Certificate more than the PMI-ACP, I do agree that PMI-ACP covers a wide spectrum of Agile but still its difficult to explain this all to the recruiter who has CSM in the job profile.

We do have free PMI-ACP INtoductory program which clarifies details related to PMI-ACP certificate: https://www.izenbridge.com/pmi-acp/free-pmi-acp-introduction/
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1 reply by Karl Stiller
Jun 15, 2017 8:44 AM
Karl Stiller
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I was trying to find some information about when each certification started, but can't find any data anywhere. I believe the Scrum Alliance has had their certifications for longer which may be why it is more requested by the industry, another may be that each certification is tailored for each job position. Anyway, it will be interesting to find out how the industry looks at each certification over time.
Network:1372



I am PMI-ACP certified. And in the same field (Agile) I am DSDM AP&C (Advanced Practitioner and Coach). PMI-ACP is a "generalistic" certification that allows you to work into each Agile environment no matter the method you use. DSDM is specific to the method like SCM and others. I will say what I do each time I decided starting the effort to get a certification. I perform an estimation about future market demands. As any other estimation is based on information and time to perform the estimation. And as any other estimation it has an amount of uncertainty which could impact in accept some amount of error in the calculation.
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1 reply by Karl Stiller
Jun 15, 2017 9:00 AM
Karl Stiller
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Thanks for the information. I am amazed how many organisations there are with an agile certification. PMI, Scrum Alliance, Agile business Consortium and another I found while looking for the starting date of the Scrum Alliance certifications, scrum.org. Wow! I won't dare to search for any more organisations! Though, it's good to see that the agile industry is alive with people testing and trying different methods. A nightmare for anyone wanting to have an agile certification though, which to pick? :-)
Network:367



Jun 15, 2017 4:58 AM
Replying to Robert Whitehead
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In my humble opinion: I've done PRINCE2 and is currently busy with PMP as well as Agile or PMI-ACP. I found that Agile is a very good approach and can definitely speed things up, but you do need buy-in from all the stakeholders when trying to implement it. If the company you work for has got lots of laborious processes to get management to approve anything you'll not be able to implement Agile successfully.
Agreed especially for my field which is software, agile cannot be beaten! I love it.
Network:367



Jun 15, 2017 6:30 AM
Replying to Saket Bansal
...
Interesting question and in India, I do see organizations asking for Scrum Alliance Certificate more than the PMI-ACP, I do agree that PMI-ACP covers a wide spectrum of Agile but still its difficult to explain this all to the recruiter who has CSM in the job profile.

We do have free PMI-ACP INtoductory program which clarifies details related to PMI-ACP certificate: https://www.izenbridge.com/pmi-acp/free-pmi-acp-introduction/
I was trying to find some information about when each certification started, but can't find any data anywhere. I believe the Scrum Alliance has had their certifications for longer which may be why it is more requested by the industry, another may be that each certification is tailored for each job position. Anyway, it will be interesting to find out how the industry looks at each certification over time.
Network:367



Jun 15, 2017 6:39 AM
Replying to Sergio Luis Conte
...
I am PMI-ACP certified. And in the same field (Agile) I am DSDM AP&C (Advanced Practitioner and Coach). PMI-ACP is a "generalistic" certification that allows you to work into each Agile environment no matter the method you use. DSDM is specific to the method like SCM and others. I will say what I do each time I decided starting the effort to get a certification. I perform an estimation about future market demands. As any other estimation is based on information and time to perform the estimation. And as any other estimation it has an amount of uncertainty which could impact in accept some amount of error in the calculation.
Thanks for the information. I am amazed how many organisations there are with an agile certification. PMI, Scrum Alliance, Agile business Consortium and another I found while looking for the starting date of the Scrum Alliance certifications, scrum.org. Wow! I won't dare to search for any more organisations! Though, it's good to see that the agile industry is alive with people testing and trying different methods. A nightmare for anyone wanting to have an agile certification though, which to pick? :-)
...
1 reply by Sergio Luis Conte
Oct 01, 2017 9:31 AM
Sergio Luis Conte
...
In my case, what to choose it is a result of future market demands. And because it is an estimation there is an inherent amount of uncertainty on it. In fact, I was the first PMI-ACP certified in Latin America and today you will see not too much certified people around the world. Agile is not about a method or process. I am leading my seventh initiative in the field and I was part of the group that formally create Agile inside the USA DoD NSF/Agility Forum (1990). But certifications, including the PMI certification, is method oriented. When you go to the methods most of the people around the world thinks that Scrum is a synonim of Agile. Totally wrong (that is because you could face situations like @Dinah stated). That is more strong in the Americas (not USA only). In Europe DSDM has a well stablished position. I do not know about Australia.
Network:1295



I just obtained my PMI-ACP last week. On the same day I had a phone interview scheduled with a recruiter. We were going through my certifications. I was excited to tell her that I just passed this certification. She said congratulations and then asked if I had Scrum Master certification. I think the challenge I may have is that recruiters do not understand yet what the PMI-ACP is. I am considering going ahead a getting the Scrum Master as well.
Network:1372



Jun 15, 2017 9:00 AM
Replying to Karl Stiller
...
Thanks for the information. I am amazed how many organisations there are with an agile certification. PMI, Scrum Alliance, Agile business Consortium and another I found while looking for the starting date of the Scrum Alliance certifications, scrum.org. Wow! I won't dare to search for any more organisations! Though, it's good to see that the agile industry is alive with people testing and trying different methods. A nightmare for anyone wanting to have an agile certification though, which to pick? :-)
In my case, what to choose it is a result of future market demands. And because it is an estimation there is an inherent amount of uncertainty on it. In fact, I was the first PMI-ACP certified in Latin America and today you will see not too much certified people around the world. Agile is not about a method or process. I am leading my seventh initiative in the field and I was part of the group that formally create Agile inside the USA DoD NSF/Agility Forum (1990). But certifications, including the PMI certification, is method oriented. When you go to the methods most of the people around the world thinks that Scrum is a synonim of Agile. Totally wrong (that is because you could face situations like @Dinah stated). That is more strong in the Americas (not USA only). In Europe DSDM has a well stablished position. I do not know about Australia.
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