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Practice Areas: Career Development, Organizational Project Management
Does it really matter whether a PMP is per 1st or 6th edition of the PMBOK Guide?
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In another discussion - and many other online discussions here or on LinkedIn, we see daily posts - if not more, by various training provider (by the way - I do manage a training company).

These posts talk about pressures, dilemma, concern about the change in the PMBOK Guide and whether people should take the exam now or wait.

Does it really matter?

Does it really matter if you are a PMP per the first 1996 edition or by the 6th edition in 2018 and beyond? Is one PMP more valuable than another?

If not, then why the hype? Why do we confuse people and the professional community?
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Not if you keep up your PDU's, and reading.
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Pretty much came to say similar to Sante. No, it does not matter. By the PM diligently fulfilling their PDU's, they are remaining current to the profession.
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While I agree generally with the previous responses, I might suggest that you try to model your efforts from more recent versions, augmented by reading on current topics practiced in the field. Things change over time, and customers expect current practice, current, known best practices, and more modern methods, techniques, and tools, including the later versions of the pMBOK.
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Thank you -

Follow up question, so by reading or attended classes (that could be non-PM) for about 20 hours per year, is this enough to confirm validity? How about if someone is not even working in PM but continue to claim the PDU and renew?
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I'm not convince that just fulfilling your PDU will keep you on top.
Most of the content of PMBOK from version to version evolve but in the most is the same better presented with clarification.
So the essential was in the early version, new concept introduce.
Like CPA things have evolved over time, experience is key for PMP
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From my point of view, the perfect answer for a certified project manager is "Is it matter for you?" It means each of us will have a different approach and hunger of knowledge.

In my case, I was certificated with 5th Edition, I participated in the 6th Edition draft review, and I'll look forward the release to update my knowledge and continuing helping others to get their certification.

I understand that for some providers, instructors and future new practitioners each edition is a challenge, from adapting the material to the worries about the new test.
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A few thoughts to consider...

* New content in the new version of the PMBOK is usually not brand new information that nobody has heard of. It's more likely information that has been getting attention in the year or two prior to release.

* There may have been questions related to this information on the latest exam, before the new release.

* 100% of the PMBOK may not be applicable where you work as a project manager. I know, this sounds like heresy. But be honest; does every project you run have entries on the project schedule that address activities and deliverables from every process group and knowledge area in the PMBOK Guide? (Hint: it's called a Guide for a reason)

* A project manager that can't stay current on the things that matter in his or her job market will, effectively, remove him or herself from the job market.

My cynical (realistic?) side wants me to point out that a training company is going to create hype and urgency around changes to the exam because the training company is a business. To stay in business, you need customers. If there is no urgency for a good or service, you won't have many customers.

To answer the follow up question, there is not enough data to definitively state whether or not 20 hours per year is enough to stay current. It might be for some, and might not be for others.

If I were going to invest in 20 hours of training, it would, first, be on topics that directly relate to upcoming projects that I need more information on, and, second, on other topics that interest me. New material in the PMBOK Guide might not fit into either of these categories, for me.

You should also consider that the people actively engaged in forums, like this, are more than likely doing more than the minimum to maintain their credential, and doing more than just training classes to accomplish this. Someone that relies solely on training might be at a disadvantage.
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2 replies by Dale Scriven and Mounir Ajam
Jul 06, 2017 4:01 AM
Mounir Ajam
...
Wonderful - thank you for the elaborated answer, appreciate it.
Jul 06, 2017 2:27 PM
Dale Scriven
...
Generally speaking, I agree with your comment. Enterprise Environmental Factors and your industry impact the scope of Project Management one practices. Great topic and conversation.
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Every few years, it is good to take a refresher course/webinar based on the latest PMBOK. Great way to earn PDUs and keep your information up to date.
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Jul 05, 2017 4:36 PM
Replying to Aaron Porter
...
A few thoughts to consider...

* New content in the new version of the PMBOK is usually not brand new information that nobody has heard of. It's more likely information that has been getting attention in the year or two prior to release.

* There may have been questions related to this information on the latest exam, before the new release.

* 100% of the PMBOK may not be applicable where you work as a project manager. I know, this sounds like heresy. But be honest; does every project you run have entries on the project schedule that address activities and deliverables from every process group and knowledge area in the PMBOK Guide? (Hint: it's called a Guide for a reason)

* A project manager that can't stay current on the things that matter in his or her job market will, effectively, remove him or herself from the job market.

My cynical (realistic?) side wants me to point out that a training company is going to create hype and urgency around changes to the exam because the training company is a business. To stay in business, you need customers. If there is no urgency for a good or service, you won't have many customers.

To answer the follow up question, there is not enough data to definitively state whether or not 20 hours per year is enough to stay current. It might be for some, and might not be for others.

If I were going to invest in 20 hours of training, it would, first, be on topics that directly relate to upcoming projects that I need more information on, and, second, on other topics that interest me. New material in the PMBOK Guide might not fit into either of these categories, for me.

You should also consider that the people actively engaged in forums, like this, are more than likely doing more than the minimum to maintain their credential, and doing more than just training classes to accomplish this. Someone that relies solely on training might be at a disadvantage.
Wonderful - thank you for the elaborated answer, appreciate it.
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Aaron: Great observations. it seems to me that just taking some PDUs for the sake of 'remaining current' really doesn't do that at all. it provides smatterings of information, which may or may not be of value to you in the next, or even the next several projects. of course, as one response indicated, if you are not even in the program, how do you know what to study for PDUs?
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