Process Improvement

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Inspections



Value added or no value added? Why?
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Inspections are done for a purpose--that products and processes are reliable that could deliver a service or product to standard quality specifications.

To add value to your inspections, you have to consider other factors such as delivery reliability, efficiency, speed, wastes and delays eliminated and other factors that are expected from products and services. Benchmarks are established (metric, diagnostic, process) which could trigger improvements.
It is adding value with lean quality.
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1 reply by Roddney Hackstall
Aug 07, 2017 9:24 AM
Roddney Hackstall
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Sounds like you are saying the results of inspections is value added, is that correct? Thanks



Aug 06, 2017 10:30 PM
Replying to Jess De Ocampo
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Inspections are done for a purpose--that products and processes are reliable that could deliver a service or product to standard quality specifications.

To add value to your inspections, you have to consider other factors such as delivery reliability, efficiency, speed, wastes and delays eliminated and other factors that are expected from products and services. Benchmarks are established (metric, diagnostic, process) which could trigger improvements.
It is adding value with lean quality.
Sounds like you are saying the results of inspections is value added, is that correct? Thanks
...
1 reply by Jess De Ocampo
Aug 07, 2017 3:46 PM
Jess De Ocampo
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Yes. As I have mentioned, you can further enhance your routine inspections with lean quality.



Inspections has definitely an added value. In many cases inspections reveal things that might save the product or project.



Aug 07, 2017 9:24 AM
Replying to Roddney Hackstall
...
Sounds like you are saying the results of inspections is value added, is that correct? Thanks
Yes. As I have mentioned, you can further enhance your routine inspections with lean quality.



Yes, inspections are needed to monitor project health. Inspections are also used when employing/using third party contractors or software vendors. Inspections would help the organization whether the third party providers are compliant with legal requirements; e.g. HIPAA, etc.



If inspections are done at the right time - before the product is completed - you have a chance to avoid releasing a defective product. When you do quality check,after the product release, all you can do is remove the defective product.



I have to disagree.
From my point of view Inspections are not Value Added. They may be a needed step but not adding value. They add nothing to the product or process. Of course, They help prevent and detect mistakes, but something that should happen.
In the perfect world, If everything is OK and according to plan we shouldn't need inspections
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1 reply by Stéphane Parent
Sep 14, 2017 7:26 PM
Stéphane Parent
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I unfortunately don't live in a perfect world.

If you don't use inspections, how do you prevent and detect mistakes, Diogo?



Sep 14, 2017 6:20 PM
Replying to Diogo Simoes
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I have to disagree.
From my point of view Inspections are not Value Added. They may be a needed step but not adding value. They add nothing to the product or process. Of course, They help prevent and detect mistakes, but something that should happen.
In the perfect world, If everything is OK and according to plan we shouldn't need inspections
I unfortunately don't live in a perfect world.

If you don't use inspections, how do you prevent and detect mistakes, Diogo?
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1 reply by Diogo Simoes
Sep 16, 2017 5:09 AM
Diogo Simoes
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Hi Stéphane,
There is a Japanese Automotive Industry concept for that: "Poka-yoke"
The objective is to create error-proof systems. We use it everyday and everywhere but we don't notice it.
You are probably reading this post on your laptop or tablet. You can try to put a USB connection upside down. Result: don't fit - Error proof :)

Also related to the topic of waste you can look for the japanese concept of: "Muda".



Sep 14, 2017 7:26 PM
Replying to Stéphane Parent
...
I unfortunately don't live in a perfect world.

If you don't use inspections, how do you prevent and detect mistakes, Diogo?
Hi Stéphane,
There is a Japanese Automotive Industry concept for that: "Poka-yoke"
The objective is to create error-proof systems. We use it everyday and everywhere but we don't notice it.
You are probably reading this post on your laptop or tablet. You can try to put a USB connection upside down. Result: don't fit - Error proof :)

Also related to the topic of waste you can look for the japanese concept of: "Muda".
...
1 reply by Stéphane Parent
Oct 13, 2017 3:08 PM
Stéphane Parent
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Finally had a chance to look into this fool-proofing. It looks like poka yoke relies on two things:
1. The product has fool-proofing features built into it
2. The product's fool-proofing features forces a certain, hopefully better, user behaviour

The first item implies that you have to include fool-proofing features in your product's design. These are not functional features so they don't add value to the product. For example, the fact I have to depress the clutch in my Corolla before I can start it does not make my car more valuable.

The second item forces changes in the user's behaviour. Does this behaviour change add value to the product? I don't think so. It does, however add "value" to the user by forcing a better behaviour.



I'll definitely look into it. Thanks for sharing, Diogo.
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